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Displaying: 101-120 of 518 documents


101. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Giovanni Simonetta The Realism and Ecology of Augmented Reality: An Ecological Way to Understand the Human-Computer Relationship
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Unlike in the phrase “Virtual Reality,” in the phrase “Augmented Reality” (AR) the stress is put on the word “reality.” It seems, though, that we still lack a concept of reality which can fit the world of both humans and computers. In connection with this philosophical issue, this paper aims to provide the background for a better insight into the meaning of Augmented Reality and its impact on human behavior. My thesis is that an ecological version of direct perception’s realism constitutes the most natural framework from which to start. The ecological approach to perception – namely, the Gibsonian theory of affordances – together with a non-dualistic, pragmatist and evolutionist notion of reality, perfectly fits this purpose. Thus, after a brief survey of the present state of AR technologies, it should become natural to interpret AR digital contents as implementations of affordances.
102. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Joshua Penrod Ingenious Fluids: A Review of The Romantic Machine
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103. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Heather Wiltse Unpacking Digital Material Mediation
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Digital technologies mediate engagement with the world by making activities visible. The automaticity and physicality of the ways in which they do this suggest that it could be productive to view them as responsive digital materials. This paper explores the structure and function of responsive materials in order to develop a conceptualization of responsive digital materials. It then begins to unpack the complexities of digital material mediation through both drawing on and extending existing postphenomenological theory.
104. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Pedro Xavier Mendonça Towards a Material Semiotics' Rhetoric: Persuasion and Mobile Technologies
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The aim of this article is to develop the concept of a material semiotics’ rhetoric as a way to highlight a rhetoric that is not reducible to the symbolic and communicational domains, and which helps to shed light on the construction of features for mobile technologies such as cell phones. To reach this goal, this research makes an articulation between some main notions defining rhetoric as a knowledge and practice—being persuasive, seeking to reach an audience, the use of arguments, in a context of ambiguity and problematization—and the construction of technological artefacts according to Science, Technology, and Society studies.
105. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Daniel Compagnon From Risk Management to Democratic Governance of the Development of Technique: Insights from the Work of Jacques Ellul
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Using the work of Jacques Ellul on technique and its development, this paper criticizes the technological risk management discourse, which claims that risks are “managed” within reasonable limits. In fact, the inevitability of technological change and the uncertainty associated with technology-induced environmental risks, some of which are still totally unknown, undermine the very possibility of democratic governance of risk. Our reliance on technique and the common belief in its infallibility make it particularly arduous to the follow the path showed by Ellul.
106. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Derek Faux Technology and the Limites of the Information Age circa 2002
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This essay examines three competing views of technological change, developed at the beginning of the millennium, and their impact on our lives. The discussion will lead to three conclusions. First, we must be involved in decisions about how technology is regulated and used. Second, we should be wary not to consider all technologies as having the same effects. The cell phone is neither the personal computer nor the television, and there is no reason to consider each as having the same potential social consequences. Third, new methodologies must be developed to account for any changes in social relations that come about as a result of our adoption of these technologies. In the final section of the essay, the consequences of contemporary technologies on what it means to be human are briefly discussed. Rather than substitute technology for democracy or big data for the ability to find significant information, we must take democratic control of these technologies and affirm our humanity. Indeed, I argue along with noted commentators on technology that what makes us human is our ability to sort and find relevant information, reflect on our actions and take risks in associating with other humans. These are things that we must always bear in mind if we are to flourish in the information age.
107. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Bryan Kibbe Status Update: Learning to Live with Complexity after "It's Complicated"
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108. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Jeffrey M. Shaw Machines and Robots: Ethical Considerations
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109. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Marty J. Wolf A Case for Information as a Basis for Ethics
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110. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Neelke Doorn, Diane Michelfelder Editorial: Introducing the New Editorial Team
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111. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Galit Wellner Celling while Driving: Guest Editor's Introduction
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112. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Stacey O. Irwin Technological Reciprocity with a Cell Phone
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Perception and reciprocity are key understandings in the lived experience of driving while using a cellular phone. When I talk on a cell phone while driving, I interpret the world through a variety of technologically mediated perceptions. I interpret the bumps in the road and the bug on the windshield. I perceive the information on the dashboard and the conversation with the Other on the other end of the technological “line” of the phone. This reflection uses hermeneutical phenomenology to address the things themselves in life with which we relate and interact with in our everydayness, as we talk on a cell phone while driving.
113. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Robert Rosenberger The Phenomenological Case for Stricter Regulation of Cell Phones and Driving
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The case is made here for stricter regulations on the use of cell phones (both handheld and hands-free) while driving. I review, contextualize, and expand on a phenomenological account of distracted driving that I have developed across a series of papers. This account remains consistent with the empirical literature on the driver distraction of cell phones, but it also offers an alternative theory on why the distraction of cell phone conversation poses such a considerable danger. My argument is that cell phone distraction results from learned perceptual habits, and that breaking these deeply engrained habits is no simple matter.
114. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Galit Wellner Multi-Attention and the Horcrux Logic: Justifications for Talking on the Cell Phone While Driving
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Attention has been addressed either as a distinction of a figure from background or as a searchlight scanning of a surface. In both ways, attention is limited to a single object. The aim of this article is to suggest a platform for an interpretation of multi-attention, that is, attention based on a multiplicity of objects and spaces. The article describes how attention can be given to more than one object, based on the experiences of pilots, parents and car drivers.
115. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Yoni Van Den Eede On the (In)compatibility of Driving and Phoning: Ask the Technology
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In this paper I comment on the arguments put forth by Robert Rosenberger and Galit Wellner on the issue of using a mobile phone while driving a car, and I do this by way of a detour through the work of Kevin Kelly and Marshall McLuhan. While Rosenberger and Wellner focus first and foremost on the possibilities and impossibilities within the human organism, I seek to add to the debate the however experimental standpoint of the technologies “themselves.”
116. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Lyat Friedman Evenly Suspended Distractive Attention
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This article reviews recent cognitive and neurological approaches to the study of attention. It argues that such research is based on the notion that attention has a positive cognitive function selecting, like a sieve or a filter, elements from the background and foreground, to then be processed by the brain and made conscious when required. These approaches fail to explain cognitive overload and recent findings demonstrating that recognition and understanding—sensory, visual and semantic—also occur prior to attention. Merleau-Ponty and Freud offer a different model: a negative distractive attention. Negative distractive attention serves as a threshold for stimuli excluded by neurological processes regulating overload and ensuring that consciousness can concentrate on the singularity of its objects. Such approach to attention explains how one can drive and talk. It is not a positive multi-tasking model but a negative distractive one.
117. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Rob Spicer Long-Distance Caring Labor: Fatherhood, Smiles, and Affect in the Marketing of the iPhone 4 and FaceTime
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This article is an exploration of Apple’s iPhone 4 as both a technology and an object of marketing. This analysis looks at the FaceTime app and how its marketing created a visual hand-phone-face Deleuzian assemblage while playing on affective connections of parenthood and long-distance caring labor. This is connected to the ways in which mobile telephony creates divided attention between home and labor and the mobile phone and car while driving. This analysis is especially concerned with technological transparency and how it creates divided attention in the home and in the car.
118. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Diane Michelfelder Driving While Beagleated
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In this contribution to the philosophical debate over distracted driving, I defend the idea that talking on the cell phone while driving is an activity that ought neither to be regulated by public policy means nor addressed by means of automotive safety design features, such as the augmented-reality windshield. I arrive at this conclusion through taking a phenomenologically-influenced look at what an average driver pays attention to during the act of driving an automobile. More specifically, I suggest that if driving while “celling” is taken to involve a single act of attention within a single experience, or taken to involve a “weak” form of multi-attention, a way opens up to see driving while “celling” as being “good” driving.
119. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Kirk Besmer Dis-Placed Travel: On the Use of GPS in Automobiles
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In this paper, I pursue a postphenomenological analysis of navigating with GPS in an automobile. I argue that GPS use is essentially different from navigating with a map insofar as one need not establish nor maintain orientation and directionality. Also, GPS provides a disembodied, omniscient navigational perspective. These aspects stem from the fact that GPS relies on earth-orbiting satellites, thereby reinforcing the modern view of the space/place relation that privileges abstract space over concrete, lived places. Following a postphenomenological thesis that technologies are non-neutral mediators of human experience, I examine some important qualitative aspects of traveling with GPS.
120. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Don Ihde Embodiment and Multi- versus Mono-Tasking in Driving-Celling
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In my discussion of the articles in this special issue of Techné I will relate the multiple perspectives on the phenomenon of driving-celling to the core debate, which concerns how this dual activity may be related to the need to have a concentrated focus, on the one hand, or to the possibility of a form of multitasking, on the other. The contributors show multiple perspectives on this phenomenon and draw from a range of authors on the roles of attention, embodiment and perception.