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Displaying: 101-120 of 1423 documents


journal and society information
101. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 1
News and Notes
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focus on biosemiotics
102. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins Michael Polanyi’s Approach to Biological Systems and Contemporary Biosemiotics
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Using the writing of Eliseo Fernandez and Jesper Hoffmeyer, this essay introduces important ideas in the emerging interdisciplinary field known as “biosemiotics.” Later discussion summarizes Michael Polanyi’s criticisms of the Modern Synthesis and his alternative constructive philosophical account of life, evolution and biological study, suggesting areas of overlap with contemporary biosemiotics.
103. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 1
Dániel Bárdos, Gábor Á. Zemplén The Shape of Biology to Come?: The Account of Form and Form of Account in Hoffmeyer’s Biosemiotics
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The essay discusses congruency issues in the biosemiotic approach of the Danish biochemist, Jesper Hoffmeyer. The authors understand Hoffmeyer’s anti-reductionistic approach to be similar to Michael Polanyi’s multi-layered ontology, but suggest that the Polanyian approach has fewer handicaps as a model-building enterprise. We offer a historical review of Hoffmeyer’s polarized narrative of 20th century biology and investigate his central thesis that life and semiosis are coextensive. We argue that Hoffmeyer conflates temporal and spatial features of semiotic systems, his account of emergentism is unclear and the relationship between semiotic evolution and punctuated equilibrium is vague, possibly entailing incongruent metaphysical views.
104. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 1
Walter Gulick Mediation and Meaning
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In their co-authored work, Retrieving Realism, Hubert Dreyfus and Charles Taylor argue that an unfortunate epistemological picture holds us captive. Thinkers enmeshed in this picture focus on what mediates our knowledge when an inner self is distinguished from the outer world. This stance, they say, encourages doubt about whether we really know what we perceive. In this essay I argue that mediation, properly understood, and the inner/outer distinction are crucial for understanding how we know. The stratified ontology of Michael Polanyi and the emphasis on interpretation in biosemiotics provide an approach, set in an evolutionary framework, for illuminating the richness of reality. This richer view examines how and what we can know, the unfolding nature of consciousness, and the embodied depth of existential meaning.
book reviews
105. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 1
Walter Gulick The Whole Creature: Complexity, Biosemiotics and the Evolution of Culture
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106. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins Gatherings in Biosemiotics
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107. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 1
Spencer Case Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition
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journal and society information
108. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 42 > Issue: 4
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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109. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 42 > Issue: 4
Paul Lewis Preface
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journal and society information
110. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 42 > Issue: 4
Notes on Contributors
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111. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 42 > Issue: 4
News and Notes
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112. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 42 > Issue: 4
Paul Craig Roberts Letter to the Editor
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focus on william poteat
113. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 42 > Issue: 4
Robert P. Hyatt Guest Editor’s Introduction
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114. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 42 > Issue: 4
Robert P. Hyatt Poteat and Psychoanalyis
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In this essay I will argue that Poteat clears post-critical ground for the discoveries of Freud the “humanist,” the practice of psychoanalysis, and for the legitimacy of Freudian psychological reflections on human development. I maintain that Poteat considered Freud to be a great genius, dimensions of whose work illuminate the human condition in a most profound way. Freud was a fascinating subject for Poteat because he exemplified many of the philosophical commitments of the Enlightenment that Poteat meant to critique. Further, I argue that several contemporary psychoanalytic theorists are allies in Poteat’s battle against the philosophically corrosive effects of Cartesiansism.
115. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 42 > Issue: 4
Allen R. Dyer Madness as Metaphor: Therapeutic Implications of Post-Critical Thought
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Poteat often spoke of our modern predicament as “madness.” His use of this term was not strictly technical, but he meant it most emphatically. Modern thought created an alienation of self from lived-through experience, which had to be recovered through careful examination of the assumptions of the regnant culture. Polanyi and the post critical enterprise offered a perspective and certain tools for this recovery of self, which may properly be understood to be “therapeutic” both in the metaphorical sense and with the understandings that might be offered by the psychoanalysis and psychotherapy.
116. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 42 > Issue: 4
Ellen Bernal Health Care Ethics Consultation: Personal Knowledge and Apprenticeship
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The intellectual history of Healthcare Ethics Consultation embraces objectivism and its emphasis on knowledge that has already been achieved. As a result, official descriptions, standards, and guidelines for this practice, while valuable, ordinarily exclude consideration of the ethics consultant in the process of knowing. Narratives of complex cases, including those that have led to perceived errors, are signs that point to Michael Polanyi’s notion of personal knowledge. The writings of Polanyi, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and William H. Poteat support a paradigm shift to “post-critical thinking,” opening new avenues for ethics consultation teaching and learning, particularly in the setting of clinical internships.
117. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 42 > Issue: 4
Sam D. Watson Writing into the Post-Critical: The Mindings Collage
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The Mindings Collage offers a corrective of the discarnate and corrosive “critical thinking” image which dominates our institutionalized language, culture, and education. The Mindings Collage provides rationale and directions for a disciplined practice to help persons recognize and exercise their own distinctive minds.
118. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 42 > Issue: 4
Richard C. Prust Poteat and the Challenge of Identifying Persons
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William Poteat’s work is suggestive of an account of personal identity. The reflexive use of “I” in “I shot the sheriff ” places the act of shooting the sheriff in the context of a story—the story of the agent who reflexively refers to himself as “I” —that contextualizes its significance. Thus, I argue, Poteat shifts the logic of inferences about persons and their acts from the standard Aristotelian category logic to a character logic that represents them as mutually implied and their moments as mutually inclusive.
119. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 42 > Issue: 4
Sam Mann Reflections of a White Ghetto Preacher on the Life and Teachings of Dr. William H. Poteat
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W.H. Poteat’s critique is that the Western white way of knowing, “gone mad on Descartes,” led to the corruption of Western culture. The author was inspired by his personal relationship with Poteat and the resonance of Poteat’s teaching—“The whole thing must be rethought”—with Howard Thurman’s corresponding account of a culture profaned by slavery in need of transformed relationships— “We are made for each other.” Consequently, the author entered a 40-year career as a white minister and Preacher at the (Black) St. Mark Union congregation in Kansas City, Mo.
120. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 42 > Issue: 4
Ronald L. Hall Critical Recollection: Poteat’s Polanyian Exercises
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In this essay I explore two basic questions that arise from the fact that William H. Poteat subtitled his last book, Recovering the Ground, “Exercises in Critical Recollection.” The first question is: why does he call these dated remarks recollections? The second question is: why does he call them “critical” instead of “post-critical?” I speculate on answers to both of these questions in ways that I think throw light on Polanyi’s post-critical project. In answer to the first question, I suggest that Poteat is providing the “from” element in Polanyi’s “from-to” distinction a much needed historical emphasis since what we attend “from” is always much more than the parts in an epistemic whole. In my answer to the second question, I offer a view of criticism that is post-critical insofar as it calls us to turn around (to be converted) from critical philosophy’s neglect of history and its correlative loss of the world of the things. Poteat is trying to tell us that attention to memory and recollection is a way of subverting discarnate reflection, the best way to return us to the world.