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161. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Note about Forum Philosophicum
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162. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Hans Goller Mortal Body, Immortal Mind: Does the Brain Really Produce Consciousness?
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Neuroscientists keep telling us that the brain produces consciousness and consciousness does not survive brain death because it ceases when brain activityceases. Research findings on near-death-experiences during cardiac arrest contradict this widely held conviction. They raise perplexing questions with regardto our current understanding of the relationship between consciousness and brain functions. Reports on veridical perceptions during out-of-body experiences suggest that consciousness may be experienced independently of a functioning brain and that self-consciousness may continue even after the termination of brain activity. Data on studies of near-death-experiences could be an incentive to develop alternative theories of the body-mind relation as seen in contemporary neuroscience.
163. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Leslie Armour Morality and The Three-fold Existence of God
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Arguments about the existence of a being who is infinite and perfect involve claims about a being who must appear in all the orders and dimensions of reality.Anything else implies finitude. Ideas about goodness seem inseparable from arguments about the existence of God and Kant’s claim that such arguments ultimately belong to moral theology seems plausible. The claim that we can rely on the postulates of pure practical reason is stronger than many suppose. But one must show that a being who is infinite and perfect is even possible, and any such being must be present in the physical world as well as in what Pascal called the orders of the intellect and morality (which he called the order of charity). Indeed, locating God in the various orders without creating conflicts is problematic. Such arguments are necessarily difficult and sometimes self-defeating but I argue in this paper that there is a promising path.
164. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Yann Schmitt Hume on Miracles: The Issue of Question—Begging
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Hume’s chapter “Of Miracles” has been widely discussed, and one issue is that Hume seems to simply beg the question. Hume has a strong but implicit naturalist bias when he argues against the existence of reliable testimony for miracles. In this article, I explain that Hume begs the question, despite what he says about the possibility of miracles occurring. The main point is that he never describes a violation of the laws of nature that could not be explained by scientific theories.
165. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Anna Tomaszewska McDowell and Perceptual Reasons
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John McDowell claims that perception provides reasons for empirical beliefs. Perceptual reasons, according to the author of Mind and World, can be identifiedwith passively “taken in” facts. Concepts figure in the acts of acquiring perceptual reasons, even though the acts themselves do not consist in judgments. Thus,on my reading, McDowell’s account of the acquisition of reasons can be likened to Descartes’ account of the acquisition of ideas, rather than to Kant’s theory ofjudgment as an act by means of which one’s cognition comes to be endowed with objective validity. However, unlike Descartes, McDowell does not acknowledgethe skeptical challenge which his conception of the acquisition of reasons might face. He contends that perception is factive without arguing for the backgroundassumption (about a “perfect match” between mind and world) on which it rests. Hence, as I suggest in my article, the McDowellian claim that perception provides reasons for empirical beliefs is not sufficiently warranted.
166. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Mark McLeod-Harrison Relaxed Naturalism and Caring About the Truth
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Can our caring about truth be rooted in “relaxed” naturalism? I argue that it cannot. In order to care about truth we need the universe to be capable of providingnon-adventitious good, which relaxed naturalism cannot do. I use Michael Lynch’s work as a springboard to showing this claim.
reviews and notices
167. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Józef Bremer Hans Werhahn., Das Vorschreiten der Säkularisierung [The Progression of Secularization]
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168. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Konrad Werner Józef Bremer., Wprowadzenie do filozofii umysłu [Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind]
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169. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Tomasz Szubart Marcin Miłkowski and Robert Poczobut., Przewodnik po filozofii umysłu [Companion to the Philosophy of Mind]
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170. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Roman Darowski, S.J. In memoriam Piotr Lenartowicz SJ (1934–2012)
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171. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Andrzej Gielarowski The 9th Polish Congress of Philosophy (Gliwice–Katowice–Wisła, 17–21 September, 2012)—report
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172. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Zbigniew Jan Marczuk Dennett’s Account of Mind versus Kim’s Supervenience Argument
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This paper challenges Daniel Dennett’s attempt to reconcile the performance of mind and brain within a physicalist framework with Jaegwon Kim’s argument that a coherent physicalist framework entails the epiphenomenalism of mental events. Dennett offers a materialist explanation of consciousness and arguesthat his model of mind does not imply reductive physicalism. I argue that Dennett’s explanation of mind clashes with Jaegwon Kim’s mind-body supervenienceargument. Kim contends that non-reductive physicalism either voids the causal powers of mental properties, or it violates physicalist framework. I concludethat Dennett’s account of mind does not escape or overcome Kim’s mind/body supervenience problem. If Kim’s argument does not prove Dennett’s explanationof mind to be either a form of reductive materialism, or a logically inconsistent view, it is due to the ambiguity of concepts involved in Dennett’s theory.
173. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Jarosław Jagiełło Logos and faith in a “secular age” [Logos und Glaube im „secular age“. Zur Religionsphilosophischen Aktualität des Ebner´schen Denkens]
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174. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Mark Manolopoulos Today’s Truly Philosophical Philosopher of Religion
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What does it mean to be a truly philosophical philosopher of religion today? The paper proposes that the thinker of faith should pursue the following passions: (1) a passion for wonder and epistemic openness; (2) the desire for a rationality that exceeds narrow-minded hyper-rationalism; (3) an ecological pathosi.e. loving the Earth; (4) a passion for self-development; and (5) thinking and participating in ethical political-economic transformation, a revolutionary passion.And so, today’s truly philosophical philosopher of religion would pursue a cognitively rigorous, engaged, and experientially adventurous venture in thinking.
175. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Kazimierz Rynkiewicz The virtuous Person’s Lucky Path to Success [Der Glückliche Weg zum Erfolg Eines Tugendhaften]
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In this paper I seek to analyse the following question: How is it that I am able, today, to succeed in fulfilling my goals? My analysis will, I hope, demonstratethat virtues are important because they facilitate this sort of fulfilment. An examination of the classical notion of virtue is thus called for, and this in turn suggests that, at least in certain cases, virtue is connected with luck – that these two belong together. This points towards a new form of contemporary virtue ethics,whose distinctive character will be reflected in the particular significance it invests in the concepts of “qualification” and “competence”. Finally, we are ledto Wittgenstein’s assertion that “The world of the happy person is other than the world of the hapless person”.
176. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Rob Lovering Does Ordinary Morality Imply Atheism? A Reply to Maitzen
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Stephen Maitzen has recently argued that ordinary morality implies atheism. In the following, I argue that the soundness of Maitzen’s argument depends ona principle that is implausible, what I call the Recipient’s Benefit Principle: All else being equal, if an act A produces a net benefit for the individual on the receiving end of A, then one cannot have a moral obligation to prevent A. Specifically, the Recipient’s Benefit Principle (RBP) must be true if premise (2) of Maitzen’s argument is to be true. But, RBP is likely false, as it generates counterintuitive implications as well as conflicts with another principle both plausible and seemingly adopted by most of us, what I call the Preventing Immorality Principle: All else being equal, if an act A is seriously immoral, then one has a moral obligation to prevent A.
177. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Eric Baldwin On Buddhist and Taoist Morality
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Arthur Danto argues that all Eastern philosophies – except Confucianism – fail to accept necessary conditions on genuine morality: a robust notionof agency and that actions are praiseworthy only if performed voluntarily, in accordance with rules, and from motives based on the moral worth and well-beingof others. But Danto’s arguments fail: Neo-Taoism and Mohism satisfy these allegedly necessary constraints and Taoism and Buddhism both posit moral reasons that fall outside the scope of Danto’s allegedly necessary conditions on genuine morality. Thus, our initial reaction, that these Eastern philosophies offer genuine moral reasons for action, is sustained rather than overturned.
178. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Maria Kłańska The Significance of Spinoza and His Philosophy for the Life and Poetry of the German-Jewish Poetess Rose Ausländer [Spinoza und Seine Philosophie im Schaffen der Deutschsprachigen Dichterin Rose Ausländer]
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The German-Jewish writer and poetess, Rose Ausländer (1901-1988), who came from Chernivtsi (Czernowitz), capital of Bukovina, one of the formerprovinces of the Hapsburg Empire, is one of the most+ highly acclaimed lyric poets to have written in German in the 20th century. Throughout her whole life shewas an adherent of the philosophy of Spinoza, first becoming acquainted with it in the so-called “ethics seminar” of the secondary-school teacher Friedrich Kettner. In the wake of the First World War the youth of Chernivtsi were in need of new sources of intellectual stimulation, so he set out to introduce them to the philosophy of Spinoza, as well as to that of Constantin Brunner, a contemporary German philosopher influenced by him.Rose Ausländer remained a follower of Spinoza right up to the end of her life. This is confirmed by her two very different poems of the same name, “Spinoza”– the first composed before 1939, the second in 1979 – as well as by her many explorations of topics drawn from his ethics, ranging from her very first printedpoem, “Amor Dei”, up to her lyrics written in old age, in the 1970s and 1980s. In this short paper I will attempt to chart the course of, and analyze, her interest inSpinoza´s philosophical system and life.
book reviews and notices
179. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Rafał Kupczak Irena Stasiewicz-Jasiukowa (ed.), The contribution of polish science and technology to world heritage (by Rafał Kupczak)
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180. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Kazimierz Rynkiewicz Wilhelm Vossenkuhl, Die Möglichkeit des Guten. Ethik im 21. Jahrhundert (by Kazimierz Rynkiewicz)
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