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Displaying: 21-30 of 519 documents


21. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 21
Richard E. Bennett Terrible as an Army with Banners
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This lecture discusses five flags which the Latter-Day Saints used from 1830 to 1848 in various parts of the United States to represent their early allegiances to God and to the United States. Despite the many problems in the relationship between the Latter-Day Saints and the American government at this time and in the decades to come, the Mormons clearly attempted to show that they could be loyal to both their faith and the political authority.
22. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 21
Byron DeLear Revisiting the Flag at Prospect Hill: Grand Union or Just British?
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Recent research has questioned whether the Grand Union flag (a.k.a. “Continental Colors”) really flew at Prospect Hill, Boston, on 1 January 1776. Eye­witness accounts use the term “union flag” and a new interpretation theorizes this to have referred specifically to the British Union Jack and not the characteristic “union flag with 13 red-and-white stripes.” This paper rebuts the new interpretation and supports the conventional history through an examination of eighteenth-century linguistic standards, contextual historical trends, and additional primary and secondary sources.
23. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 21
Steven A. Knowlton Contested Symbolism in the Flags of New World Slave Risings
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Covering a little-known subject, this article catalogues the use of flags within slave uprisings in the New World in the nineteenth century. The author demonstrates how the slave banners were typically modelled on the flags of their former masters but also often incorporated African symbols in an attempt to indicate physical freedom as well as the attempt to signal the former slave groups’ equality with their former oppressors.
24. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 21
Dean Thomas Flags and Emblems of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea: Vexillidolatry in its Purest Form
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This Driver Award-winning paper examines the use of vexillidolatry—the reverence of flags—in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea). The author demonstrates the deeply-held reverence to DPRK flags—national, political, and military—which North Koreans hold. This is not the result of political pressure, but more the result of the people’s view of the national flag as a symbol of independence and their strong and widely-displayed patriotism.
25. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 21
Contributors to This Issue
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26. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 20
Editor’s Notes
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27. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 20
John M. Hartvigsen The First Pledge in Utah
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This essay conveys the story of the first mass recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in Utah. The author demonstrates how the event was intended to demonstrate to the rest of the country that Mormans in Utah were loyal Americans.
28. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 20
Steven A. Knowlton Evocation and Figurative Thought in Tennessee Flag Culture
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This paper uses communication theory to study the flag culture of Tennessee. The author applies concepts such as semiotics, pragmatic unity, and visual synecdoche to the examination of flags and flag-derived logos used throughout the Volunteer State.
29. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 20
Anne M. Platoff Of Tablecloths and Soviet Relics: A Study of the Banner of Victory (Znamia Pobedy)
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This article provides a discussion of the Znamia Pobedy — the Soviet Banner of Victory from World War II — covering the sometimes contradictory stories behind the flag raised by Soviet soldiers over the Reichstag in Berlin. It also discusses post-war use in the U.S.S.R. and the countries of the former Soviet Union.
30. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 20
Catherine M. Wright Colors of the Confederacy: Consecration and Controversy
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This article provides a discussion of the flags of the Confederacy, illustrated by historical flags of the period. The author discusses how one flag pattern gained primacy in the South during the Civil War, and how that flag is viewed in contemporary U.S. culture.