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Displaying: 21-28 of 28 documents


session viii: truth
21. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 88
Michael Bowler Heidegger, Aristotle, and Philosophical Leisure
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I examine the two different accounts of the activity of philosophy and the nature of the philosophical life put forward by Heidegger and Aristotle. I do so by examining Heidegger’s well-known claim that for Aristotle sophia is the arete of techne. It is argued that this claim is the result of Heidegger’s deep engagement with critical philosophy, which his own early philosophy develops in interesting ways, and that this claim results in Heidegger overlooking crucial elements of Aristotle’s account of philosophy. I maintain that Aristotle’s conception of philosophy represents a counter-point to the critical conception of philosophy developed by Heidegger, one that focuses upon the importance of the leisure embodied in philosophical activity. I suggest that it would be especially fruitful to compare and contrast these two conceptions of philosophy from the perspective of the ethical question of the nature and value of philosophical activity and the life of philosophy.
22. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 88
Joshua Lee Harris Does Aquinas Hold a Correspondence Theory of Truth in De Veritate?
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At least since Martin Heidegger’s influential reading of Thomas Aquinas’s account of truth as a precursor to modern philosophy’s unfortunate “forgetfulness of being,” it has been popular to classify the Angelic Doctor as one of the fore­runners of the modern “correspondence theory” of truth. In what follows, I attempt to answer the question of whether or not this is a correct assessment. I want to suggest that Aquinas’s account of truth has superficial concord but deep conflict with modern correspondence theories. The argument proceeds in two major segments: First, I attempt to establish a working definition of correspondence theory by tracing its development in the work of John Locke, John Stuart Mill and Bertrand Russell. Next, in light of these fundamental features of correspondence theory, I sketch out the way in which Aquinas’s own account is in superficial concord but deep conflict with it.
acpa reports and minutes
23. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 88
R. E. Houser Minutes of the 2014 Executive Council Meeting
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24. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 88
R. E. Houser Secretary’s Report (2013–2014)
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25. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 88
Treasurer’s Report (2013)
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26. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 88
Financial Statements
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27. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 88
Necrology (2013–2015)
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28. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Volume > 88
Available Back Issues of the Proceedings
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