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Displaying: 21-40 of 58 documents


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21. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 3
David Burrell, C.S.C. A Postmodern Aquinas: The Oeuvre of Olivier-Thomas Venard, O.P.
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The oeuvre of Olivier-Thomas Venard, O.P. offers a sensitive delineation of the central role which Aquinas gives to language and its careful composition in pursuing his intellectual inquiry. By suggesting a way of aligning “medieval” modes of inquiry with “postmodern,” this study brings to light the inescapable role which the language of religious expression plays in Aquinas’s manner of leading us to understand recondite matters which he avows we are able at best to “imperfectly signify.” All of this contributes to the strategy of manuductio for which his work is celebrated, as well as accounting for the chiseled clarity of expression which continues to impresscommentators on his work and clearly distinguishes him from erstwhile peers. This manner of expression itself offers witness to that radical intellectual asceticism celebrated by Pierre Hadot: a benignly “postmodern” expression.
22. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 3
Matthew Levering Biblical Thomism and the Doctrine of Providence
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How should contemporary Thomistic theologians speak of providence and predestination? This essay suggests that St. Catherine of Siena’s approach to the doctrine provides a model for Thomistic theology today. After examining biblical teaching and the guidelines proposed by the Catechism of the Catholic Church, I explore in some detail the positions of Hans Urs von Balthasar and Jacques Maritain, both of whom sought to overcome what they perceived to be difficulties in the Thomistic account of predestination. I conclude by proposing a retrieval of the perspective of St. Catherine of Siena.
23. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 3
Fred Lawrence Lonergan’s Retrieval of Thomas Aquinas’s Conception of the Imago Dei: The Trinitarian Analogy of Intelligible Emanations in God
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This paper sets forth and advocates Bernard Lonergan’s understanding of Aquinas’s use of “intelligible emanations” as an analogy for processions in the Trinity. It argues that some of Lonergan’s views on consciousness, understanding, phronesis, and judgement are similar to views expressed in Hans-Georg Gadamer’s Truth and Method and John Henry Newman’s An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent.
24. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 3
Eileen C. Sweeney Seeing Double: Thomas Aquinas and the Problem of Modernity through the Continental Lens
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This essay focuses on three interpretations of Aquinas influenced by Continental philosophy, those of John Caputo, Jean-Luc Marion, and John Milbank/Catherine Pickstock. The essay considers the well-worn question, whether Aquinas is an onto-theologian in Heidegger’s sense, but looks more broadly at the point of contact common to these interpretations: Aquinas’s relationship to modernity.As Continental thought has put into question the nature of philosophy through a critical look at modern philosophy—questioning its self-representation as progress and characterizing the present as post-modern—Aquinas is of interest to Continental thought in his anti-modernity. The author considers three issues: (1) What does Continental philosophy bring to the study of Aquinas missing from analytic approaches? (2) What is highlighted about Aquinas as he is seen by Caputo, Marion, and Milbank/Pickstock? (3) Can Aquinas escape both the limitations of modernism and the deconstruction of postmodernism, as some claim, and would he want to?
25. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 3
Kevin L. Flannery, S.J. The Division of Action in Thomas Aquinas
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Aquinas accepts that (i) some kinds of voluntary action are (qua voluntary) “basic,” not divisible into (non-fictional) further kinds; (ii) a concrete individual action may belong to more than one basic kind; (iii) the basic kinds to which it belongs are determined by the agent’s intentions qua performing the action; (iv) some intentions may stand to others as means to ends; (v) there can be concrete individual actions in which the agent’s intended means are disordered with respect to the ends; (vi) such actions are morally wrong; (vii) whether a given intention is disordered as means to a given end is determined solely by the natures of the agent and of the intended means or ends. Together, these propositions entail that, pace many analytic philosophers, concrete individual actions can have a moral wrongness that consists neither in expectation of disutility nor in violation of the pure logic of practical reason.
26. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 3
Tracey Rowland Augustinian and Thomist Engagements with the World
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Neither Augustine nor Aquinas can accept a political order in which religious doctrine as such is barred from serving as an explicit basis of political, legal, and economic norms. Certain twentieth-century commentators indebted (wittingly or not) to Kantianism or to other Enlightenment ideologies ignored this fact, or minimized its importance. Aquinas was misread as a forerunner of modern liberal democracy; Augustine was portrayed, with equal injustice, as seeking to dissuade Christians from participation in the political arena. In reality, the political philosophy of each is consistent with a robust Christian presence in the public square, and is incompatible both with theocracy and with the modern secular state. A better understanding of the distance separating these philosopher-theologians from some of their prominent twentieth-century commentators may shed light on the history of the reception of Vatican II’s Gaudium et spes.
27. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 3
Books Received
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28. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 2
Juan F. Franck The “Divine” and the Human Person in Rosmini’s Thought
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Rosmini’s philosophy is a comprehensive effort toward the renovation of Christian thought in modern times. An intense discussion of the problem of knowledge led him to reformulate Augustine’s theory of illumination in terms of the ideal presence of universal being to the mind. Universal being is the lumen intellectus and our mind’s first object: it is implied in all our thoughts and makes them possible. Although devoid of reality, it shows remarkable features, such as infinity, necessity, and eternity. Without being God, it may be called “divine,” and confers a special value to intelligent creatures, whose dignity comes from their being enlightened by universal being. The “divine” is also the seal of God’s presence in nature. The present article supports the logic of this argument.
29. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 2
John R. White Doctrinal Development and the Philosophy of History: Cardinal Newman’s Theory in the Light of Eric Voegelin’s Philosophy
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The following paper has two primary purposes. First it aims to articulate a theoretical proposition in general terms, namely, that every theory of doctrinal development presupposes a philosophy of history. The underlying significance of this proposition is that theories of doctrinal development are simultaneously narratives of the historical significance of the church’s pilgrimage through history, though that fact typically remains implicit in theories of doctrinal development. The second purpose is to illustrate the general proposition by analyzing a particularcase. I have therefore outlined some of the salient features of John Henry Cardinal Newman’s theory of doctrinal development and, using ideas from Eric Voegelin’s philosophy, show how it implies a philosophy of history.
30. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 2
Matthew I. Burch The Twinkling of an Eye: Kierkegaard and Heidegger on the Possibility of Faith
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In this paper I challenge the received view of the relationship between Kierkegaard and Heidegger and explore the relationship between phenomenology and theology. Against the received view—the familiar claim that Heidegger “secularizes” Kierkegaard—I argue that both philosophers attempt to uncover the existential conditions for the possibility of an authentic existence and take the passionate religious life to be one form of such an existence. Therefore, Heidegger’s concept of resoluteness does not represent a secularized break with but rather aphenomenological development of Kierkegaard’s concept of inwardness; and both concepts represent a mode of existence that is the condition for the possibility of genuine Christian faith. This grounding relationship between resoluteness and faith, I argue, is representative of Heidegger’s view of the relationship between phenomenological and theological concepts in general. Thus, my argument not only sheds light onHeidegger’s development of Kierkegaard but it also clarifies some important features of the relationship between phenomenology and theology.
31. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 2
James A. Montmarquet Jaspers, the Axial Age, and Christianity
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Karl Jaspers celebrates the “Axial Age” as marking a fundamental advance in humanity’s self-understanding, but rejects Christianity as “fettering” this new enlightenment to a notion of Jesus as the sole incarnation of the divine. Here I try to show that, relative to Jaspers’ own account of Existenz and especially of existential “foundering,” Jesus becomes distinctive in a way that Socrates, Buddha, and Confucius are not (even on Jaspers’ own accounts of these four “paradigmatic individuals”). I go on to show how, on Karl Rahner’s inclusivist account of theincarnation, Jaspers’ objections to Christianity mostly dissolve. Finally, I suggest the need to recognize two Axial Age traditions: one rejecting sacrificial forms in favor of ethical prescriptions, the other finding new ethical meaning in these older forms.
32. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 2
Robert D. Anderson The Moral Permissibility of Accepting Bad Side Effects
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How exactly is accepting the bad side effects of good choices morally defensible? The best defense to date is by Joseph Boyle, John Finnis, and Germain Grisez and relies on the claim that bad side effects are unavoidable. But are they? Three accounts of why bad side effects are unavoidable—one by John Zeis, a second by Boyle, Finnis, and Grisez jointly, and a third by Boyle independently—are examined and rejected. Next, an alternative proposal which suggests bad side effects are always avoidable is also examined and rejected. Finally, an adequate account of why bad side effects are unavoidable is presented and defended. This defense relies on certain facts about the goods which human agents ultimately find fulfilling and about human agents’ attempts to instantiate those goods through various projects.
review essays
33. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 2
John N. Deely In the Twilight of Neothomism, a Call for a New Beginning—A Return in Philosophy to the Idea of Progress by Deepening Insight Rather than by Substitution: A Review of The Way toward Wisdom
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With a few exceptions, the relation of modern science to medieval natural philosophy is a question that has been largely shunned in the Neothomistic era, in favor of a preoccupation with establishing a “realist metaphysics” that has no need for science in the modern sense nor, for that matter, any need for natural philosophy either. Fr. Ashley’s work confronts this narrow preoccupation head-on, arguing that, in the view of St. Thomas himself, there can be no human wisdom which leaves aside scientific development. Ashley even goes so far as to point the way tothe possible development of philosophy beyond the terms of the realist / idealist framework in which Neothomism had its say.
34. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 2
Charles G. Nauert Humanist and Critic: A Review of Collected Works of Erasmus, Volumes 35 and 36 (ed. John N. Grant) and Volume 45 (ed. Robert Sider)
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Erasmus’s Adages were among his most influential works in his own time, particularly later editions, which included both Greek and Latin. In the adages included in volumes 35 and 36, Erasmus criticizes secular and ecclesiastical life, commenting on topics such as war, reform of the church and spiritual life, and the corrupting effects of the relentless pursuit of wealth and power. Erasmus aims his narrative and commentary in Paraphrase on the Gospel of Matthew (volume 45) at a general educated audience (rather than professional theologians). Together, these volumes provide readable and accurate edition of Erasmus’s work and helpful special indexes.
book reviews
35. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 2
Geoffrey Karabin A Commentary of Gabriel Marcel’s The Mystery of Being
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36. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 2
Jason T. Eberl Double-Effect Reasoning: Doing Good and Avoiding Evil
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37. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 2
Justin Skirry Descartes: A Biography
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38. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 2
Desmond J. FitzGerald The Malebranche Moment: Selections from the Letters of Etienne Gilson and Henri Gouhier
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39. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 2
Robert E. Wood The Heart: An Analysis of Human and Divine Affectivity
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40. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 2
James Flaherty Styles of Thought: Interpretation, Inquiry, and Imagination
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