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21. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
Crossword
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22. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
An Interview with Richard Sorabji
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23. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
William Grey Hume, Miracles, and the Paranorrnal
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24. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Howard Sankey Five Varieties of Cognitive Relativisrn
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25. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Jamie T. Whyte Relativisrn is Absolutely False
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26. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Alec Fisher Exercises in non-formal logic: specimen analysis of exercise 1 (Ayer), plus exercise 2 (Dawkins)
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27. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Anne Thomson Page Three - to ban or not to ban?
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28. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Piers Benn Pornography, Degradation and Rhetoric
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29. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Paul Davis Drearning On: Malcolm and the coherence principle
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30. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Christopher Ormell A Modern Cogito 3: unpredictability and the other
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In the first paper of this series (Cogito, 1992) the author outlined ‘the showdown phenomenon’: a live sequence of events of two distinct kinds, ‘red’ and ‘green’, which was experienced by the would-be predictor as absolutely and irreducibly unpredictable, because the predictor invariably got his or her predictions wrong. (In a second paper (Cogito, 1993) he argued that the showdown phenomenon is an epistemological landmark, because it establishes a clearly conceptualized, tangible, localized ‘limit of knowledge’.) At the end of the original paper the author remarked that if we actually experienced suchabsolute, relentless unpredictability, we would infer the existence of another ‘out there’ doing this to us ... In the current paper he returns to this ontological aspect of the new Cogito and fills out some of the thinking which lies behind it.
31. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Beverley Duckworth Is Aid to Third World Countries a Matter of Justice?
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32. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Thomas Bittner Probability and Infinite Sets
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33. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Mary Haight Gunddh 2
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book review
34. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Andrew Harrison Music and the Emotions: the Philosophical Theories
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35. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Adam Morton Consciousness Explained
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36. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Christopher Bertram A Hegel Dictionary
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37. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Editor’s Booknotes
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article
38. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Philosophy News
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39. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Letter to the Editor
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40. Cogito: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Puzzles and Posers
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