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Displaying: 21-40 of 123 documents


business ethics
21. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Jeanne M. Logsdon, Jacqueline N. Hood, Michelle Detry Bullying in the Workplace: Challenges to Preserving Ethical Organization
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Workplace bullying is defined as repeated, malicious, and health-endangering mistreatment of an employee by one or more other employees. Workplace bullying has been associated with negative outcomes for the individual being bullied and for the organization in which such actions take place. This paper explains the nature, frequency, and costs of workplace bullying in the context of organizational culture, ethical culture, and organizational moral development. We also propose ways that organizations can and should deal with this increasingly common behavior.
22. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Mary Grace Neville Positive Deviance on the Ethical Continuum: Green Mountain Coffee as a Case Study in Conscientious Capitalism
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Increasingly, stories are emerging about businesses that engage in ethical behaviors above and beyond mere compliance with regulations. These positive deviations along the ethical continuum provide an opportunity to explore how some companies’ business philosophy leads them to pursue an array of outcomes beyond the bottom line. This paper presents a case study of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, the leading ethical company in the U.S. as rated by Forbes magazine, exploring the company culture and operating philosophy from a perspective of the author calls conscientious capitalism, a paradigm based on three interdependent assumptions: interconnectedness, holistic wealth, and multiple generations of time. Considerations discussed for future research.
23. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Eleanor O’Higgins, Patrick E. Murphy When Does Business Ethics Pay - And When Doesn’t It?
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This paper examines moral misconduct and recidivism at the corporate level. We analyze the factors that facilitate moral transgressions and why some companies appear to be serial offenders. We propose that negative learning is a core process that encourages repeat misconduct. We offer a framework of negative learning, grounded in a case example. The framework also suggests circumstances that reverse the vicious selfreinforcing cycle of negative learning, so companies learn to adopt a more ethical stance when faced with moral choices.
24. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Mary D. Sass, Matthew Liao-Troth Person Values and Negotiation Performance
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In this exploratory study, we look at the professed values that people have, and their performance in a negotiation. We found relations between Schwartz values and conflict handling behaviors, and distributive, integrative, and compatible negotiation outcomes in a controlled environment using Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM) analysis.
25. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
George W. Watson, Joseph Michlitsch, Thomas Douglas Patterned Moral Behavior: A New Approach to Practice and Research in Organizational Ethics
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We posit that the weight a person assigns a moral principle is not stable between ideal, or un-contextual assessments and the weight the same moral principle is allocated when applied in a contextual dilemma. Second, we postulate that past behavior is the best predictor of future behavior or judgment. Results indicate that the importance of moral principles is dynamic and that patterned moral behavior is a significant predictor of moral judgments.
26. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Michelle Westermann-Behaylo, Tracy M. Davis Escaping the Ethical Incident Pit
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This research project defines the concept of an ethical incident pit and explores how qualitative and quantitative research into corporate ethical failurescan be conducted using this concept. Factors on an organizational, departmental and individual level are explored.
corporate social responsibility and social performance
27. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Oana Apostol, Salme Näsi, Matias Laine Emerging Corporate Social Responsibility Thinking in Developing Countries: Increased Societal Expectations or Process of Knowledge Transfer?
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This paper looks at the current state-of-the-art and at potential changes in CSR thinking in a developing country: Romania. It seeks to understand what kind oftransformations are emerging in this field and what are the reasons behind them. The analysis is interpretative, using discourse analysis and focuses on the articles of the weekly Romanian business publication Capital. The results indicate that the local business environment features the characteristics of wild capitalism, largely contradicting the idea of responsibility. However, foreign actors have recently entered the local environment, acting as travelling vehicles of Western ideas and inducing positive developments in business social behaviour. This study upholds that emerging trends in the business social thinking in Romania are not an outcome of local societal expectations but, rather, are brought from abroad and sold to the local community.
28. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Martina Battisti The Unconscious Element of Corporate Citizenship: A Psychoanalytical Perspective
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29. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Leeora D. Black, Lori Cordingley Can Social Responsiveness Capabilities Deliver Competitive Advantage in Industry Settings? An Empirical Study of the Electricity Generation Industry in Victoria, Australia
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This paper tests a model of corporate social responsiveness capabilities in an industry setting. It seeks to understand whether corporate social responsiveness can be a source of competitive advantage for a given company in an industry where participants face similar constraints and issues.
30. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Cynthia Clark Williams Influences on the Scope of Corporate Disclosure Programs: Preliminary Findings
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This paper provides a framework for beginning the discussion of how and why corporate disclosure programs vary in their scope. It posits that managerial agency along with certain external forces, such as disclosure regulations, will affect the scope and managerial commitment to a broad or narrow disclosure program scope. Preliminary findings are presented in brief form.
31. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Mark Cordano, Stephanie Welcomer, Andrew Griffiths The Benefits of Structural Equation Modeling for Developing and Testing Corporate Social Performance Theory
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Studies of corporate social performance (CSP) research indicate the critical importance of research design and methodology in developing and testing CSP theories. In this paper we analyze data from a study of environmental performance in the U.S. wine industry to demonstrate how the research methodologies can cause researchers to reach different theoretical conclusions from the same data. We conclude that structural equation modeling (SEM) offers CSP researchers valuable tools that can accommodate critical theory development needs.
32. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Jonathan P. Doh, Terrence R. Guay Evaluating the Impact of NGO Activism of Corporate Social Responsibility: Cases from Europe and the United States
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We argue that differences in the institutional setting of Europe and the US is the critical factor in understanding policymaking in Europe and the United States, and particularly the influence of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). To test this relationship between institutional differences, corporate social responsibility (CSR), and NGO activism, we investigate 12 cases involving US and European companies in each of three industries. We conclude that different institutional structures and political legacies in the US and Europe are important factors in explaining the influence of NGOs on business and in the policymaking process, regardless of the timeliness of corporate strategy or NGO influence.
33. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Yves Fassin Hypocrisy, Idealism and Serendipity in “Corporate Governance and CSR” Communication and Ethics
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Recent communication and discussion concerning corporate governance, CSR, codes of conduct and other ethical policies have restored the tarnished reputation of the business world which followed a spate of financial scandals. However, one also notices an increased dissonance between the attractive messages emanating from business leaders and the reality. This disconnection between the ‘CSR rhetoric and corporate governance ethics’ and the practical reality experienced within companies leads to hypocrisy. The reality seems too often in contradiction with the idealistic character of corporate communication.In our paper, we analyse the impact of communication and perception on the image and reputation of the company. We survey the characteristics of the media, which include lack of nuance and the tendency to generalization, amplification and reduction. We confront the hypocrisy in the contradiction between words and deeds, and briefly analyse the reasons for this disconnection between message and reality. The continuum from idealism to hypocrisy to position a company in function of the degree of congruence or dissonance between communication and reality forms the basis for a sincerity index.
34. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
David Ferguson, Lance Moir What are the Key Factors That Affect the Design of Corporate Responsibility Performance Measurement Systems?
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This paper presents findings from a literature review exploring the operationalisation issues for corporate responsibility performance and corporate responsibility performance measurement systems (CR-PMS). It concludes with a synthesis for the key comparative aspects of a CR-PMS and a traditional PMS in terms of the metric and systems perspective. In light of the sparse academic literature on the specific topic, this paper proposes a new categorical tool, the Ten Factor Framework for the design of CR-PMS, which has both academic and practitioner applications.
35. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Naomi A. Gardberg, Donald H. Schepers Awareness: The Missing Link Between Corporate Social Performance and Performance
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This study seeks to examine the mechanism by which a corporation’s use of philanthropy might affect its reputation for CSP. We propose and test a model relating corporate philanthropy and foundations to awareness of and evaluations of firm social responsibility. We find that the relationships are more perplexing than others have proposed. Our contention that corporate philanthropy is a complex variable is upheld and we propose avenues for future research.
36. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Colin Higgins, Tyler Wry Business and Society Scholarship: Fit to be Institutionalized?
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This short paper introduces institutional theory to some long-standing questions about business and society theory. Specifically, institutional theory would seem to offer some potential for understanding why business organisations may adopt CSR practices for non-instrumental reasons.
37. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Carola Hillenbrand, Kevin Money Advising the Practitioner: How Academics Can Shed Light on the “What, How, and Why of Corporate Responsibility”
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Theorists and practitioners in the fields of both Corporate Responsibility and Corporate Reputation have recently stressed the importance of taking a stakeholderperspective when researching the nature, development and impact of these concepts. While models of Corporate Reputation, such as the Reputation Quotient and SPIRIT were developed by actively engaging stakeholders in research, models of Corporate Responsibility have been developed in a more theoretical manner. There have thus been calls for the research approaches taken in reputation research to be applied to the field of responsibility. This paper answers these calls and thereby provides two related outcomes: First, a conceptualisation of Corporate Responsibility is developed that draws directly upon stakeholder perceptions (in this case customers and employees of a financial institution). Secondly, a comparison between this conceptualisation and two existing models of Corporate Reputation is conducted. A formal comparison between the model of Corporate Responsibility developed in this paper and the RQ and SPIRIT models of Corporate Reputation suggests that there are considerable similarities between stakeholder conceptualisations of responsibility and models of reputation.Stakeholders may therefore not view responsibility separate from reputation, but rather as a largely overlapping concept. Questions about the causal relationship between the two concepts are also discussed.
38. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Carola Hillenbrand, Kevin Money Corporate Responsibility and Corporate Reputation: Two Separate Concepts or Two Sides of the Same Coin?
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In response to the IABS conference theme to “advise practitioners,” this paper is framed in terms of two questions that have been found to be critical to practitioners. These are “what is Corporate Responsibility and how to do it” and “what is the value of Corporate Responsibility.” The paper uses theories from within the academic literature to develop a model to answer these two practitioner-based questions. An empirical framework based upon the model is developed and tested with a study of customers of a financial service organisation in the UK.
39. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Richard Hudson Canadian Corporate Social Responsibility Reports: Practitioner Responses to (Selected) Academic Ideas
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This paper investigates the interpretation of Corporate Social Responsibility found in reports by corporations. Data was collected from websites of Canadiancorporations figuring in the S&P/TSX 60 stock market index. Following some simple descriptions of the reports, three brief analyses are conducted. First the structure of the reports is analyzed. Then word use is investigated. Finally the use of pictures in the reports is analyzed.
40. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Dima Jamali, Sarah Wazzi, Chirine Chehab The Need for a Systematic Approach to Corporate Social Responsibility
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In the context of the recent ascendancy of CSR, the spotlight has been primarily focused on the business sector, with sharp escalations in expectations of socialinvolvement and contributions throughout both the industrialized and developing world. These rising expectations can be reasonably understood and framed in the context of the expanded global reach and influence of the private sector, and acute market failures and governance gaps in developing countries for which the corporate sector is able to compensate. This paper argues however that a narrow focus on the private sector in the pursuit of CSR is potentially short-sighted. To scale-up the beneficial impact of individual CSR activities, a more systemic approach to CSR is required, capitalizing on the joint effort and creative interactions between four key actors, including a) business and industry; b) institutions of governance; c) the non-governmental; sector and d) the scientific and research community. The paper also presents an exploratory survey of the perceptions of the different actors of their respective roles, responsibilities, strengths andweaknesses in the pursuit of CSR based on a qualitative empirical study conducted in the Lebanese context.