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Displaying: 21-30 of 51 documents


articles
21. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 53 > Issue: 3
Charles A. Hobbs Reconsidering John Dewey’s Relationship with Ancient Philosophy
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There has been little scholarly attention to the tension within Dewey’s comments on the ancients. On the one hand, Dewey’s polemics condemn the lasting influence of Greek philosophers as deleterious. He charges the Greeks with originating a quest (“the quest for certainty”) that has led Western philosophy into such dualisms as reason and emotion, mind and nature, individual and community, and theory and practice. On the other hand, Dewey often has many sympathetic things to say about the Greeks. Taking account of the limited scholarship done on this topic, this essay articulates the dimensions of the tension and tries to put it into a Deweyan perspective.
book reviews
22. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 53 > Issue: 3
Raymond Dennehy Reason Fulfilled by Revelation: The 1930s Christian Philosophy Debates in France. Edited and translated by Gregory B. Sadler
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23. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 53 > Issue: 3
Brian Gregor Kierkegaard and the Quest for Unambiguous Life: Between Romanticism and Modernism: Selected Essays. By George Pattison
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24. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 53 > Issue: 3
Brendan Palla Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value. By John Martin Fischer
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25. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 53 > Issue: 3
Joseph W. Koterski, S.J. Ethical Reflections on the Financial Crisis 2007 / 2008: Making Use of Smith, Musgrave, and Rajan. By Wilfried Ver Eecke
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26. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 53 > Issue: 3
Books Received
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articles
27. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 53 > Issue: 2
About Our Contributors
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28. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 53 > Issue: 2
Michael Hector Storck Arts and Artifacts: An Aristotelian Approach
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In this paper I consider the nature of artifacts by looking at them as essentially connected with art in the broad sense of τέχvη or ars. After discussing the natural and the artificial in the light of Aristotle’s definition of nature in Physics II.1, I discuss artifacts using Aristotle’s definition of art in Nicomachean Ethics VI.4. This approach to artifacts is able to include not only paintings, poems, and plays but also found works of art, for there are some arts, such as navigation, whose making consists in finding rather than physical alteration. In addition to accommodating all the different sorts of artifacts that are produced by human making, approaching artifacts in this way implies that being an artifact does not distinguish any one kind of being. Rather, all artifacts essentially result from and thus relate to human making understood as action directed at something apart from the maker.
29. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 53 > Issue: 2
David W. Rodick Gabriel Marcel and American Philosophy
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Gabriel Marcel’s thought is deeply informed by the American philosophical tradition. Marcel’s earliest work focused upon the idealism of Josiah Royce. By the time Marcel completed his Royce writings, he had moved beyond idealism and adopted a form of metaphysical realism attributed to William Ernest Hocking. Marcel also developed a longstanding relationship with the American philosopher Henry Bugbee. These important philosophical relationships will be examined through the Marcellian themes of ontological exigence, intersubjective being, and secondary reflection. Marcel’s relationships with these philosophers are not serendipitous. They are expressions of Marcel’s deep Christian faith.
30. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 53 > Issue: 2
Joan Vergés Gifra Methodological Eclecticism in Practical Philosophy: Why It Would Be Better to Avoid It
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Methodological eclecticism has gained wide acceptance among practical philosophers in recent years. This paper analyzes and evaluates the strongest justifications supporting such a methodology: the primacy of practice thesis and the doctrine of value pluralism. Our aim is to show that methodological eclecticism cannot be justified by either of these considerations.