Cover of Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics
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Displaying: 21-40 of 64 documents


book review
21. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Eboni Marshall Turman Solidarity and Defiant Spirituality: Africana Lessons on Religion, Racism, and Ending Violence
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22. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Laurie Cassidy Cut in Stone: Confederate Monuments and Theological Disruption
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23. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Sarah Moses Abortion and the Christian Tradition: A Pro-Choice Theological Ethic
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24. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Abbylyn Helgevold U.S. Moral Theology from the Margins
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25. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Marcus Mescher A Just Peace Ethic Primer: Building Sustainable Peace and Breaking Cycles of Violence
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26. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Robyn Boeré The Fullness of Free Time: A Theological Account of Leisure and Recreation in the Moral Life
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27. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Matthew Webber Faith for Earth: A Call for Action
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28. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Kusumita P. Pedersen Ecotheology: A Christian Conversation
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29. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Emily Dumler-Winckler Following Jesus in a Culture of Fear: Choosing Trust over Safety in an Anxious Age
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30. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Kirk J. Nolan Christian Character Formation: Lutheran Studies of the Law, Anthropology, Worship, and Virtue
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31. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Lawrence M. Stratton The Making of Stanley Hauerwas: Bridging Barth and Postliberalism
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32. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
M. Therese Lysaught Blood in the Fields: Óscar Romero, Catholic Social Teaching, and Land Reform
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33. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Matthew R. Petrusek Towards a Critical Political Ethics: Catholic Ethics and Social Challenges
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34. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Rebekah Miles Reinhold Niebuhr in the 1960s: Christian Realism for a Secular Age
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35. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Myles Werntz The Analogy of Love: St. Maximus The Confessor and the Foundations of Ethics
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36. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2
Maria Russell Kenney Heaven’s Passport: Designing Your Biblical Passport for a Fuller Life
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preface
37. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 1
Scott Paeth Preface
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selected essays
38. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 1
Joe Blosser And It Was Good: Building an Ethics of Sufficiency
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To follow Jesus’s command to love our neighbors in our neoliberal age, Christians must cultivate new theological and economic stories that urge practices of sufficiency—ways of living with “enough.” The neoliberal version of the United States’s origin story of the American Dream, built on individual responsibility and meritocracy, knows no end to monetary accumulation. And the ways neoliberal rationality colors the Christian creation story can reinforce the drive toward endless accumulation. There are ways of living and practicing Christian stories, however, that can cultivate the kind of communities that form people to know how to say “enough.” This article argues that there is no genuine community, service to others, or love of neighbor if Christians cannot live out of these new stories that cultivate an ethics of sufficiency. Economically privileged Christians cannot love our lower-income neighbors if we continue to participate in a rationality that encourages limitless economic acquisition.
39. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 1
Cara Curtis “No One Left Behind”: Learning From A Multidimensional Ethic of Care in a Women’s Prison in the US South
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Drawing on qualitative research in a theological studies program at a women’s prison, this paper describes a multidimensional ethic of care practiced by the program’s students. Analyzing this ethic, the paper distills three virtues that the students’ practice offers to non-incarcerated persons seeking to advance care and justice in the world: attention, outward-looking self-care, and steadfastness. Through this analysis, the paper makes two main contributions, building on multiple strands of work in everyday ethics and the ethics of care: 1) it explores the moral and pedagogic value of incarcerated women’s ethical practices, and in doing so aims to unsettle assumptions about “where ethics happens,” particularly virtue ethics, and who are qualified ethical teachers; 2) in discussing a care ethic embedded in a carceral context, it furthers the case for ethics of care that are robustly and explicitly tied to the pursuit of justice.
40. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 41 > Issue: 1
Amy Levad Of Tragedies and Myths: Subsidiarity and Common-Pool Resource Institutions in Response to Environmental Degradation
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A pragmatic turn in Christian ecological ethics and theology suggests a practical approach that draws on the strengths of each of the dominant strategies for responding to environmental degradation: government regulation, privatization, and appeals to conscience. The principle of subsidiarity in Catholic social tradition (CST), which calls for a robust social order that integrates the roles of agents on various levels of society, while delegating specific responsibilities to each level, may provide normative direction for discerning when, how, and why to employ these strategies in response to environmental degradation. This principle recommends the development of effective intermediate institutions to mitigate excessive state and economic power and to serve as outlets for organizing and channeling individual agency, yet CST has not sufficiently fleshed out what such institutions look like, especially when responding to environmental degradation. The work of Nobel-winning political scientist Elinor Ostrom may correct this difficulty with her description of eight design principles of intermediate institutions in numerous ecological, social, cultural, political, and economic contexts.