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Displaying: 21-40 of 1860 documents


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21. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
William Hubbard The Preferential Option for the Poor and Participation: A Challenge for Catholic Health Care
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Catholic health care has long been focused on the needs of the poor, yet its primary interaction with the poor is in the delivery of health care and not within leadership. The preferential option for the poor is one tool that leads to greater participation. Especially important is the hermeneutic element that Pope Francis emphasizes. While some government programs already include those who are poor in leadership, Catholic health care is only starting to grapple with the Pope’s challenge. This essay explores inclusion of the poor in governance and strategic planning, revealing a better way to engage with those who are poor and give a better witness to the Gospel mandate for Catholic health care.
articles
22. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
Joseph O’Neil, Derryl Miller Growth-Attenuation Therapy for Children with Profound Cognitive and Physical Disabilities
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The use of growth attenuation therapy (GAT) is becoming more common in order to enable a family to care for a child with profound cognitive and physical disabilities (PCPD) as they age into adulthood. The first published study on the use of GAT was done with the family of a six-year-old girl with PCPD by Daniel Gunther and Douglas Diekema in Pediatrics in 2006. The ethical application of GAT generated considerable discussion on the use among children with PCPD in the medical and ethics communities. This paper discusses the use of GAT for children with profound cognitive and physical disabilities from a Catholic bioethics perspective.
23. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
Nicholas M. Ramirez Teleology and the Problem of Bodily-Rights Arguments
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In this paper I argue that teleology and a proper teleological analysis of the uterus is important for a comprehensive understanding of the rights of the unborn. I argue that a right to life entails the right to use those organs that naturally function for an individual’s survival. Consequently, an unborn child has a right to his mother’s uterus. If this is accepted, bodily-rights arguments for abortion such as those proposed by Judith Jarvis Thomson and David Boonin are completely undermined. While Thomson and Boonin may be justified in arguing the right to life does not always entail the right to use another person’s body, I argue that the right to life of the unborn does entail the right to use their mother’s body.
24. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
Timothy Furlan Alan Donagan and the Fundamental Principle of Judeo-Christian Morality
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Alan Donagan, in The Theory of Morality, famously claims that the principles of “common morality” (i.e., the morality of the Judeo-Christian tradition) form a consistent system that can be derived from a single fundamental principle: It is impermissible not to respect every human being, oneself or any other, as a rational creature. In particular, I want to show that the prohibition contained in the fundamental principle is interpreted by appeal to prior convictions about particular sorts of cases, whether they involve the violation of “respect” or not, and that this has unfavorable consequences for Donagan’s claim that the principles of common morality form a truly deductive system of morality.
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25. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
Pope Francis Message to Participants in the WOOB International: Congress on “The ‘Billings Revolution’ 70 Years Later: From Fertility to Personalized Medicine
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notes & abstracts
26. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
Stacy Trasancos Science
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27. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
Vince A. Punzo Medicine
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28. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
Christopher Kaczor Philosophy and Theology
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book reviews
29. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
Jozef Zalot To Die Is Gain: A Theological (re-)Introduction to the Sacrament of Anointing for Clergy, Laity, Caregivers, and Everyone Else by Roger W. Nutt
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30. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1
Costanza Raimondi Illness, Pain, and Health Care in Early Christianity by Helen Rhee
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31. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 4
Edward J. Furton In this issue
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32. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 4
Colloquy
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33. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 4
Arina O. Grossu Washington Insider
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essays
34. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 4
Elena Kraus, Cara Buskmiller The Experience of Catholic Physicians: Converting Misconceptions to Conversations
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Catholic physicians who believe that the Church offers a positive, intellectually compelling, and beautiful religion have a unique experience in their work and life. These physicians often encounter a particular difficulty related to mischaracterization of Catholic doctrines as restrictive, impersonal, or even disrespectful of human freedom. Multiple physician stories are briefly recounted as examples of these experiences. This difficulty is most painfully encountered when professional colleagues absorb scandal, factual errors about the teachings, negative stereotypes, or incompatible ideologies. The Catholic physician can address this difficulty with tact, witness, and gentle discussion of Catholic doctrine and the natural consequences of ethical and ideological missteps in mainstream medicine.
35. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 4
Christopher K. Bresnahan, Rev. Nicanor Austriaco A Catholic Ethical Analysis of Human Plastination
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Plastination is a relatively novel technique wherein human tissue is dehydrated and the water is replaced with a plastic-like substance. The process is valuable to educational institutions, because it preserves the body for a long period of time, allowing for prolonged anatomical study. However, a number of ethical issues have been raised regarding the process, particularly related to the procurement of human specimens and the act of displaying these bodies, even for educational purposes. This article explores both the process itself and the associated ethical pitfalls, particularly from a Catholic perspective.
36. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 4
Michele Chetham Ethical Medical Decision-Making for a Child
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Ethical medical decision-making for a child is generally navigated with various standards and models that have been developed to address its complexities. A case is presented of the parents’ refusal of a surgical procedure for their child considered by medical providers as essential and potentially lifesaving, along with the ethical debate of whether the parents’ decision was in the child’s best interest and whether their refusal reached a threshold to report and seek state intervention. Utilizing the best interest standard and additional ethical decision-making tools, the ethicists helped the medical team accept the parents’ decision as reasonable, thus avoiding involvement with Child Protective Services. It is my goal to clarify the parents’ decision as reasonable and as honoring their child’s best interests and inherent dignity through the lens of Catholic anthropological and moral principles. These strengthen the ethical and moral arguments for the parents’ decision and the opposition to state intervention.
articles
37. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 4
Joseph Arias Evangelium Vitae and the Definition of Abortion
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The moral permissibility of certain acts traditionally considered abortion has become a subject of much debate in recent years. One of the main points in this debate is the question of whether there exists a difference between “abortion as removal” and “abortion as killing.” This essay strives to present readers with an orthodox interpretation of Church documents regarding abortion, giving clear and well-supported evidence that this distinction is not found in Catholic teaching
38. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 4
John Skalko The Perverted Faculty Argument Is Still Sound: A Reply to Melissa Moschella
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In a 2019 article and a 2022 article published in this journal, Melissa Moschella argues that new natural law (NNL) sexual ethics is sound and that old natural law sexual ethics fails. In her view, all non-reproductive type sexual acts are morally wrong because they are both contrary to the basic good of marriage and involve degrading the body as a mere instrument for pleasure. She also critiques the perverted faculty argument (PFA) as found within the work of Edward Feser as unsound. Here I argue that a proper understanding of the PFA as found within the writings of Thomas Aquinas easily avoids her objections and that the argument of Thomas has a distinct advantage over the pleasure argument insofar as it can ground the badness of such actions universally
39. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 4
Alan Vincelette On the Liceity of Previable Induction of Labor
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An ongoing debate in Catholic bioethical circles today centers around the liceity of inducing labor in a woman with a healthy previable fetus in order to save her life. Many Catholic bioethicists have defended the view that such inductions are morally licit even though the fetus itself has no medical issues and it is the combination of the pregnancy along with a weakened heart of the mother that is causing problems. Typically the basis for this view is the procedure’s satisfaction of the four criteria of the principle of double effect, namely: the act itself is not evil, the evil effect is not intended, the evil effect is not produced by means of the good effect, and there is proportionate reason for the procedure. A few Catholic bioethicists have worried that the procedure does not satisfy the fourth criterion, the principle of proportionate reason. Here I present arguments showing that it is also unlikely to satisfy the first criterion, that the act itself is not evil. This hinges on the principle that it is only permissible to perform acts from which evil effects follow necessarily when such acts only directly target a pathology. Fortunately such vital conflict cases are rare and hopefully medical advances will eliminate them.
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40. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 4
Preface
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