Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 21-40 of 77 documents


biosemiotics
21. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 4
Davide Weible Eksaptatsiooni semiootikast: bioloogilise evolutsiooni ja tehnoloogilise arengu lõikumispunktis
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
22. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 4
Ariel Gomez Ponce Lotman’s tradition: Semiotics of culture from a Latin American perspective
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
semiotics of montage
23. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Tomi Huttunen Preface. Montage principle and the semiotics of culture
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
24. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Михаил Ямпольский Точка – пафос – тотальность
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Mikhail Yampolsky. Point – pathos – totality. Two situations are possible when two fragments are confronted in montage. First, we can have a continuitycorresponding to some established narrative codes. For instance, a character crosses the right border of the frame and reappears from behind the left side of the next frame. Such a figure will be read as a representation of continuity, but shown not in its integrity. The gap in spatial continuity is compensated here by the continuity of a story. On the other hand, we can have a junction that has no support by any code and that opens up opportunities for the display of metaphors, metonyms and allegories. There are also possibilities for violent conflicts and shocks as in Godard. We do not really know how all these non-codified figures of montage work. There is no generally accepted theoretical model that could explain how we are able to synthesize two heterogeneous pieces.All his life Sergei Eisenstein was fascinated by montage and tried to understand its way of functioning. He was particularly interested in solving the mystery ofinteraction between elements belonging to two different media such as sound and image and in their way of creating unity. This article focuses on Eisenstein’s late writings in which he used the idea of pathos and Hegelian dialectics for the analysis of montage as a dynamic process. According to Eisenstein, montage fuses different pieces of footage but also triggers the whole mechanism of the evolution of culture. Cinema, from this point of view, is not simply an art of modernity but a highest stage in the development of culture somewhat similar to the stage of the absolute knowledge that the spirit reaches in Hegel.
25. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Михаил Ямпольский Punkt – paatos – totaalsus
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
26. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Михаил Лотман Метрический монтаж: к теории полиметрических композиций
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Mihhail Lotman. Metrical montage: On the theory of polymetrical compositions. The theory of polymetrical compositions was founded as late as in the 1970s by Pyotr Rudnev, a scholar of the University of Tartu. While Rudnev approached the problem from the paradigmatic aspect, in the present paper the priority of syntagmatics over paradigmatics is emphasized: the effect of polymetricity is based on the contrast of segments, which is, in its own way, a montage with means of verse technique. Just like in the case of video montage, here as well we can distinguish between straight cut (closed polymetrics in Rudnev’s terms) anddissolve (open polymetrics in Rudnev’s terms). The given types of montage use different semiotic mechanisms and have different semantic effects. The theoretical standpoints are illustrated with examples from Alexander Pushkin’s poetry.
27. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Михаил Лотман Meetriline montaaž: polumeetriliste kompositsioonide teooriast
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
28. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Oksana Bulgakowa From stage to brain: Montage as a new principle of scientific narrative
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
German Dadaists, Italian and Russian Futurists and Constructivists created in their experiments multi-medial orthopedic bodies as products of collage and montage. Sergei Eisenstein, who was influenced by these experiments, organized his theatrical productions as a chain of independent fragments capable ofentering any possible combination/recombination and labelled this method “montage of attractions”. He used the same montage principle not only for a new theatrical or cinematic narrative but also to conceptualize the expressive movement of the theatrical or cinematic body created on stage and on screen. Finally he conceptualized montage not only as a means of conveying movement, but also of conveying a way of thinking. This inspired him to create a new form of scientific narrative in his two unfinished books. The subject to be analysed in the first book from 1929 – montage – inspired him to look for a new structure by organizing different texts in the form of a sphere. This form defined the method of writing his second project on the theory of the arts as a hypertext. Eisenstein gave this book the title Method (1932–1948).
29. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Oksana Bulgakowa Lavalt ajusse: montaaž kui uus teadusliku narratiivi põhimõte
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
30. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Oksana Bulgakowa Со сцены в мозг: монтаж как новый принцип научного нарратива
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
31. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Tomi Huttunen Montage in Russian Imaginism: Poetry, theatre and theory
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The article discusses the concept of montage as used by the Russian Imaginist poetic group: the montage principle in their poetry, theoretical writings and theatre articles. The leading Imaginist figures Vadim Shershenevich and Anatolij Mariengof were active both in theorizing and practising montage in their oeuvre at the beginning of the 1920s. Shershenevich’s application of the principle in poetry was called “image catalogue”, a radical poetic experiment in the spirit ofboth Walt Whitman and Sergei Eisenstein. Mariengof ’s main contribution to the montage poetics was his first fictional novel The Cynics (1928). The article alsodiscusses the Imaginists’ writings on the essence of theatre as an autonomous art form – Shershenevich’s actitivy in the OGT (Experimental Heroic Theatre) andMariengof ’s participation in the work of the MKT (Moscow Kamerny Theatre).
32. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Tomi Huttunen Монтаж в русском имажинизме: поэзия, театр и теория
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
33. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Tomi Huttunen Montaaž vene imažinismis: luule, teater ja teooria
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
34. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Irene Portis-Winner Jean Rouch: The semiotics of ethnographic film
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Jean Rouch (1917–2004) is considered to be the greatest ethnographic filmmaker in the world. His films, which focus primarily on the Songhay of the Upper Niger in Africa, have fundamentally changed the spirit, goals, and methods of ethnographic filmmaking. I ask how Rouch established contact with those he filmed, how his invented semio-ethnic terms and his understanding of twoness and the other informed his practice, and in what sense his films were “shared anthropology” (his term).
35. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Irene Portis-Winner Jean Rouch: etnograafilise filmi semiootika
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
36. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Irene Portis-Winner Жан Руш: семиотика этнографического фильма
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
37. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Peeter Torop The ideological aspect of intersemiotic translation and montage
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The Estonian film The Last Relic offers an interesting case of ideological intersemiotic translation. At the same time, it is an innovative film from the point of view of text composition as well as combination of traditional montage with intersemiotic montage in which the speech of the heroes, the messages of the songs and repetition of visual and musical motifs are juxtaposed to create historical and ideological ambiguity. The specificity of this film is very close to later tendencies in using montage: the movement from a temporal understanding of montage to spatial montage in contemporary new media and 3D-movies. A new understandingof montage is also fruitful for the new interpretation of the chronotopical structure of narrative texts. The traditional theory of montage is rooted in classical literature, while new media experience opens up new possibilities for understanding mechanisms of montage. On a very general level, contemporary tendencies of montage can be analysed as chronotopical montage.
38. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Peeter Torop Идеологический аспект интерсемиотического перевода и монтажа
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
39. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Peeter Torop Intersemiootilise tõlke ja montaaži ideoloogiline aspekt
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
40. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 41 > Issue: 2/3
Илья Кукулин Приватизация бунта: “вторая жизнь” раннесоветского монтажа
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Ilya Kukulin. Privatization of a riot: “Second life” of the early Soviet montage. This paper deals with montage in the broad sense of the term: it is discussed not as a principle of film editing, but as an aesthetic method based on the contrasting combination of elements; in the case of literary narrative, montage can be defined as a contrasting parataxis. Being understood in that sense, montage became an international “grand style” of the post-WWI epoch. In the Soviet Union this new method had many ideological connotations. It represented history (the historical process as such) as creative and cruel violence. Otherwise, art montage wasa method of designing the utopian vision. The following development of montage in Russian culture could be defined as a change of its semantic. It was expelledfrom the Socialist Realism mainstream (excluding poster graphics), but survived in unofficial art of the 1940s and became postutopian. During the “Thaw” period(the late 1950s to the early 1960s) montage methods could indicate the connection of an author with the Soviet or Western European avant-garde of the 1920s. The reconsideration of those methods followed two different ways: imitation of the “resurrection of revolutionary impulses” or deconstruction of Soviet historical and social imagination – also with the tools of montage. This very intensive dialogue with the aesthetic tradition of the 1920s came to an end at the beginning of the 1970s. The authors of uncensored art and literature in that period polemicized not with the 1920s, but with the 1960s. The “living” translation of the early Soviet montage aesthetics has been settled.