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Displaying: 21-40 of 57 documents


semiotics of theatre
21. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 2
Anneli Saro Von Krahl Theatre revisiting Estonian cultural heritage
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In the 1990s Estonia underwent a process of radical socio-political changes: a periphery of the Soviet conglomerate became a country with an independent political and economic life. The new situation also brought about a revision of cultural identity, which in the Soviet Union had been grounded primarily on the dichotomy between national and Soviet culture. Since these oppositions were rendered unimportant with the changed politico-economic conditions, a time of ideological vacuum followed. Estonia as an independent state and a cultural island between the East and the West turned its face toward Europe, questioning for its new or true identity in the postmodernising and globalizing society. In this article three productions of Estonian theatre as examples of identity construction will be analysed, investigating the rewriting of cultural heritage, intercultural relationships and implicit ideologies.
22. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 2
Anneli Saro Театр фон Краля переигрывает эстонское культурное наследие. Резюмe
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23. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 2
Anneli Saro Von Krahli teater eesti kultuuripärandit ümber mängimas. Kokkuvõte
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24. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 2
Ester Võsu, Alo Joosepson Staging national identities in contemporary Estonian theatre and film
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This paper focuses on the ways in which national identities are staged in recent film and theatre productions in Estonia. We want to complement the prevalent approaches to nationality (Anderson 1983; Gellner 1983; Bhabha 1990), where the role of theatre and film as modellers of national identity are undervalued. National identity is a complex term that presupposes some clarification, which we gave by describing its dynamics today; its relation to ethnic identity, a thread between the lived and declared national identities, and the relevance of culture-based national identity. Herein we consider the concept of staging to have two implications: (1) as an aesthetic term it incorporates an artistic process, comprising several devices and levels; (2) as a concept in cultural theory it describes cultural processes in which something is set on stage for public reflection. Accordingly, in our analysis we considered national identities in theatre and film stagings in both senses. The results of our analyses demonstrated that our hypothesis about emerging new national identities in Estonia was valid, though deconstructed and hybrid national identities are not exactly and absolutely new types of identities but rather strategies of creating space for new identities to develop. A deconstructed national identity refers to the state of high self-reflexivity in which the existing elements of national identity are re-examined, recontextualised and re-evaluated. Further, a hybrid national identity demonstrates the diversity and coexistence of the components of national identity. Both strategies of staging are characteristic of the transformation of national identities, confirming that a single homogenous staging of national identity seems to be replaced by bringing multiple new self-models on stage.
25. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 2
Ester Võsu, Alo Joosepson Репрезентация темы национальной самоидентификации в современном эстонском кино и театре. Резюмe
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26. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 2
Ester Võsu, Alo Joosepson Rahvuslike identiteetide lavastamine kaasaegses eesti teatris ja filmis. Kokkuvõte
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reviews and notes
27. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 2
Bruno Osimo A translation with (apparently) no originals
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28. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 2
John Deely Floyd Merrell named sixth Thomas A. Sebeok Fellow of the Semiotic Society of America
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29. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 2
Donald Favareau Founding a world biosemiotics institution: The International Society for Biosemiotic Studies
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30. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 2
Kalevi Kull, Jesper Hoffmeyer Thure von Uexküll 1908–2004
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31. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Richard L. Lanigan The semiotic phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Michel Foucault
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Postmodern methodology in the human sciences and philosophy reverses the Aristotelian laws of thought such that (1) non-contradiction, (2) excluded middle, (3) contradiction, and (4) identity become the ground for analysis. The illustration of the postmodern logic is Peirce’s (1) interpretant, (2) symbol, (3) index, and (4) icon. The thesis is illustrated using the work of Merleau-Ponty and Foucault and the le même et l’autre discourse sign where the ratio [Self:Same :: Other:Different] explicates the communicology of Roman Jakobson in the conjunctions and disjunctions, appositions and oppositions of discours, parole, langue, and langage.
32. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Richard L. Lanigan Семиотическая феноменология Мориса Мерло-Понти и Мишеля Фуко. Резюме
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33. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Richard L. Lanigan Maurice Merleau-Ponty ja Michel Foucault’ semiootiline fenomenoloogia. Kokkuvõte
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34. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Jorge Conesa Sevilla The realm of continued emergence: The semiotics of George Herbert Mead and its implications to biosemiotics, semiotic matrix theory, and ecological ethics
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This examination of the often-inaccessible work and semiotics of George Herbert Mead focuses first on his pivotal ideas of Sociality, Consciousness, and Communication. Mead’s insight of sociality as forced relatedness, or forced semiosis, appearing early in evolution, or appearing in simple systems, guarantees him a foundational place among biosemioticians. These ideas are Mead’s exemplar description of multiple referentiality afforded to social organisms (connected to his idea of the generalized other), thus enabling passing from one umwelt to another, with relative ease. Although Mead’s comprehensive semiosis is basically sound, and in concordance with modern and contemporary semiotics (and biosemiotics), it nevertheless lacks a satisfactory explanation of how conscious organisms achieve passing into new frames of reference. Semiotic Matrix Theory (SMT), its pansemiosis, describes falsifiable existential and cognitive heuristics of recognizing Energy requirements, Safety concerns and Possibility or Opportunity as “passing” functions. Finally, another type of emergence, ecoethics, isan embedded constant in biosemiosis. Not all semiosis is good semiosis, not all text is good text. Because our species is moving away from ancient biosemiosisand interrelatedness, this historicity, even ductile enough to invent synthetic semiosis or capricious umwelten, is facing the ecological reality and consequences of an overly anthropocentric text.
35. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Jorge Conesa Sevilla Область продолжающего творчества: семиотика Джорджа Герберта Мида и ее результаты в биосемиотике, теории семиотической матрицы и экологической этике. Резюме
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36. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Jorge Conesa Sevilla Jätkuva loomingu valdkond: George Herbert Mead’i semiootika ja selle tulemid biosemiootikas, semiootilise maatriksi teoorias ja ökoloogilises eetikas. Kokkuvõte
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37. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Marcel Danesi The Fibonacci sequence and the nature of mathematical discovery: A semiotic perspective
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This study looks at the relation between mathematical discovery and semiosis, focusing on the famous Fibonacci sequence. The serendipitous discovery of this sequence as the answer to a puzzle designed by Italian mathematician Leonardo Fibonacci to illustrate the efficiency of the decimal number system is one of those episodes in human history which show how serendipity, semiosis, and discovery are intertwined. As such, the sequence has significant implications for the study of creative semiosis, since it suggests that symbols are hardly arbitrary products of human reason, but rather unconscious probes of reality.
38. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Marcel Danesi Fibonacci rida ja matemaatilise avastuse loomus: Semiootiline vaade. Kokkuvõte
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39. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Marcel Danesi Последовательность чисел Фибоначчи и сущность математи-ческого открытия. Резюме
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40. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Stephen Jarosek The semiotics of sexuality: The choice becomes the association of habits becomes the desire becomes the need
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Pragmatism is the idea that we attribute meaning to things that matter to us. Ultimately, the things that matter are intercepted by our bodies — our eyes, ears, nose, hands, feet, skin — right down to our sex differences. Our bodies are the tools with which we interface with the world — the cultural world. Sex differences provide major insights into how the body impacts on experience and thus, personality and ultimately culture’s gender roles. In my earlier paper, I discuss what Peirce identified as fundamental aspects of cognition — habits and associative learning — and I place them in the context of Heidegger’s Dasein. In this current paper, I develop on these ideas in order to apply them to understand gender roles. From the inextricable connection between habits, associative learning andDasein, we can infer the following: (1) Gender roles are habits; (2) Gender roles are chosen; (3) Men and women “like” the roles to which they have beenassigned (this is a fundamental expression of Dasein). That is to say — the choice becomes the association of habits becomes the desire becomes the need. Hence arise the needs by which gender roles are identified.