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Displaying: 31-40 of 519 documents


31. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 20
Contributors to This Issue
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32. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 19
Editor’s Notes
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33. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 19
Dedication: To John Purcell
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34. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 19
John M. Purcell Emotion and Flags: A Personal Perspective
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This compelling essay describes the author’s own relationship with flags over a lifetime of engagement and study. This volume of the journal is dedicated to his memory.
35. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 19
Scot M. Guenter The Cinco de Mayo Flag Flap: Rights, Power, and Identity
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When five white high school students in Morgan Hill, California, flouted a school policy against wearing flag-themed clothing, which had been aimed at reducing tensions on the day celebrating Mexican pride, the media firestorm decrying their treatment roiled the political airwaves.
36. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 19
John M. Hartvigsen Utah’s Mammoth Statehood Flag
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As Utah prepared to celebrate its long-awaited entry into the Union in 1896, locals sewed and displayed from the ceiling of the Mormon Tabernacle the largest flag ever made, a record which stood for 27 years and continued a tradition of large flags in Utah. This paper won the Driver Award in 2010.
37. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 19
Steven A. Knowlton Applying Sebeok’s Typology of Signs to the Study of Flags
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Thomas A. Sebeok (1920-2001), a leading semiotician, developed a useful typology which the author uses to analyze national and subnational flags, exploring them as signals, icons, indexes, and symbols and using extensively illustrations.
38. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 19
Anne M. Platoff The “Forward Russia” Flag: Examining the Changing Use of the Bear as a Symbol of Russia
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A newly-developed flag displayed by avid Russian sports fans in support of their national teams marks a change in the use of the bear symbol—first only used by outsiders to represent Russia but now claimed by Russians as their own.
39. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 19
Contributors to This Issue
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40. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 18
Editor’s Notes
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