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Displaying: 21-40 of 240 documents


21. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Contributors
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22. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Greg Moses Editor's Introduction
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features
23. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Corey L. Barnes Imperatives of Peace: A Lockean Justification for Cosmopolitan Principles
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Cosmopolitanism seems to appeal to liberal neutrality because both are committed to core values such as reciprocity, autonomy, respect for the individual, personal accountability, and inclusivity. Further, cosmopolitanism is legitimate for many only insofar as it endorses value-pluralism in open societies, which is a staple of liberal neutrality. And yet, one might think that there is a moral obligation to create a cosmopolitan community. One can think of this as moral (normative) cosmopolitanism. To the end of creating a cosmopolitan community, certain values ought to be fostered in laws and public policies, and certain attitudes ought to be cultivated. This leads to a potential impasse, namely if cosmopolitanism is committed to neutrality then it cannot promote its normativity, and if it is not committed to neutrality then it cannot promote value-pluralism. I propose a solution to this potential impasse by examining several of the democratic and cosmopolitan commitments of Alain Locke. What I take from Locke is his grounding of both pluralism and moral cosmopolitanism in democratic, time-honored principles that exist in all acts of free association, namely: liberty, equality, and fraternity. These values, of necessity, pervade all political conceptions of good lives because all political conceptions require what acts of free association allow, namely community with others. To this end, I provide an argument for how someone can consistently be committed to both moral cosmopolitanism and liberal neutrality.
24. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Sanjay Lal Affirming a Vital Connection: Nonviolence and the Disavowal of Death as a Harm
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Having freedom from the fear of death is a quality needed not just by peace activists; however, it is in particular need of affirmation by those espousing a philosophy of nonviolence. A rich philosophical literature explores the supposed harmfulness of death, but the topic is scarcely discussed by peace theorists. This paper shows the significance of the topic for highlighting the attractiveness of nonviolent philosophy given certain non-religious understandings of death that are well suited for advancing nonviolence. Classic Stoic and Epicurean disavowals of the harmfulness of death are presented, criticisms of the Epicurean position are outlined, and the example of Mahatma Gandhi is provided as an ally to Epicureans in response to the criticisms discussed. The second part of the paper more concretely illuminates the implications that a Gandhian rejection of the harmfulness of death has for living nonviolently in everyday life.
25. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
John Nolt Anger, Despondence, and Nonviolence: Reflections on the D.C. Climate March
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Reflections on anger, despondence, and nonviolence are prompted by student responses to the 2016 election, especially given the likely implications for climate change policy. The author reflects on the value of nonviolence, environmental activism, and participation in a national climate march.
26. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Anthony Sean Neal, Dwayne A. Tunstall, Felipe Hinojosa (R)evolutions of Consciousness in Thurman and Newton: Anthony Neal, Author of Common Ground, Meets Critics Dwayne A. Tunstall and Felipe Hinojosa
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book reviews
27. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Sanjay Lal The Relevance of Northern Ireland: Review of Andrew Fitz-Gibbon, Talking to Terrorists, Nonviolence, and Counter-Terrorism
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28. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Bat-Ami Bar On A Realist Approach to Immigration: Review of David Miller, Strangers in Our Midst
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29. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Rick Werner Burdens of Warism: Review of Robert L. Holmes, Pacifism
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30. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Court D. Lewis Cosmopolitan vs. Westphalian “Borders”: Review of Eddy M. Souffrant, ed. A Future without Borders? Theories and Practices of Cosmopolitan Peacebuilding
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31. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Contributors
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transitions
32. The Acorn: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
Greg Moses The Acorn in Transition
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33. The Acorn: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
Barry L. Gan, Sanjay Lal, Greg Moses The Acorn Visions: Three Editors Contribute Reflections on What the Journal Means
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34. The Acorn: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
Marilyn Fischer Essential Bibliography of Jane Addams’s Writings on Peace
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35. The Acorn: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
José-Antonio Orosco Essential Bibliography of Cesar Chavez
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features
36. The Acorn: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
José-Antonio Orosco Abolition as a Morally Responsible Response to Riots: Lessons on Violence from Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Cesar Chavez
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In this paper, I sketch out, following the suggestions of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Cesar Chavez, a morally responsible response to urban riots. This approach recommends that we focus our attention on two structural features of society that underlie and prompt urban riots. First, I examine how King recommends that we must understand the economic conditions surrounding such violence. Next, following the suggestion of Cesar Chavez, I argue we must attend to cultural violence, especially those social narratives surrounding the construction of masculinity and security in our culture. Chavez’s analysis builds on Gandhi’s notion of “constructive” nonviolent action. Chavez suggests intervening in culture to provide alternative accounts of safety and success in our society, as well as constructing new institutions and practices that embody those understandings. I conclude by examining two contemporary social movements--prison and police abolition--which attempt to embody this morally responsible response to urban violence.
37. The Acorn: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
Gail Presbey Moving North, Thinking South: Report on the 2016 World Social Forum
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38. The Acorn: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
Barry L. Gan Seeds of Duty: Holding to Nonviolence in Being and Truth
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39. The Acorn: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
Predrag Cicovacki, Carlo Filice, Sanjay Lal Author Meets Critics: Predrag Cicovacki, Author of Gandhi’s Footprints, Meets Critics Sanjay Lal and Carlo Filice
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Two critics respond to Predrag Cicovacki’s book, Gandi’s Footprints. Cicovacki opens the discussion by presenting his motivations for exploring a paradox, that Gandhi’s work is widely revered but not widely emulated. Cicovacki explores a resolution to the paradox by suggesting how Gandhi’s promising visions may be followed without being imitated, especially Gandhi’s insight that we must seek spiritual grounding for life in a materialistic world. Critic Sanjay Lal affirms Cicovacki’s insight but suggests that precisely because Gandhi’s aspirations for spiritual life were profoundly transformative we should take care not to dilute them into our conventional wisdoms. Critic Carlo Filice asks how Gandhi’s commitment to unified reality could be more clearly articulated once a distinction is drawn between spirit and matter, also how Gandhi’s nonviolence could manage to embrace important exceptions. In reply to critics, Cicovacki proposes an approach to Gandhi informed by the insights of Tagore.
book reviews
40. The Acorn: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1/2
Tom H. Hastings Three Hundred Years toward Peace: Review of "War No More: Three Centuries of American Antiwar and Peace Writing" edited by Lawrence Rosenwald
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