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book review
41. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 95 > Issue: 2
Mark K. Spencer Aesthetics
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articles
42. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 95 > Issue: 1
Christof Betschart The Constitution of the Human Person as Discovery and Awakening
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Scholars strive, in their treatment of Stein’s work, to express both a phenomenological concept of the human person, characterized by conscious and free spiritual activity, and a metaphysical concept of the person, seen as an individual essence unfolding throughout life. In Stein’s work, the two concepts are not simply juxtaposed, nor is there a shift from one to the other. Stein integrates her phenomenological research into a metaphysical framework. In the present contribution, I endeavor to show that Stein’s interpretation of Husserl’s concept of constitution focuses on the question of whether this constitution is to be understood realistically or idealistically and on the question of the constituting subject. I shall argue that Stein’s interpretation of constitution is closely linked to the lived experience she calls already in her early writings “self-discovery” and “awakening.”
43. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 95 > Issue: 1
Gregory R. P. Stacey Perfect Being Theology and Analogy
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Thomas Williams has argued that the doctrine of univocity (the thesis that God and creatures can be predicated of univocally) is true and salutary. Such a claim is frequently contested, particularly in regard to the property—if there be any such—of existence or being. Inspired by the thought of Francisco Suárez, I outline a way of understanding the thesis of the analogy of being that avoids the criticisms levelled by Williams and others against analogy. I further suggest that the metaphysically committed version of univocal predication favoured by many analytic philosophers of religion causes difficulties for the practice of perfect being theology, which is often taken to play an important role in the construction of kataphatic philosophical theologies. My exposition of the analogy of being is, I suggest, better fitted to the practice of perfect being theology and, thus, salutary for the practice of Christian natural theology.
44. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 95 > Issue: 1
Yul Kim Why Does the Wood Not Ignite Itself? Duns Scotus’s Defense of the Will’s Self-Motion
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The goal of this paper is to analyze the response of John Duns Scotus to Godfrey of Fontaines’s argument against Henry of Ghent’s theory of the will’s self-motion. Godfrey’s argument is that, if the object is assumed to be causa sine qua non and the efficient causality is totally attributed to the will in the act of volition, it would also follow that not only the will’s motion but every motion in nature, such as, for example, the igniting of wood, is a self-motion. In this paper, I will explain that Scotus’s refutation of this argument in Reportatio II, d. 25 is based on his reflection upon the general possibility of self-motion as well as upon the indeterminacy of the will’s act. In doing so, I will show that the development of Scotus’s theory of the will’s motion is closely related to his universalized theory of self-motion.
45. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 95 > Issue: 1
Patrick H. Byrne Curiosity: Vice or Virtue? Augustine and Lonergan
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Two recent studies by Joseph Torchia and Paul Griffiths show the importance of Augustine’s critique of the vice of curiositas to contemporary life and thought. Superficially, it might seem that Augustine condemned curiosity because it “seeks to find out whatever it wishes without restriction of any kind.” Though profoundly influenced by Augustine, Bernard Lonergan praised intellectual curiosity precisely insofar as it is motivated by an unrestricted desire to know, rather than by less noble motives. Drawing upon the researches of Torchia and Griffiths, this article endeavors to show that Augustine does not simply equate curiositas with an unrestricted desire to know, and that the virtue of intellectual curiosity as Lonergan understood it is in fact endorsed by Augustine by means of its relationship to the virtue of studiositas. This more nuanced view of the virtues and vices of intellect can provide guidance for contemporary intellectual pursuits, both how to pursue and not to pursue knowledge.
46. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 95 > Issue: 1
Paul A. Macdonald Jr. Acknowledging Animal Rights: A Thomistic Perspective
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In this article, I show how it is possible, working from a Thomistic perspective, to affirm the existence of animal rights. To start, I show how it is possible to ascribe indirect rights to animals—in particular, the indirect right to not be treated cruelly by us. Then, I show how it is possible to ascribe some direct rights to animals using the same reasoning that Aquinas offers in defending the claim that animals have indirect rights. Next, I draw on elements of Aquinas’s metaphysical worldview in order to buttress the claim that animals have direct rights. I then respond to an attempt to ground the ethical treatment of animals, but not direct rights for animals, in natural law. In conclusion, I affirm that it is permissible to use animals to further the human good so long as in doing so we respect the direct rights that they possess.
disputed questions
47. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 95 > Issue: 1
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco, OP Thomistic Thoughts About Thought and Talk
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48. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 95 > Issue: 1
Marie George Does Knowing What Things Are Require Language (As a System of Physical or Imaginable Signs)?
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49. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 95 > Issue: 1
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco, OP On the Limits of Abstraction: A Response to Professor Marie Georg
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50. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 95 > Issue: 1
Marie George A Rambutan by Any Other Name Would Taste as Sweet: Response to Professor Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco, OP
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book reviews
51. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 95 > Issue: 1
James M. Jacobs From Human Dignity to Natural Law: An Introduction. By Richard Berquist. Foreword by Steven J. Jensen
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52. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 95 > Issue: 1
Philip Rolnick John Henry Newman on Truth and its Counterfeits: A Guide For Our Times. By Reinhard Hütter
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53. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 95 > Issue: 1
Daniel Shields Intention, Character, and Double Effect. By Lawrence Masek
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articles
54. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 94 > Issue: 4
Gaston G. LeNotre Determinate and Indeterminate Dimensions: Does Thomas Aquinas Change His Mind on Individuation?
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The scholarly consensus is that Thomas Aquinas’s views about individuation changed over time. The consensus states that he wavered in his opinion about whether determinate dimensions or indeterminate dimensions serve in the individuation of corporeal substances. I argue that this consensus is mistaken. I focus on early texts of Thomas to argue that he relies on different types of dimensions to answer different problems of individuation. Determinate dimensions resolve a problem in the order of perfection, and indeterminate dimensions resolve a problem in the order of generation. I explain texts that answer the problem of individuation in the order of perfection according to questions about universals, cognition, and science. I then explain texts that answer the problem of individuation in the order of generation. My conclusion argues that, despite abandoning the language, Thomas continues later in his career to rely on indeterminate dimensions to resolve the problem of individuation in the order of generation.
55. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 94 > Issue: 4
Bryan Frances The Epistemology of Theistic Philosophers’ Reactions to the Problem of Evil
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I first argue that, contrary to many atheistic philosophers, there is good reason to think the typical theistic philosopher’s retaining of her theism when faced with the Problem of Evil (PoE) is comparatively epistemically upstanding even if both atheism is true and the typical theistic philosopher has no serious criticism of the atheist’s premises in the PoE argument. However, I then argue that, contrary to many theistic philosophers, even if theism is true, the typical theistic philosopher has no good non-theistic reasons for rejecting any of the atheist’s premises, and she has good non-theistic reasons in favor of the atheist’s premises. In that respect, it’s extremely difficult for the theistic philosopher to respond to the PoE in an informative, non-question-begging way. I close by considering whether theistic philosophers should reject my second thesis.
56. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 94 > Issue: 4
Matthew McWhorter Aquinas and the Moral Virtues of a Christian Person
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Aquinas teaches that the acquired moral virtues associated with the civil life are to be differentiated from the gratuitous moral virtues associated with the spiritual life. An interpretation of Aquinas will benefit from situating his various remarks on the moral virtues within the context of his teaching regarding how Christian persons develop in virtue over time. In this account, Aquinas makes a distinction between the moral virtues exercised in this life (in via) and in heaven (in patria), as well as between three stages of the Christian moral life in via (active, intermediate, and contemplative). I argue that Aquinas indicates that for Christian persons the acquired moral virtues are retained in the active life in via, but not in patria. Further, claims that Aquinas makes regarding the relationship between the contemplative moral virtues and the active moral virtues provide an analogy for understanding how infused charity might relate to the acquired moral virtues.
57. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 94 > Issue: 4
Shane D. Courtland The Not-So-Prolife Leviathan
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In an article that appeared in American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, Kody Cooper argued that “to be a Hobbesian is to be prolife.” In this essay, I will provide an argument that rebuts Cooper’s prolife interpretation of Hobbes. First, I will argue that Cooper has, without argument, committed an equivocation between a person’s personal identity and his or her organism. Resolving this ambiguity would allow for an interpretation of Hobbes that can consistently reject the notion that the life of a person “begins at conception.” Second, I will show that Cooper fails to take into account the significant costs that are placed upon prospective mothers and is therefore not able to judge whether or not aborting a fetus is within a mother’s enlightened self-interest. Third, I will, contrary to Cooper, show why it may be acceptable for a Hobbesian sovereign to construct a legal regime that is permissive of abortion.
58. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 94 > Issue: 4
Brandon Dahm The Virtue of Somnience
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It’s strange that sleep doesn’t come up more when we think of virtue. In this paper, I argue that there is a virtue concerned with sleep, which I call “somnience,” and I develop an account of this virtue. My account of somnience builds on the virtue tradition of Aristotle and Aquinas and recent research about the nature of sleep. In the first section I argue that there is a need for such a virtue. Next, I argue that somnience is a form of temperance. Third, I show how somnience connects to a number of other virtues, which helps us fill out the nature of the virtue. Finally, I argue that sleep also relates to virtue by aiding virtue formation.
59. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 94 > Issue: 4
Robert McNamara Edith Stein’s Conception of Human Unity and Bodily Formation: A Thomistically Informed Understanding
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The problem of human unity lies at the heart of Edith Stein’s investigation of the structure of human nature in her mature works. By examining her resolution of this problem in Der Aufbau der menschlichen Person and Endliches und ewiges Sein, I show how Stein incorporates two teachings of Thomistic anthropology—namely, the rational soul as principle both of substantial unity and of bodily formation—while reinterpreting the meaning of these teachings through performing a fresh phenomenological investigation. Although this investigation leads Stein to propose a conceptually different explanation of human unity and bodily formation than that given by Aquinas, I argue that this difference should not be understood as if Stein and Aquinas stand squarely opposed on these important anthropological questions, but rather that Stein’s proposal lies in decisive continuity with the received teachings of Aquinas even while it represents an expanded conception of these teachings that also includes some contrast and disagreement.
book reviews
60. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 94 > Issue: 4
Andrew J. Jaeger In Defense of Extended Conciliar Christology: A Philosophical Essay. By Timothy Pawl
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