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Displaying: 41-60 of 4175 documents


dissertationes
41. Augustinianum: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Miryam De Gaetano La ricerca della Sapientia in De resurr. 278-292 (CPL 1463)
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The aim of this study is to analyse a passage of the pseudoepigraphic Carmen de resurrectione (vv. 278-292) which relates to insipientes, interpreted as those who do not accept that the rational observation of nature proves the existence of a unique creator God. Such a refusal is believed to make them worthy of eternal damnation. The resulting concept of sapientia involves both ratio and voluntas; it is also connected with gnoseology and soteriology. A similar concept can be found in the Aquitanian poetry of the fifth century and in the theology of the so-called Semipelagians. This similarity calls into question the traditional dating and the supposed area of origin of the Carmen.
42. Augustinianum: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Maria Chiara Giorda Diakonia et économes au service de l’économie monastique en Égypte (IV e-VIII e siècles)
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Despite the ideal of dispossession, absolute poverty and the total absence of links with possession and human beings which shaped the myth of the monastic desert, the monastic economy and its management were very similar to the secular economic system, in that both were organised by networks based on families.This article tackles how and where material assets were produced and administered in Egyptian monasteries between the fourth and eighth centuries (the diakonia), and who was responsible for this function (the oikonomos). The history of monasticism is materially related to the institutionalisation of the society’s cultural and material systems of production. Consequently the economy was also transformed by monastic practices: history is linked to the definition and the successful affirmation of the figure of the oikonomos, the steward in charge of everyday life in monasteries.
43. Augustinianum: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Christos Terezis, Lydia Petridou Historical and Systematic Approaches of Pseudo-Dionysious the Areopagite’s De divinis nominibus: A Case Study (George Pachymeres)
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This is a case study of Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite’s De divinis nominibus, a text about God’s names and properties in which human effort to comprehend the projections of the divine energies is described. We specifically focus our attention on the Paraphrasis of George Pachymeres, who was one of the most important representatives of the Palaeologan Renaissance and a great commentator on Pseudo-Dionysius’ works. His introduction to the De divinis nominibus provides us with the opportunity to approach it in two ways: from the historical point of view, we discuss the reason why the text was composed; from the systematic point of view, we discuss some general points about what names and definitions indicate. This is important for a better understanding of the rest of the treatise.
adnotationes
44. Augustinianum: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Andrés Sáez Gutiérrez, Juan José Ayán Calvo Acerca del término uJpovqesiç en el Adversus haereses de Ireneo de Lyon
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The focus is on the meaning of ὑπόϑεσις in Irenaeus of Lyons’ Adversus haereses. Our case is to argue that two different elements converge in ὑπόϑεσις or its translations (especially argumentum) in the Latin version of AH. The first stems from the Greek literary field, in which ὑπόϑεσις means the “subject” or “plot” of a dramatic or poetic composition. The second is related to the philosophical meaning of ὑπόϑεσις as “that which is placed under” or “foundation”. On the one hand, Irenaeus uses ὑπόϑεσις theologically to express the plot of the historia salutis, so that the term can be understood as teaching or doctrine. On the other hand, this ὑπόϑεσις is at the same time a regula, the normative foundation of all the elements that take part in God’s economy of salvation.
recensiones
45. Augustinianum: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Bengt Alexanderson Conciliorum Oecumenicorum Generaliumque Decreta. IV/1 The Great Councils of the Orthodox Churches: Decisions andSynodika. From Constantinople 861 to Constantinople 1872. IV/2 The Great Councils of the Orthodox Churches: Decisions andSynodika. From Moscow 1551 to Moscow 2000. IV/3 The Great Councils of the Orthodox Churches: Decisions and Synodika. Crete 2016
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46. Augustinianum: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Donato Bono The Apostles in Early Christian Art and Poetry, ed. Roald Dijkstra
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47. Augustinianum: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Jerónimo Leal Mª Amparo Mateo Donet, La ejecución de los mártires cristianos en el imperio romano
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48. Augustinianum: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Donato Bono Preaching after Easter. Mid-Pentecost, Ascension, and Pentecost in Late Atiquity, edited by Richard W. Bishop, Johan Leemans, and Hajnalka Tamas, with the assistence of Liesbeth Van der Sypt
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49. Augustinianum: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Kolawole Chabi Joseph J. McInerney, The Greatness of Humility. Saint Augustine on Moral Excellence
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50. Augustinianum: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Jerónimo Leal Christophe Rico, Le traducteur de Bethléem: Le génie interprétatif de saint Jérôme à l’aune de la linguistique
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51. Augustinianum: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
José Luis Narvaja Agobard de Lyon, Œuvres Tome I, texte critique du CCCM 52 (ed. L. Van Acker), avant-propos Nicole Bériou, sous la direction de Michel Rubellin
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52. Augustinianum: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Giuseppe Caruso La Strega (Strix) di Gianfrancesco Pico. Introduzione, testo, traduzione e commento di Lucia Pappalardo
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53. Augustinianum: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Bengt Alexanderson Clare K. Rothschild, New Essays on the Apostolic Fathers
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54. Augustinianum: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Antonino Isola Tertulliano, Le uniche nozze, edizione critica con introduzione, traduzione note e indici riveduta e corretta a cura di Renato Uglione
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dissertationes
55. Augustinianum: Volume > 57 > Issue: 2
In memoriam del Prof. Manlio Simonetti
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56. Augustinianum: Volume > 57 > Issue: 2
Roberta Franchi Il martirio e gli animali: Blandina, Perpetua e Tecla
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Replete with stories of gods and men interacting with animals, classical literature also affords a broad range of relationships between women and animals. Such a rich series of symbolic animals finds fertile ground in the biblical world, too. Apart from symbolic animals, early Christianity knows a direct contact with wild animals during the persecutions carried out by the Roman Empire. By analyzing the martyrdom of some women (Blandina, Perpetua and Thecla) in connection with the animals they had to face, we can note that animals acquire a symbolic meaning. They become the pieces of an allegorical and exegetical framework whose major purpose is to celebrate God.
57. Augustinianum: Volume > 57 > Issue: 2
Angelo Di Berardino The Historical Geography of Asia Minor at the Time of Paul and Thecla: The Roman Provinces and the means of Communication
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The Apostle Paul exercised his ministry in the Roman provinces of Galatia and Asia. An unknown presbyter of the second century wrote the Acts of Paul. An important part of this text consists of the Acts of Paul and Thecla. Although sometimes these Acts circulated as a separate text, they recount the vicissitudes of the virgin Thecla, native of the city of Iconium (the present Konya). The events take place mainly in the cities of Iconium of Licaonia and of Antioch of Pisidia (Yalvaç), two neighboring regions in the heart of Anatolia in the Roman province of southern Galatia. The article intends to offer the historical, geographical, linguistic and cultural background of the Acts of Paul and Thecla of the second half of the second century.
58. Augustinianum: Volume > 57 > Issue: 2
Geoffrey D. Dunn Ecclesiology in Early North African Christianity: The Parable of the Wheat and the Weeds
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The Matthean parable of the wheat and the weeds (Matt 13:24-30) appears across the spectrum of writings of early Christians in north Africa. Given that the parable seems to advocate a non-judgemental acceptance of sinners within the community in the present age, while north African Christianity is known for its emphasis on membership purity and the exclusion of sinners, how was this parable handled in that context? This article argues that an author like Tertullian avoided the ecclesiological dimensions of the parable, and that Cyprian never applied the parable so as to reject the excommunication of the lapsed. Tyconius and Optatus made only passing reference to the parable. Augustine found the parable helpful in arguing against the Donatist practice of excommunicating traditores. Contra litteras Petiliani is considered in some detail. Yet even Augustine, who stands outside the north African tradition, believed in the excommunication.
59. Augustinianum: Volume > 57 > Issue: 2
F. Dolbeau Deux Sermons d’Augustin pour les fêtes de Jean-Baptiste et de Pierre et Paul (s. 293 et 299)
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Published here is a critical edition of Augustine’s Sermons 293 and 299, the first edition since the Maurists. Sermon 293 was preached in Carthage on the 24th of June 413, feast of John the Baptist, at a time when infant baptism was a controversial question. Sermon 299 was delivered on the 29th of June, in honour of Peter and Paul : its manuscript transmission and thematic likeness with Sermon 293 suggest that it was preached, according to Pierre-Marie Hombert’s hypothesis, in the same year in the same city, not five years later. Both texts, numbered among the longest of the De sanctis sermons, contradict Pelagian theses about the origin of death and the notion of human impeccability.
60. Augustinianum: Volume > 57 > Issue: 2
P. J. J. van Geest ‘Sed ea quae obscura sunt praetermitto’ (Speculum 108): Augustine’s Selection of Scriptural Quotations in his Speculum as Proof of his Desire to Effect a Confrontation
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Although at first sight the Speculum contains ‘too little Augustine’ for theologians who are attempting to discover the originality of this thought, it is in fact a revealing anthology. An examination of the criteria used for the selection of Scriptural quotations brings to light an important facet of his mystagogy. Both the exclusion and inclusion criteria demonstrate that Augustine’s intention is to confront his reader with his own imperfections, and this to a much greater degree than is suggested by the understatement of Speculum 108 that the moral guidelines proffered should have an immediate impact. Augustine’s aim in writing the Speculum is to effect a confrontation of the reader with himself, in a first, but permanent step on the way of mystagogy. Scripture serves as a mirror to reflect as detailed and unpolished an image as possible of the person who looks into it; the confrontation must be as violent as possible.