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Displaying: 41-47 of 47 documents


news and notes
41. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1
NEWS AND NOTES
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discussion papers
42. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1
Frederik Kaufman Machines, Sentience, and the Scope of Morality
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Environmental philosophers are often concerned to show that non-sentient things, such as plants or ecosystems, have interests and therefore are appropriate objects of moral concern. They deny that mentality is a necessary condition for having interests. Yet they also deny that they are committed to recognizing interests in things like machines. I argue that either machines have interests (and hence moral standing) too or mentality is a necessary condition for inclusion within the purview of morality. I go on to argue that the aspect of mentality necessary for having interests is more complicated than mere sentience.
43. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1
Brian K. Steverson Ecocentrism and Ecological Modeling
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Typical of ecocentric approaches such as the land ethic and the deep ecology movement is the use of concepts from ecological science to create an “ecoholistic” ontological foundation from which a strong environmental ethic is generated. Crucial to ecocentric theories is the assumption that ecological science has shown that humanity and nonhuman nature are essentially integrated into communal or communal-like arrangements. In this essay, I challenge the adequacy of that claim. I argue that for the most part the claim is false, and that, if it were true, it would overextend the sphere of morally considerable entities to include entities that are implausibly deserving of moral consideration. In either case, the foundation of ecocentrism is significantly weakened.
44. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1
David Strong Disclosive Discourse, Ecology, and Technology
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Currently, much hope for the protection of nature is pinned on the science of ecology. Without suggesting that we should pay less serious attention to science, I argue for a more pluralistic approach to the environmental and technological problems facing our time. I maintain that when ecology changes attitudes and ways of life, it does so by importing a language of engagement with nature rather than by remaining confined to a strictly scientific account. This language of engagement, which shows how nature and natural things can be engaged by humans in a multiplicity of ways, I call disclosive discourse. Disclosive discourse, however, is not used exclusively by ecologists and other scientists. To the contrary, the great literary writers exemplify in their writings the ways this discourse can present nature and natural things in their most profound and powerful appeal. Moreover, disclosive discourse is not limited to words: artworks, too, are disclosive. By characterizing the deeper problem with which we are faced differently, as fundamentally technological rather than environmental, a more diversified plurality of alternatives to technology, not limited to those having to do with primarily nature, can be brought into relief and encouraged.
book reviews
45. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1
John B. Cobb, Jr. Six Billion & More: Human Population and Christian Ethics
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46. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1
Jesse Seaton Tatum Research in Philosophy & Technology: Technology and the Environment
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47. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1
Joseph W. Meeker The Voice of the Earth
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