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Displaying: 41-60 of 123 documents


corporate social responsibility and social performance
41. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Mari Kondo Employment and People with Disabilities: Possibilities and Limitations of CSR in Japan
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This paper investigates one aspect of corporate social responsibility, incorporating diversity, especially the employment of people with disabilities in Japan. Where literature on incorporating diversity through the inclusion of minorities in Japan is concerned, a reasonable number exists that focus on gender and women managers. In contrast, very scant literature (in English) exists on the employment of people with disabilities in Japan. This paper will try to fill the gap.
42. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Mari Kondo CSR Initiatives of Japanese Multinational Enterprises in a Developing Country: Cases from the Philippines
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Almost no literature exists, both in Japanese and English, when it comes to the CSR activities of Japanese MNEs operating outside Japan, especially in developing countries. This exploratory research will try to fill this gap of literature by examining CSR activities of Japanese MNEs in one of the developing Asian countries, the Philippines.
43. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Mari Kondo Corporate Social Responsibility for Peace Building: Exploring Cases of Mindanao
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The purpose of this paper is to introduce corporate social responsibility case, a micro-finance program, conducted at Mindanao, Philippines, by a local Filipinocompany. The paper is a description of the Islamic micro-finance program and challenges in the area affected by conflicts.
44. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Mari Kondo, Helen J. Muller Japanese Women: Towards Inclusion?
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Our paper explores several factors related to the relatively small percentage of women managers in organizations in Japan (especially in comparison to otherindustrialized nations) and examines the strategies of several major corporations that have incorporated diversity management into their corporate social responsibility programs to address problems of gender equity.
45. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Johanna Kujala, Paula Merikari, Jenni Enroth Putting Corporate Responsibility into Practice: Examining the Gap Between Strategic Plans and Operational Actions
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The purpose of this paper is to analyse the gap between the strategic and operational levels of corporate responsibility. The strategic level of corporateresponsibility refers to the strategic plans concerning corporate responsibility which are examined by looking at the corporate responsibility documents. The operational level stands for the everyday actions of retailers which are analysed through interviews of nine retailers. The gap between the strategic plans and operational actions is described and analysed to understand why and how the gap exists and what could be done to overcome the gap in the future.
46. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Matias Laine Sustainable Development? Business Rhetoric of Sustainability in Finnish Corporate Disclosures 1985-2005
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The study analyses how the corporate rhetoric of sustainability has developed in Finland during 1985-2005. The dataset consisting of the disclosures of four leading Finnish companies has been analyzed through discourse analytic methods. The findings question whether the ever-increasing popularity of sustainability-related concepts actually means that society is moving forward on the road towards sustainability.
47. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Jan Lepoutre, Mike Valente Overcoming Calimero: Complexes in Small Business Social Responsibility
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In this paper, we examine how SMEs successfully implement proactive social and environmental strategies (PSEs). Using inductive theory building on 8 case studies of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) operating in both developing and developed country contexts, we identify four dynamic capabilities that explain how SMEs overcome time, resources, knowledge, and power constraints when implementing proactive social and environmental strategies. We introduce three moderating variables to explain how level of country development, organizational lifecycle, and availability of supporting institutions could impact the level of capability importance. Furthermore, we discuss the interconnectedness of these capabilities to fully explore their dynamism in explaining how SMEs engage in sustainable business practices.
48. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Tyron Love Corporate Philanthropy: Drawing on Countervailing Notions for Social Research
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Many international academicians have detailed the determinants and motivations of corporate philanthropy offering significant insight. Yet attempts to objectify the organisation may have mistreated its complex social nature. Scholarship grounded in constructionist thought may allow us to explore and explain philanthropic behaviour and organisational complexity in ways which address contemporary research issues and stagnant conceptions.
49. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Diana Mangalagiu Corporate Social Responsibility: A Catalyst for Progressive Change in the US Energy Sector?
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Development of carbon neutral energy sources is essential if the US is to reduce the release of greenhouse gases and the associated potential for global climate change. In the US a few giant corporations dominate the energy sector. Furthermore, there has been virtually no federal leadership on energy issues, and the awareness of the issues by the general public, let alone their understanding of them, is low. In Europe, the energy sector is also dominated by a few players, but the higher awareness of the public, the long lasting efforts of NGOs and other stakeholders, in addition to the mandatory regulations (both at a national and an European level) has created a different “energy landscape”. Even in Europe, the current and pending reductions in CO2 emissions are still far short of what is required and the level of understanding of the issues by the public is still relatively low on both continents. In this paper, we identify and discuss the main politicalchallenges and drivers in the energy and climate debate, and we point out that while the energy sector has no interest to tackle greenhouse gas emissions without significantly greater public pressure, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in this sector could nonetheless play a key role in changing US energy policy, but at the same time is very unlikely to be sufficient by itself.
50. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Lalita A. Manrai, Ajay K. Manrai Business-Society Relationship: A New Framework for Societal Marketing Concept
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The Societal Marketing Concept represents a shift in the focus of business activities from fulfilling the desires of “individual” consumers in the “short-term” (marketing concept) to protecting the “collective” interests of the society in the “longterm.” In this research we develop a conceptual framework that identifies three processes through which the transition from marketing to societal marketing concept takes place. These three processes are Socially Responsible Marketing, Environmentally-Friendly Marketing, and Morally Just Marketing. Each of these three components is developed by reviewing the relevant literature in the related fields, examples are given, and marketing implications are discussed. We evaluate the acceptance of the Societal Marketing concept, identify reasons for its limited success, and discuss how the acceptance and practice of Societal Marketing Concept by businesses, consumers, and public policy makers can possibly be increased. The final section of the paper identifies Global Societal Marketing Concept as the next possible paradigm.
51. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Atle Midttun Corporate Responsibility as an Arena for Partnered Governance: From the Business to the Public Policy Case
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By highlighting the specific characteristics of corporate-responsibility(CR)-oriented public governance and juxtaposing them with more traditional regulatoryapproaches, this paper will highlight some of the issues, challenges and policy tools associated with this regulatory orientation. Through stylized examples the paper also illustrates how CR-oriented public governance, interfacing with CR-oriented business strategies may play itself out in the global economy.
52. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Benjamin A. Neville, Trevor Goddard Navigating the Social Governance Gap: An Exploration of Rio Tinto’s Administration of Citizenship Rights
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When business organisations become involved in contributing to and resolving social issues, they enter areas traditionally seen as the purview of governments. In doing so, they begin to take on the expectations and responsibilities of government; they become politicised. This politicisation is a product of business’s success and power and appears largely unavoidable. Adopting Matten & Crane’s (2005a) extended view of corporate citizenship, business organisations’ responsibilities extend to the administration of citizens’ social, civil and political rights. We term these areas where business organisations take over the administration of citizenship rights as the social governance gap. Drawing upon the agenda of Margolis and Walsh (2003), we seek to enhance the understanding of how business navigates its responsibilities within the social governance gap, including its function as a significant actor influencing societal development and wellbeing. We do this through an exploration of Rio Tinto’s involvement in the WA Future Fund. This paper forms part of an introductory scoping case study of the Rio Tinto WA Future fund and its function as one of Rio Tinto’s diverse responses to community development issues in Western Australia.
53. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Stephen Pavelin, Lynda A. Porter The Corporate Social Performance Content of Innovation in the UK
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This paper investigates the influence of innovation on the relationship between corporate strategy and social issues. Specifically, we employ firm-level data for a large sample of UK companies drawn from a diverse range of industrial sectors to investigate, given innovation, the determinants of both the probability that the innovation brings reduced environmental impacts and/or improved health and safety, and the strength of this effect. In this connection, we find evidence of a dichotomy between product and process innovations, and roles for firm size, industrial sector, a foreign market presence, access to various information sources (e.g., universities and government research organisations) and the extent to which activities are constrained by regulation. Furthermore, we find a tendency for the influences of many of these factors to vary between older and newer firms.
54. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Linda C. Rodríguez How Do Managers Choose CSR Strategy: Country Risk and CSR Strategy Choice
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This paper concerns the connection between perceived country risk and corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategies and the communication of CSR strategychoices to consumers. This study incorporates the idea of explicit (voluntary) and implicit (regulated) CSR and presents possible CSR strategies that managers might choose based on risk. Using a convenience sample, this study finds that as managers perceive greater country risk, managers choose predominately compliance based CSR strategies. The purpose of this study is to understand strategies that managers choose based on perceived country risk and to recommend future research for CSR strategy implementation.
55. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Angeloantonio Russo, Antonio Tencati Formal vs. Informal CSR Strategies: An In-Depth Analysis of Italian Micro, Small, Medium-Sized, and Large Enterprises
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Recent research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) is suggesting the need for filling the knowledge gap in the relationship between small and mediumsized enterprises (SMEs) and CSR. SMEs rarely use the language of CSR to describe what they are doing, but informal CSR strategies deeply characterize their businesses. The goal of this paper is to investigate whether a distinction exists between formal and informal CSR strategies, whereas formal CSR strategies should be a prerogative by large firms and informal CSR strategies should be a condition of micro, small, and medium-sized enterprises. A sample of 3,626 Italian firms is used to investigate the research questions. Based on a multi-stakeholder framework, the analysis provides evidence that small businesses reveal their aptitude towards CSR through strategies with an important impact on the bottom line as an attempt to strengthen their license to operate in the communities; large firms are far away from integrating their CSR strategies with explicit management systems.
56. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Davide Secchi, Antonio Majocchi Modeling Socially Responsible Behavior in Small Businesses
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This paper focuses on social responsibilities of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The objective of the paper is to define propositions in order totest if and how the behavior of small companies depends on managerial tasks, and general environmental threats and opportunities. Broadly speaking, we try toanswer to the following questions. Is there a way to connect small companies’ attitudes towards social responsibility to the models of the businesses they run?Does socially responsible behavior depend on the specific industry or the local economic environment, more than on firm size?
57. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Christian Thauer Change Caused by CSR-PPPs on Participating Companies: Hypotheses for the Large Retailer Industry Sector
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CSR-PPPs are a new and especially relevant phenomenon in today’s world politics. Little is known, however, about the effects of this “New Mode of GlobalGovernance”. The paper addresses this deficit and presents a theoretical model from which hypotheses about the effects of CSR-PPPs can be deduced. It furthermore illustrates the applicability of the model by generating hypotheses about the effectiveness of CSR initiatives in the large retailer industry sector.
58. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Daniela Toro, Joan Mundet Social and Business Strategies: Possible Synergy Between Economic Profit and Social Value
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This paper intends to make a revision of the academic literature that focuses social responsibility from a strategic view. In line with the previous ideas, the aim of this paper is to add itself to the group of researches that conceive CSR as an integral part of the business strategy. For this purpose it focuses on studying those relationships that may exist between the firm’s Business Strategy (BS) and the Social Strategy (SS). Based on the assumption that CSR can be strategic to the company and that its application will be based on a social strategy, this research project, wishes to study the way in which it is considered and understood in relation to the business strategy.
59. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Carmen Valor The Contributions of the Energy Industry to the Millennium Development Goals: Model Proposal and Evaluation of Current Implementation
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This paper develops and tests a benchmark to evaluate the effort of the energy industry towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. Thebenchmark was tested with the Spanish energy companies operating in Argentina, Colombia and Mexico. The research concludes that there is still an informal effort to fight poverty in developing countries.
60. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2007
Judith van der Voort, Lucas Meijs The Double Edge of Legitimation: The Micro Dynamics in Framing Corporate Community Involvement
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This article draws on the results of an inductive qualitative study on the microdynamics of framing corporate community involvement. Insight is provided into these dynamics by using the metaphor of a social movement and drawing on that literature’s framing perspective. Based on accounts of diverse organizational members, we identify several double edges in framing CCI as a strategic issue, and we develop a model that helps to understand why and how strategizing CCI may be controversial.