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Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society

Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Volume 14
Proceedings of the Fourteenth Annual Meeting

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Displaying: 41-57 of 57 documents


stakeholder issues and theory
41. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Lorne S. Cummings Managerial Attitudes Toward Stakeholder Salience Within Selected Western Pacific-Rim Economies
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This study empirically examines the attitudes of managers and managerial students in Australia, China and Indonesia, toward the perceived salience (legitimacy, power and urgency) of selected organisational stakeholders. A development model (based on economic and social factors) is used to argue that Australian respondents will perceive greater equality in prominence between the selected organisational stakeholders, than their Chinese and Indonesian counterparts. Results indicated that Chinese respondents attributed greater prominence toward Government as an organisational stakeholder, and contrary to expectations, perceived greater equality (less variance) in prominence between stakeholders.
42. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Johanna Kujala, Juha Näsi Minding Management: A Framework for Stakeholder Inclusion
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In this paper, we outline a framework and concept of minding management. The paper stems from an intertwined relation of business and morality, and our understanding is that the stakeholder approach is a suitable ground for combining business and ethics. The framework is based on one hand on the stakeholder approach and on the other hand on business ethics, especially postmodern ethical thinking. The concept of minding management is based on these two dimensions: taking into account the stakeholders’ views and acting as a mediator in stakeholder dialogue. The role and importance of dialogue and stakeholder inclusion in everyday managerial practices is emphasised in the developed framework.
43. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Barry M. Mitnick, John F. Mahon Aggregating Reputation: The Role and Use of Reputation-Sets
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44. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Salme Näsi, Juha Näsi Accountability as a Stakeholder Thinking Concept
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This paper considers the most important elements of both the stakeholder theory and accountability as an accounting concept. The main aim of the paper is to find the common elements of these two approaches. The stakeholder theory is based on the stakeholder concept, and the accountabilty concept on obligations to give an account and rights to know among interested parties. Both the stakeholder thinking and accountability concept are based on a more general responsibility thinking: someone being responsible for someone else for something. By combining the stakeholder thinking and accountabiliy concept it seems to be possible to form a framework for the functions of accounting and other information systems of an organisation.
45. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Tara J. Radin, Susan McTiernan Out of the Mouths of Leaders...: A Comparative Study of Nonprofit and For-profit Leadership Approaches as Manifested in Annual Management Letters
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Understanding the varied approaches to leadership remains an ongoing challenge, especially as it relates to different sorts of organizations. Of particular interest are the specific considerations to which leaders pay attention. The management letters contained in the annual reports of both for-profit and nonprofit organizations reveal the nature of many of these considerations. This paper examines the management letters contained in the annual reports of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in order to discern the major differences and similarities between the approaches of for-profit and nonprofit leaders. Through this research a number of themes emerge that lead to general conclusions regarding leadership.
46. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Sybille Sachs, Edwin Rühli, Daniel Peter Implementing the Stakeholder View: Changing Managers’ Values to Enhance Strategic Success
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Challenged by recent incidents as they occurred at Enron, WorldCom, Disney and Xerox, management has to rethink its values. In reality, it can be observed that some firms are already on a learning path to adopt a broader stakeholder-oriented view than before. In order to implement the stakeholder view better into strategic thinking of management, top managers have to change their values which are challenged by stakeholder-oriented incentives. Based on three comparative case studies some first propositions are developed.
47. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Brosh M. Teucher Employee Centered Convergent Stakeholder Model
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teaching and research issues, and case colloquium
48. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Josetta McLaughlin, Deborah Pavelka, Gerald McLaughlin Watchdog Organizations: Assessing the Integrity of Third-Party Organization Websites Providing Data and Information on Corporate Behavior
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This paper contains an overview of materials developed for a workshop designed to provide guidance for participants to be able to evaluate: 1) the types of websites, 2) the quality of those websites, and 3) the integrity of data available on the internet. The workshop identifies criteria that may be used to assess whether the data and information found on the websites are useable for research and teaching purposes. The focus is primarily on non-government websites concerned with corporate behavior and economic development, in particular "watchdog" or advocacy organizations. For purposes of the workshop, "watchdog" organizations are defined as not-for-profit organizations founded for the purpose of impacting a particular societal goal, such as discouraging corruption in the workplace.
49. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Sandra Waddock, Duane Windsor, Lance Moir, John F. Mahon The Business in Society Curriculum in Europe and the United States: A Comparative Analysis and Conversation
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50. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Duane Windsor The Business in Society Curriculum in Europe and the United States: A Comparative Analysis and Conversation, “An Open Letter on Business School Responsibility”
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In his formal presentation, the author summarized the main points made in his “An Open Letter on Business School Responsibility” (reprinted at the end of this document and earlier posted at <iabs.net>) and added further information and comments. AACSB should require for MBA and undergraduate curricula some course in business and society subjects as a condition of business school accreditation. The author suggests legislative policy to compel such a mandate might occur in the absence of voluntary AACSB action.
51. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Helen Juliette Muller Integrating American Indian Business in Contemporary Management Education
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Tribes in many parts of the U.S. are exercising their sovereign rights to create sustainable economic infrastructures to generate employment opportunities and businesses enterprises, yet college education for management and business continues to be drawn from mainstream management courses. This article analyzes one unique effort at addressing the subject matter of American Indian business and management in a business school curriculum in which three models emerged. Distinct features of native business and management that differ fundamentally from the dominant culture are explored; the paper concludes with management education implications.
52. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
IABS 2003 Reviewers
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53. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Stephanie A. Welcomer About These Proceedings
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54. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Acknowledgment of Former Presidents, Conference Chairs, and Proceedings Editors
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55. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
International Association for Business and Society 2002-2003 Board of Directors and Leadership
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56. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
Author Index
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57. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2003
IABS 2002 Program (By Session Order and Category)
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