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Displaying: 41-60 of 927 documents


book reviews
41. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Andrew Packman Disciplined by Race: Theological Ethics and the Problem of Asian American Identity, by Ki Joo Choi
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42. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Julie Mavity Maddalena Raising White Kids: Bringing Up Children in a Racially Unjust America, by Jennifer Harvey
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43. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Mary Beth Yount Journal of Moral Theology, Special Issue on Contingency and Catholic Colleges, edited by Matthew J. Gaudet and James Keenan, S.J.
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44. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Ramon Luzarraga Russian Orthodoxy and the Russo-Japanese War, by Betsy Perabo
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45. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
David L. Stubbs Orthodox Christian Perspectives on War, edited by Perry T. Hamalis and Valerie A. Karras
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46. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Kristyn Sessions ¡Presente! Nonviolent Politics and the Resurrection of the Dead, by Kyle B. T. Lambelet
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47. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Stewart Herman Christianity, Politics and the Predicament of Evil: A Constructive Theological Ethic of Soulcraft and Statecraft, by Bradley B. Burroughs
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48. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Isaac Kim The Immortal Commonwealth: Covenant, Community, and Political Resistance in Early Reformed Thought, by David P. Henreckson
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49. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Anthony F. LoPresti Good Intentions: A History of Catholic Voters’ Road from Roe to Trump, by Steven P. Millies
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50. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Luke Bretherton An Ecological Theology of Liberation: Salvation and Political Ecology, by Daniel P. Castillo
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51. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Christine Darr Gratitude for the Wild: Christian Ethics in the Wilderness, by Nathaniel Van Yperen
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52. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Neil Messer On Animals, Volume 2: Theological Ethics, by David L. Clough
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53. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Mara Fitzgibbon Adams Diverse Voices in Modern US Moral Theology, by Charles E. Curran
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54. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Emily Dubie Spirit and Capital in an Age of Inequality, edited by Robert P. Jones and Ted A. Smith
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55. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Sarah Azaransky Everyday Ethics: Moral Theology and the Practices of Ordinary Life, edited by Michael Lamb and Brian A. Williams
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56. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Dallas J. Gingles Jean Bethke Elshtain: Politics, Ethics, and Society, edited by Debra Erickson and Michael Le Chevallier
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57. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1
Preface
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selected essays
58. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1
Ryan Darr The Virtue of Justice and the Justice of Institutions: Aquinas on Money and Just Exchange
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Justice, according to Thomas Aquinas, is a personal virtue. Modern theorists, by contrast, generally treat justice as a virtue of social institutions. Jean Porter rightly argues that both perspectives are necessary. But how should we conceive the relationship between the virtue of justice and the justice of institutions? I address this question by drawing from Aquinas’s account of the role of the convention of money in mediating relations of just exchange. Developing Aquinas’s account, I defend two conclusions and raise one problem. The conclusions are: (1) Aquinas does presuppose the need for just institutions in just relations; (2) Aquinas highlights the importance of an underappreciated consideration: the way institutions mediate just or unjust relationships. The problem, which naturally arises from bringing together the virtue of justice and the justice of institutions, is whether and how individuals can act justly in a context of structural injustice.
59. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1
Elisabeth Rain Kincaid Professional Ethics and the Recovery of Virtue
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In my paper I argue that developments within legal ethics—specifically a return to emphasizing the importance of precepts for governing communities capable of forming virtue and for protecting the vulnerable—can contribute to discussions in theological ethics regarding the rule of precepts for the church’s formation of its members in virtue. This concern is especially timely given the recent sex abuse scandals in Protestant and Catholic churches, which have raised wide-spread concerns about the capacity of churches to form character and protect the vulnerable. I consider how this understanding of the relationship between the role of precepts and the community, drawn from legal professional ethics, has important analogical similarities to Aquinas’s description of the virtue of religion. I then consider how Francisco Suárez, SJ, develops Aquinas’s theory to explain how rules are developed within the community, not simply imposed from above, and serve to protect the vulnerable.
60. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1
James McCarty The Power of Hope in the Work of Justice: Christian Ethics after Despair
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This essay engages Miguel De La Torre’s proposal to “embrace hopelessness” and argues that Christians should hold on to hope. The author places De La Torre’s argument in conversation with others who have written on hope and hopelessness and excavates two main weaknesses in his argument: first, a definition of hope that does not stand up to a review of the literature on the topic, especially as advocated by scholars from oppressed communities, and, second, a proposal for hopelessness that does not address how it can contribute to sustainable social transformation. The author then defends hope by drawing on the theological labor and lived experience of oppressed people who utilize hope to empower transformative social action.