Cover of The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly
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Displaying: 41-60 of 1729 documents


essays
41. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
Miguel Angel Endara Augustine on Sex and the Neurochemistry of Attachment
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Secular culture often advocates for the liberation of human libido and views Christian morality as a source of damaging restrictions. However, closer examination of Church teaching reveals a depth of understanding of human nature not found in contemporary secular culture. One Church father in particular, St. Augustine, offers a keen understanding of human sexuality and its importance not only as a means of promulgating the human race but also as a means of fostering the sort of spousal unity that improves life in general. Studies of neurochemistry seem to confirm much of what Augustine claimed about human sexuality over fifteen hundred years ago.
42. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
Deacon Gregory K. Webster Broadening the View of Catholic Social Teaching and the Cost of Pharmaceuticals
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Catholic Social Teaching (CST), in considering economic and patient justice, calls for “participating in patient care.” Corporations often are accused of not paying their fair share, which in turn has led to demands for government regulation to lower drug prices in the United States. Meanwhile, the millions of dollars spent by pharmaceutical foundations to help lower-income patients is not seen as corporations’ taking such responsibility to assist patients. The view that CST demands lower costs for prescription pharmaceuticals from corporations that make excess profits misapplies CST principles and does not consider the pricing structure for drugs on a global scale. While a preferential option for the poor is needed, there needs to be a better definition of the poor. This paper looks to broaden the view of CST in regard to corporations and the preferential option for the poor when applied to the current cost of pharmaceuticals.
articles
43. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
Br. Columba Thomas, OP, MD Improving Spiritual Care at the End of Life by Reclaiming the Ars moriendi: The Art of Dying as a Remedy for Souls
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Ars moriendi, or The Art of Dying, was a highly influential fifteenth-century text designed to guide dying persons and their loved ones in Catholic religious practices at a time when access to priests and the sacraments was limited. Given recent challenges related to the coronavirus pandemic, there is a heightened need to offer additional forms of guidance related to death and dying. This essay examines the content of the Ars moriendi and considers how key principles from the work apply to the current context. The Ars moriendi, in its direct approach to the salvation of souls and thoughtful treatment of struggles faced by dying persons, offers a much-needed supplement to typical approaches to death and dying today.
44. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
Br. Matthew T. Warnez, BH The Ethics of Organ Donation after Cardiac Death
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Organ donations after cardiac death account for about 20 percent of all vital-organ transplantations in the United States. This article evaluates DCDs in light of the Catholic moral tradition. Certain premortem interventions commonly associated with DCDs (intended to protect target organs from asystolic deterioration) are morally impermissible even though the injuries they inflict on the patient are ostensibly inconsequential. More importantly, the criteria used for expeditiously assaying circulatory death—criteria which enhance the effectiveness of DCDs—do not always guarantee that the donor is actually deceased. Unless DCD protocols attend to these ethical problems, Catholic hospitals are obliged to abandon the practice.
45. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
Rev. W. Jerome Bracken, CP Determining Ordinary Means of Caring for the Sick Using Three Simple Questions
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This article has two purposes. The first is to show how one can know in a simple way what is an ordinary and obligatory means to care for a person with a serious illness. Using the information at hand, one must be able to answer yes to each of these three questions: “Is this the ordinary, usual, or valid way of treating this illness?” “Is it working?” “Is it within the capacity of the patient to undergo and of the caregivers to administer?” The second purpose of the article is to show the moral validity of these questions, using a historical overview of theological and magisterial teaching and a systematic analysis and moral testing of the three questions.
verbatim
46. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith Excerpts from Samaritanus bonus: On the Care of Persons in the Critical and Terminal Phases of Life
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notes & abstracts
47. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
Kevin Wilger Science
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48. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
John S. Sullivan, MD Medicine
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49. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
Christopher Kaczor Philosophy and Theology
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book reviews
50. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
Kevin Wilger Untangling Twinning: What Science Tells Us about the Nature of Human Embryos by Maureen L. Condic
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51. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
Christopher James Wolfe John Rawls: Reticent Socialist by William A. Edmundson
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52. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
J. Brian Benestad The Breakdown of Higher Education by John Ellis
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53. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
Brian Welter By Man Shall His Blood Be Shed by Edward Feser and Joseph Bessette
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54. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
Erik Lenhart, OFM Cap Values at the End of Life: The Logic of Palliative Care by Roy Livne
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55. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
John Keown Unborn Human Life and Fundamental Rights: Leading Constitutional Cases under Scrutiny edited by Pilar Zambrano and William L. Saunders
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56. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 4
Index
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57. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3
Edward J. Furton In This Issue
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58. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3
William L. Saunders Washington Insider
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essays
59. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3
Servais Pinckaers Reflections on Veritatis splendor
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The encyclical Veritatis splendor represented a renewal of moral theology in the spirit of Vatican Council II. Pope St. John Paul II emphasized Gospel teaching in light of the Old Testament, reiterating the animating role of the Holy Spirit in the New Law. Properly understood, the New Law is not a code of obligations, but a dynamic life of charity made intelligible through grace and the natural law. As a primary connection between human beings and divine law, natural law inclines persons toward the good, thus providing an apprehensible link between human freedom and objective truth—enabling us to determine what is good and evil. This understanding of judgment provides a corrective for theological trends toward proportionalism and consequentialism.
60. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco, OP To the Sickest or to the Healthiest?: Ventilator Allocation during Time of Pandemic
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The COVID-19 pandemic has raised questions about the just allocation of limited medical resources. In this essay, I consider four pressing moral questions raised by the scarcity of mechanical ventilators, using the guiding principle that the primary criterion should be the conviction that each and every human being has equal moral status because each has an intrinsic dignity that makes him or her inestimable and inviolable. I propose that any legitimate criteria for ventilator allocation cannot discriminate among patient populations on the basis of any judgments that are not medically relevant. Instead, ventilators should be distributed solely on the basis of the likelihood that they will benefit patients and enable them to heal.