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Displaying: 41-57 of 57 documents


41. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Stephen Jarosek Soolisuse semiootika: Valikust saab harjumusseos, saab soov, saab vajadus. Kokkuvõte
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42. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Stephen Jarosek Семиотика сексуальности: выбор становится привычкой, желанием, потребностью. Резюме
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43. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Leonid Tchertov Perceptographic code in visual culture
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Visual culture can be considered from semiotic point of view as a system of visual codes. Several of them have natural routs. So the perceptual code is formed already on biological level mediating translation of sensory data into perceptual images of the spatial world. The means of natural perceptual code are transformed in culture, where they are involved in communication by depictions. The depiction on the flat performs the function of a “perceptogram”, which, on one hand, is an external record of an internal perceptual image or an idea, and, on the other hand, serves as a program for a spectator’s visual perception. The means of this “perceptography” form an artificial code, which is, on the contrary to the perceptual code, communicative, deliberately used and transformed in various ways at different periods of time in diverse kinds of practical and artistic activity. Not all perceptograms become pieces of art, but all history of pictorial arts can be considered as a process of development and mastering with the different versions of this perceptographic code. The changes of this code in visual culture are connected with the intrinsic development of “vision forms” as well with invention of external means of communication.
44. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Leonid Tchertov Перцептографический код в визуальной культуре. Резюме
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45. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Leonid Tchertov Pertseptograafiline kood visuaalkultuuris. Kokkuvõte
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theory of semiosphere
46. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Peeter Torop Semiosphere and/as the research object of semiotics of culture
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Since 1984 when J. Lotman’s article “On semiosphere” was published, this concept has been moving from one terminological field to another. In the disciplinary terminological field of the Tartu–Moscow School semiotics of culture, ‘semiosphere’ is connected with terms ‘language — secondary modelling system — text — culture’. From interdisciplinary terminological fields, the associations either with biosphere and noosphere, or with logosphere, are more important. As a metadisciplinary concept, semiosphere belongs to the methodology of culture studies and is associated with the concepts of holism and the part and the whole. In this context, semiosphere marks the complementarity of disciplines studying culture, the movement towards the creation of general culture studies and “understanding methodology”. On the background of the contemporary trends of science it has to be remembered that semiosphere is simultaneously an object- and a metaconcept. The dynamism of culture as a research object forces science to search for new description languages but the new description languages in turn influence the cultural dynamics as they offer new possibilities for self-description. Often, however, from a historical perspective, a new description language is nothing but a methodological translation. Thus also the term semiosphere joins together several concepts that are related to semiotics of culture and that have gained new relevance on the background of the culture’s developmental dynamics. The concept of semiosphere brings semiotics of culture again into contact with its history, as it also brings applicational cultural analysis into contact with the history of culture and with the newest phenomena in culture. These contacts determine the place of the semiotics of culture among the sciences studying culture.
47. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Peeter Torop Семиосфера и/как объект исследования семиотики культуры. Резюме
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48. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Peeter Torop Semiosfäär ja/kui kultuurisemiootika uurimisobjekt. Kokkuvõte
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49. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Kalevi Kull Semiosphere and a dual ecology: Paradoxes of communication
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This article compares the methodologies of two types of sciences (according to J. Locke) — semiotics, and physics — and attempts thereby to characterise the semiotic and non-semiotic approaches to the description of ecosystems. The principal difference between the physical and semiotic sciences is that there exists just a single physical reality that is studied by physics via repetitiveness, whereas there are many semiotic realities that are studied as unique individuals. Seventeen complementary definitions of the semiosphere are listed, among them, semiosphere defined as the space of qualitative (incommensurable) diversity. It is stated that, paradoxically, diversity, being a creation of communication, can also be destroyed due to excessive communication.
50. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Kalevi Kull Семиосфера и двоякая экология: парадоксы коммуникации. Резюме
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51. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Kalevi Kull Semiosfäär ja kahetine ökoloogia: Kommunikatsiooniparadoksid. Kokkuvõte
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52. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Linnar Priimägi The problem of the autocatalytic origin of culture in Juri Lotman’s cultural philosophy
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The origin of culture remains in the sphere of hypotheses. Although the hypotheses derive from two presumptions: first, how the structure of culture is envisaged, and secondly, how culture is thought to function. Juri Lotman dealt with both aspects of culture, initially the structural and typological and later the dynamic aspects. Thereby, he arrived at the culturalphilosophical hypothesis of the autocatalytic origin of culture. A catalyst is a component of a chemical reaction which itself doesn’t transform during the reaction, but whose presence is needed to guarantee the reaction (or to stimulate it). Thus, autocatalysis is a paradoxical situation in which the genesis of something presumes the pre-existence of the final product. The paradox of the autocatalysis of culture lies in the fact that culture cannot emerge from anything other than from culture itself, from its own germination. In 1988, speaking about the autocatalysis of culture, Lotman refered tothe cultural historicist Nikolai I. Konrad (1891–1970), who undoubtedly borrowed this idea from Jacob Christopher Burckhardt (1818–1897). This undiscovered connection reminds us of the fact, that a model for autocatalysis (or an autopoiesis) was basic to Naturphilosophie of the 19th century. In the 20th century, this was represented by Vladimir I. Vernadsky (1863–1945), from whom Lotman in 1982 received the impetus to formulate the concept of semiosphere as well as of the autocatalysis of culture. The autocatalysis model of culture is culturally diachronical, the semiosphere is, however, a synchronical one. In both cases, the natural philosophical cytology of the 19th century was Lotman’s semiotical meta-language.
53. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Linnar Priimägi Kultuuri autokatalüütilise päritolu problem Juri Lotmani kultuurifilosoofias. Kokkuvõte
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54. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Linnar Priimägi Проблема автокаталитичности культуры в философии культуры Юрия Лотмана. Резюме
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55. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Juri Lotman, Wilma Clark On the semiosphere
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This article, first published in Russian in 1984 in Sign Systems Studies, introduces the concept of semiosphere and describes its principal attributes. Semiosphere is the semiotic space, outside of which semiosis cannot exist. The ensemble of semiotic formations functionally precedes the singular isolated language and becomes a condition for the existence of the latter. Without the semiosphere, language not only does not function, it does not exist. The division between the core and the periphery is a law of the internal organisation of the semiosphere. There exists boundary between the semiosphere and the non- or extra-semiotic space that surrounds it. The semiotic border is represented by the sum of bilingual translatable “filters”, passing through which the text is translated into another language (or languages), situated outside the given semiosphere. The levels of the semiosphere comprise an inter-connected group of semiospheres, each of them being simultaneously both participant in the dialogue (as part of the semiosphere) and the space of dialogue (the semiosphere as a whole).
theory of semiosphere
56. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Juri Lotman О семиосфере. Резюме
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57. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Juri Lotman Semiosfäärist. Kokkuvõte
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