Cover of International Journal of Philosophical Practice
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Displaying: 61-80 of 112 documents


61. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Yen-Shan Ho A Counselee’s Relationship with his Mother
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62. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Ho-Ling Hsu A Ph.D. Student’s Anxiety about his Qualitfication Exam for the Ph.D. Degree
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63. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Le-Chen Tsui Catholics vs. Theologians: Anger on the Dereliction of Duty
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64. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Stephen R. Palmquist Kant’s Categories and Jung’s Types as Perspectival Maps To Stimulate Insight in a Counseling Session
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After coining the term “philopsychy” to describe a “soul-loving” approach to philosophical practice, especially when it welcomes a creative synthesis of philosophy and psychology, this article identifies a system of geometrical figures (or “maps”) that can be used to stimulate reflection on various types of perspectival differences. The maps are part of the author’s previously established mapping methodology, known as the Geometry of Logic. As an illustration of how philosophy can influence the development of psychology, Immanuel Kant’s table of twelve categories and Carl Jung’s theory of psychological types are shown to share a common logical structure. Just as Kant proposes four basic categories, each expressed in termsof three subordinate categories, Jung proposes four basic person­ality functions, each having three possible manifestations. The concluding section presents four scenarios illustrating how such maps can be used in philosophical counseling sessions to stimulate philopsychic insight.
65. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Elliot D. Cohen The Metaphysics of Logic-Based Therapy
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This article examines four key metaphysical assumptions of LBT regarding human emotions, human fallibility, reality, and human freedom. By way of examining these assumptions it shows how the theory of LBT systematically integrates philosophy and logic into a cognitive-behavioral approach to philosophical practice.
66. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Samuel Zinaich, Jr. Elliot D. Cohen on the Metaphysics of Logic-Based Therapy
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In this essay I consider the question of whether Elliot D. Cohen has justified sufficiently the metaphysical basis for his Logic-Based Therapy as presented in his paper on “The Metaphysics of Logic-Based Therapy (IJPP, this issue). Although Cohen discusses four different foundations of his cognitive theory, I focus only on one. It is the most important basis of his theory, viz., that human beings logically deduce the cognitive-behavior com­ponents of their emotions from premises. First, I question Cohen’s analysis of the emotion rules we use to deduce evaluations of actions from. Second, I challenge Cohen’s view that we deduce our evaluations from emotion rules. Although I do not think my challenges completely undermine Cohen’s theory, they do raise serious concerns for a theory faced with a preponderance of causal therapies.
67. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Bruce W. Fraser From Muthos to Logos: Myth, Metaphor, and Logic-Based Therapy
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This paper examines the role of myth and metaphor in Logic-Based Therapy as these pertain to the development and use of philosophical antidotes. It maintains that the use of myth and metaphor in LBT can provide a primer for counselees for constructing antidotes for overcoming the real life problems for which they seek counseling.
68. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Ben Mijuskovic Theories of Consciousness, Therapy, and Loneliness
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The article offers a brief set of definitions of metaphysical and epistemological principles underlying three distinct theories of consciousness and then relates these paradigms to a triad of contemporary therapeutic modalities. Accordingly, it connects materialism, empiricism, determinism and a passive interpretation of the “mind”=brain to medication interventions and behavioral and cognitive treatments. In this context, the paper proceeds to argue that these treatment approaches are theoretically incapable of addressing the dominant issue of man’s loneliness, and his struggle to escape from it, as the most basic universal drivein human beings. Next, it discusses the dualist, idealist, and rationalist assumptions of an active reflexive, self-consciousness, which has dominated insight-oriented treatment methodologies since Freud. And, finally, it treats the Hesperian and Sartre an phenomenological andexistential descriptions of awareness as grounded in the transcen­dent principle of intentionality emphasizing the aspects of the freedom of consciousness. Lastly, it claims that the first view stresses the temporal present; the second the past; and the third the future.
69. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Antony R. White, Tarrell Awe Agahe Portman Aligning Existentialism with Developmental Supervision: Embracing the Psychological Instant
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Despite the readily available discussion on counseling supervision models for over a quarter of a century, there is little attention in the literature with respect to how developmental supervision models align with existential philosophy. One model, The Integrated Developmental Model (IDM), is a robust and well-accepted model of supervision with embedded undertones of existentialism requiring scholarly discussion. The primary goal of this article is to emphasize the parallels between the IDM and Sartre’s philosophical principles of existentialism thereby creating a meaning making framework for supervisors to enhance developmental growth of their supervisees.
70. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 2 > Issue: 4
Maria daVenza Tillmanns Philosophical Counseling: Understanding the Unique Self and Other through Dialogue
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Many philosophical counselors seem to be counselors who use or point to phil­osophical texts or use abstract indeed logical or rational methods when working with a client. I want to introduce the idea of a counseling philosopher, who uses the client’s own concrete experiences as the basis for philosophizing with the client about the nature of the client’s dilemma - using ‘the between’ (Buber) as that special creative space where one em­ploys the art of philosophizing to the unique situation. Otherwise, the particularity of that client gets subsumed under theory or methods, much like what has happened in psychology and which gave rise to Achenbach’s criticisms of psychology/psychiatry. The dialogical of which Buber and Friedman speak is the give and take between client and counseling philosopher of understanding and expanding perceptions confirmed through the actual relationship. Philosophy as an art (and not a method) helps us restore the trust Buber talks about which allows us to engage the world directly and not through categories of thought grounded in psychological or philosophical texts and theories.
71. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 2 > Issue: 4
Elliot D. Cohen Absolute Nonsense: The Irrationality of Perfectionistic Thinking
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This paper shows how Logic-Based Therapy can constructively employ philosophical theories (such as those of Augustine, Aquinas, Spinoza, Hume, and Epictetus) as potent antidotes to the fallacy of Demanding Perfection.
72. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 2 > Issue: 4
Bruce W. Fraser Comments on Elliot Cohen’s “Absolute Nonsense: The Irrationality of Perfectionist Thinking”
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These comments on Cohen’s paper (IJPP, this issue) focus on the question of whether Cohen’s attempt to derive antidotes from incompatible or contradictory philosophical camps— such as Hume’s subjective theory of beauty, on the one hand, and Augustine’s objectivist account—present a fatal problem for Cohen’s LBT. The paper concludes with suggesting a constructive way around the problem.
73. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 2 > Issue: 4
Samuel Zinaich, Jr. Janet Staab on Philosophical Coaching as Engaged Pedagogy
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In this essay, I critically analyze Janet Staab’s view of engaged pedagogy, as a basis for philosophical coaching. I argue that Staab’s approach fails to address two major issues faced by counselors within a counseling context. First, Staab’s position does not appreciate the need for an appropriate psychical distance between coach and client, one needed to understand the client’s problems. Second, although Staab addresses the need to handle conflicts that may arise between coach and client, her viewpoint does not recognize the value of how it is possible to empower the client even if the choices and outlooks of the client clash with the coach’s own values.
74. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 2 > Issue: 3
Hakam Al-Shawi The Role of Philosophical Courage in Philosophical Counseling
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Traditionally we are familiar with at least two forms of courage: physical and moral. But the virtue has other forms which have not been widely recognized. One such form is “psychological courage” required to overcome psychological problems. Another form is “philosophical courage” required for philosophical counseling. In this paper, I argue that whether implicitly or explicitly, both counselor and client need courage, in its form as “philosophical courage,” for successful counseling. Moreover, the degree of such courage in both client and counselor will determine the extent to which issues are brought into question.
75. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 2 > Issue: 3
Kate Mehuron The Depathologization of Everyday Life: Implications for Philosophical Counseling
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Philosophical counseling offers a depathologizing practice that can benefit both the practitioner and the client. Philosopher Michel Foucault’s account of biopower is a useful analytic of the psychopathologization of everyday life, and can show the social signif­icance of philosophical practice. This essay critiques the conflation, by some philosophical practitioners, of the medical disease model and all psychotherapeutic methods. Foucault’s conflation of human normativity and normalization is also critiqued. Historian of science Georges Canguilhem’s alternative account of human normativity within the medical disease model is offered as an antidote to the conflations by these philosophical practitioners and Foucault. Philosophical practitioners ought to give up objectivist claims to value neutrality and acknowledge that the interventions of philosophical counseling in clinical diagnostic discourses are normative, theory-laden, and politically significant.
76. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 2 > Issue: 3
William H. J. Marten A Theoretical Model of Fragile Authenticity Structure
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An increasingly number of patients in Western civilizations suffer from weak authenticity structure which is characterized by a lack of self-realization, autonomy, character strength, stereotype behavior, inability to use (internal) dialogue in order to learn about oneself and defining oneself as a individual, and so on. In this paper a theoretical model of fragile authenticity structure and some suggestions to regain a more authentic attitude are presented.
77. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 2 > Issue: 3
Carol Miller For What are We Born to Become?: The Logotherapy of Dr. Victor Frankl
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For what are we born to become as Homo Sapiens? This question is answered in this article on the logotherapy of Dr. Viktor Frankl. This article commences with an exploration of human ontology guided by the philosophy of existentialism. This exploration leads to a continuation of this article by an explanation of logotherapy in theoretical principles and therapeutic processes. This explanation leads to the conclusion of this article by an application of logotherapy in three cases. This article is written with a creative synthesis that engages philosophical thoughts and psychological practices for logotherapists in the 21st Century.
78. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 2 > Issue: 3
Rajshri Jobanputra The Theory of ‘Selfism’—Man as a Hero
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Based on my experience as a philosophical counselor for the last two years, in this paper I attempt to describe the perception of life a young mind carries with him when faced with the challenges of life and the typical approaches adopted by him in order to endure them. Subsequent to this I attempt to build the theory of ‘selfism’ explicating the humanistic essence that each individual is not just responsible for the realization of his aspiration but also possesses the power within him to achieve it. This power within an individual is identi­fied by the survival kit he owns consisting of a rational approach to crisis situation, a central purpose vis-à-vis which all daily actions are aligned to and a strong sense of self-worth.
79. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
Elliot D. Cohen Philosophy with Teeth: The Be Wedding of Philosophical and Psychological Practices
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The American Society for Philosophy, Counseling, and Psychotherapy (ASPCP) was founded on the premise that philosophical and psychological practices are interdependent and mutually supportive. While psychological practice can benefit from becoming more philosophical, the converse is also true. In contrast, the American Philosophical Practitioner’s Association, under the direction of Louis Marinoff, has driven a wedge between these two practices. In this paper, I show how philosophical therapies such as my own Log­ic-Based modality, and psychological therapies, especially Rational-Emotional Behavior Therapy (REBT) work together synergistically. I hold that the APPA bifurcation of psycho­logical from philosophical practice is artificial, impractical, and self-defeating. Further, I maintain that Marinoff’s position that there is a distinct class of “sane” clients appropriate for the latter form of therapy serves to propagate a dangerous popular stereotype, that clients who “need” conventional psychological therapy must therefore be “insane.”
80. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 2 > Issue: 2
James Stacey Taylor Comments on Professor Elliot Cohen, “Philosophy With Teeth”
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This paper comments on Cohen’s “Philosophy with Teeth” (also in this issue), and raises four questions surrounding the relationship between philosophy and psychology, most of which are requests for clarification from Cohen but two of which are more critical in character: Against Cohen’s claim that APPE disavows any intrinsic connection between philosophical counseling and psychology, it is suggested that this still leaves open the pos­sibility of an instrumental connection. And against Cohen’s claim that pure philosophy is “grist for the classroom” or for “stimulating discussions over coffee,” it is maintained that pure philosophy may have more “teeth” than what this suggests.