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Displaying: 61-80 of 131 documents


61. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 7
Muhammad Hozien Editorial
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62. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 7
Jon McGinnis Old Complexes and New Possibilities: Ibn Sīnā’s Modal Metaphysics in Context
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63. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 7
Zahra Abdollah Color in Islamic Theosophy: An Analytical Reading of Kubrā, Rāzī, Simnānī, and Kirmānī
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64. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 7
Mikayel Hovhannisyan Divine and Earthy Cities in Rasāʾil Ikhwān al-Ṣafāʾ: The Essence of Ikhwān al-Ṣafāʾ’s Social Philosophy
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65. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 7
Murad Idris Ibn Ṭufayl’s Critique of Politics
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book reviews
66. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 7
Muhammad Hozien Rasāʾil Ikhwān al-Ṣafāʾ
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67. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 6
Mohammed Rustom Editorial
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68. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 6
Maria Massi Dakake Hierarchies of Knowing in Mullā Ṣadrā’s Commentary on the Uṣūl al-kāfī
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69. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 6
David B. Burrell Mullā Ṣadrā’s Ontology Revisited
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70. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 6
Shigeru Kamada Mullā Ṣadrā’s imāma/walāya: An Aspect of His Indebtedness to Ibn ʿArabī
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71. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 6
Yanis Eshots “Substantial Motion” and “New Creation” in Comparative Context
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72. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 6
Zailan Moris Mullā Ṣadrā’s Eschatology in al-Ḥikma al-ʿarshiyya
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73. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 6
Mohammed Rustom The Nature and Significance of Mullā Ṣadrā’s Qurʾānic Writings
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book reviews
74. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 6
Robert J. Dobie The Act of Being: The Philosophy of Revelation in Mullā Sadrā
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75. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 6
Omar W. Nasim Mullā Ṣadrā and Metaphysics: Modulation of Being
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76. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 6
Ibrahim Kalin Knowledge in Later Islamic Philosophy: Mullā Ṣadrā on Existence, Intellect, and Intuition
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77. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 6
Sayeh Meisami The Fundamental Principles of Mulla Sadra’s Transcendent Philosophy
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78. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 5
Thérèse-Anne Druart Editorial
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79. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 5
Hulya Yaldir Ibn Sīnā and Descartes on the Origins and Structure of the Universe: Cosmology and Cosmogony
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This article begins with an examination of Ibn Sīnā’s conception of emanation and its origin within the Greek and Islamic philosophical traditions. Secondly, I present his view of the multiplicity of the universe from a single unitary First Cause, followed by a discussion of the function of the Active Intellect in giving rise to the existence of the sublunary world and its contents. In the second part of the article, I consider Cartesian cosmology, without, however, going into detail about what Descartes calls the ‘imaginary new world,’ the problems arising from the mechanical worldview. Note is made of the conflict between Descartes and the Scholastic and Orthodox Christian concept of cosmos. This article provides an account and comparison of Ibn Sīnā’s and Descartes’ portrayal of the origins and structure of the universe of both philosophers.
80. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 5
Mohamad Nasrin Nasir On God’s Names and Attributes: An Annotated Translation from Mullā Ṣadrā’s al-Maẓāhir al-ilāhiyya
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This article examines ḥikma as it was practiced by Ṣadr al-Dīn Shīrāzī, or Mullā Ṣadrā (d. 1640), in explaining the connection between the divine names and the attributes of God. This is done via a translation of the fourth part of his al-Maẓāhir al-ilāhiyya fī asrār al-ʿulūm al-kamāliyya [The loci of divine manifestations in the secrets of the knowledge of perfection]. Ḥikma, philosophy, as it is defined here, is the combination of rational demonstrations and spiritual unveiling. Shīrāzī’s philosophy is a synthesis of Ibn ʿArabī’s school of metaphysical unveiling, the Ishrāqī school led by Suhrawardī, and the rational school of the Peripatetics. The text is translated here for the first time, and includes annotations.