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Displaying: 61-80 of 1423 documents


the work of esther lightcap meek
61. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 3
Andrew Grosso Participation in Reality: Both Discovery and Invention
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This article uses Charles Taylor’s exposition of different forms of meaning as a way of analyzing some of the central themes of Esther Meek’s account of realism. The perspective Taylor provides encourages revisiting the way various elements of Meek’s argument align with one another, and helps highlight the importance of embodiment and the centrality of the person for all accounts of knowing and being.
62. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 3
Esther Lightcap Meek The Fundamental Question of Reality: A Response to My Interlocutors
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In this essay I respond to the assessments of my Contact with Reality provided by Stewart, Héder, Takaki, and Grosso. I clarify the book’s agenda as posing what I call the fundamental question of realism, i.e., whether reality is there. I distinguish this question from various realisms that describe specifics about what reality is like and how we through our knowing interact with it. This fundamental question exercises logical priority, has existential importance, and is timely in response to modernist epistemology. In addition to this question, my book also is motivated by what I call the “lodestar” of Polanyi’s epistemology: subsidiary/focal integration, issuing in contact with reality, with concomitant indeterminate future manifestations. Various decisions I made in Contact with Reality and my engagement of Polanyi’s work have generally been motivated by these two concerns. I conclude by responding selectively to specific matters raised by each interlocutor.
review articles
63. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 3
David Nikkel Personhood in a Poteatian, Post-Critical Vein
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This well-organized collection invites us to engage Poteat’s post-critical understanding of personhood. The essays on philosophical anthropology call us to responsible personhood as they focus on various topics, including Poteat’s teaching, the meaning of post-critical and how and when we should think critically, and the importance of place. The three essays engaging theology share a theme of our grounding through our embodiment in a relational, incarnational world. The final two essays, the last by Poteat, focus on Cézanne’s paintings as a thick material and mental enactive mindbodily process, in which the paintings “think themselves” in Cézanne and in the viewer.
64. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 3
Richard C. Prust Polanyi for Humanists: an Appreciation of the Work of William H. Poteat
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William Poteat’s work took Michael Polanyi’s post-critical thinking into humanistic fields. This paper explores some of the reflections of current philosophers on Poteat’s contributions.
journal and society information
65. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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66. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Notes on Contributors
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the work of matthew b. crawford
67. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Matthew B. Crawford Teachers and Students
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The transmission of knowledge requires trust, which is a moral relation between teacher and student. This relation requires the suspension of democratic/individualistic suspicion against the idea of intellectual rank and authority. Ultimately this is for the sake of an end that is affirmable by the lights of democratic individualism: the intellectual independence of the student. But education cannot itself be a democratic enterprise if it is to sustain deference to the idea of truth, as it must.
68. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Paul Lewis The Organ Maker’s Shop, Erotic Attention, Teaching, and Trust
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In response to Crawford’s presentation on teaching and trust, I note how Crawford’s latest book has helped me teach history of Christian ethics. I also highlight two Polanyian themes relevant to the topic: dwelling in/breaking out and intellectual passions. I then discuss additional challenges to developing trust between teachers and students.
69. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Collin D. Barnes Comments on Matthew Crawford’s The World Beyond Your Head
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Matthew Crawford invites readers to consider how their contact with the real world has been imperiled by the notion that all experience is mediated by mental representations and how skilled activities providing bodily contact with the environment help recover us from this mistaken perspective. In this brief presentation, I ask whether in his critique of mediated experience by appeal to physical skills Crawford neglects to appreciate Polanyi’s emphasis on intellectual probes as instruments for contacting reality and whether his doing so inappropriately—and perhaps inadvertently—diminishes the all-important place of belief in Polanyi’s epistemology.
70. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Richard W. Moodey Convivial Craft-Work and the Fiduciary Program
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Matthew Crawford compares his program of convivial craft-work to Polanyi’s fiduciary program. He argues that both are good ways of grappling with reality, and that both can help persons to focus their attention in an age of distraction. Crawford criticizes the Enlightenment philosophers for an overemphasis on the representations of things at the expense of grappling with the real things. He argues that attention is a scarce resource, analogous to water. He sometimes uses language that can be interpreted as expressing a belief in group minds.
articles
71. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Milton R. Scarborough Mapping Poteat on the Buddha and Zen
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Despite the fact that none of William H. Poteat’s former students on the Yale Conference email list recall ever having heard Poteat mention the Buddha or Buddhism, this article argues for a hitherto unnoticed and striking correspondence of thought between William H. Poteat, the Buddha, and Ch’an (Zen). Both the Buddha and Poteat bear closer analogies to physicians than to metaphysicians and their thought can be compared to a kind of philosophical therapy. While the Buddha’s diagnosis pinpoints egoistic desire as the cause of human dissatisfaction with life, Poteat’s diagnosis is gnostic apocalypticism. Both physicians are moved to employ unusual pedagogical methods in order to effect a “cure,” which consists of a fundamental unity or nonduality of mind and body, a therapy requiring a practice.
72. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Jon Fennell “Balance of Mind”: Polanyi’s Response to the Second Apple and the Modern Predicament
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Among the most arresting images in Personal Knowledge is “the second apple.” Through this metaphor Polanyi describes a fall of man comparable to the expulsion from paradise recounted in Genesis. But here, too, redemption is possible. It comes, says Polanyi, in the form of a maturation of perspective that he calls “balance of mind.” Under this heading Polanyi offers his conception of human fruition, a fruition requiring a loss of innocence that follows from not only departure from the original paradise but also the utter collapse of the allegedly autonomous citadel of critical reason that followed in its train. Interestingly, “balance of mind” has much in common with the Christian life, as understood by Polanyi. Thus, the encounter with “the second apple” is simultaneously both an advance and a return.
journal and society information
73. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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74. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Paul Lewis Preface
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james e. loder and michael polanyi
75. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Notes on Contributors
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on william h. poteat
76. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Dale Cannon Introduction to Poteat and Polanyi III
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77. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
David H. Nikkel Curing Dualistic, Disembodied Patterns of Thinking in the Academy
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This essay develops aspects and implications of Poteat’s critique of the Enlightenment’s critical paradigm and development of post-critical thinking in dialogue with Pascal in his dissertation and four post-critical thinkers who figured prominently in his project: Kierkegaard, Merleau-Ponty, Wittgenstein, and Polanyi. Then it critiques from a Poteatian perspective the critical, dualistic, discarnate picture that still dominates the academy, especially attending to the cognitive science of religion. CSR involves both a reductive physicalism involving unconscious mental mechanisms and a re-inscribing of subjectivistic or mentalist (alleged) beliefs in disembodied supernatural and human spirits.
78. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Murray Jardine The Political Implications of William H. Poteat’s Philosophy
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Since World War II, political theory has increasingly focused on the question of the origins and nature of the modern age. William H. Poteat’s explication of the Greek and Hebraic ontologies and his argument that modernity is the result of their incoherent combination in Christian theology can provide a framework to synthesize and extend the major competing theories about the modern era.
79. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Elon G. (Jerry) Eidenier Six Poems
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on epistemology
80. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Mihály Héder, Daniel Paksi Non-Human Knowledge According to Michael Polanyi
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Three recent interpreters of tacit knowledge, Harald Grimen, Harry Collins, and John McDowell, either deny it is appropriate to attribute knowledge of any sort to animals or ignore the relevance of the tacit knowledge of animals to human knowledge. In this article, we seek to show that in Michael Polanyi’s understanding, tacit knowledge in animals underlies and supports human explicit knowledge. For Polanyi, tacit knowledge arises in increasingly complex forms in evolutionary history, and explicit knowledge emerges from it. Both forms of knowledge are personal achievements that can be true or false; animal behavior is not simply deterministic. Polanyi’s view on non-human tacit knowledge thus explains features of human knowledge that those denying or ignoring non-human knowledge leave unexplained.