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Displaying: 81-100 of 245 documents


81. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 13
Angela Bleeker Should You Ever Tell a Lie?
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82. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 13
Margot Rashba The Good Student
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83. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 13
Scott Daniel The Madman in the Marketplace: A Critique of Nietzsche
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84. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 13
Ava Agopsowicz, Yura Campbell, Fiona Dark, Raven Landwehr, Amelia Lewis Ring of Gyges
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85. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 13
Ben Kronengold Dot, Dot, Dot
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86. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 13
Amber Makaiau Incorporating the Activity of Philosophy into Social Studies: A Seven-Part Philosophical Inquiry Process
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87. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 13
Mellissa Henry Discovering Ethics through Virtual Reality: SciEthics Interactive Project
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88. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 13
About the Contributors
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89. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 13
Assistance, Intent, and Offense
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90. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 12
Rory Kraft Editor’s Note
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91. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 12
Emma Holden, Elise Marek, Claire Torgelson, Hanna Weaver, Vera Jia Xi Mancini Who Can You Trust?
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After reading Barbara William’s picture book Albert’s Impossible Toothache, Jana Mohr Lone’s fourth grade students at Whittier Elementary School in Seattle discussed the relationship between telling a lie, telling the truth, and making a mistake, and how we know that we are talking about the same thing when we talk with someone. The discussion led to an exploration of why the things children say are often less likely to be believed than what adults say. This section contains six fourth grade students’ responses to the question: “Are children more or less trustworthy than adults?” These answers, the question they are responding to, and the book which inspired the discussion, all offer possibilities for further discussion.
92. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 12
Spencer Beaudette This is not Art
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Spencer Beaudette seeks to teach his fifth-grade students how to reject particular outlooks without declaring them altogether stupid or invalid. To achieve this, Beaudette discusses with his class what qualifies as art. He tasked his students to create something that they are sure is art and something that they are sure is not art. The students presented their works to the class for discussion. As Beaudette and his students found out, what qualifies as art is not an easy question to answer. However, Beaudette believes the lesson achieved the objective of teaching students opposing viewpoints exist that are not necessarily more right or wrong than our own.
93. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 12
Kids Philosophy Slam
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94. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 12
Philosophy Slam High School
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95. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 12
Tim Fisher Cogito ergo sum rectam (I think therefore I am right): A Student Misconception about Philosophy
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Tim Fisher examines a troubling misconception about philosophy that he noticed his high school students possessed: that when it comes to philosophy, you can never be wrong. He expected incoming philosophy students to hold this belief, but was surprised to learn that even after completing his course, students still held the belief that philosophy had no wrong answers—that all views are equally reasonable. Fisher began to wonder where he went wrong. To rectify this misconception, Fisher details an exercise that he developed for second graders that forces students to justify their beliefs and teaches them to examine why one claim is more or less reasonable than another; the exercise is equally appropriate for high school students. The key to this exercise is to teach students to detach personal opinions from their reasoning.
96. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 12
Tim McCarthy, Lucas Jackson Becoming, Learning, Being
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Tim McCarthy and Lucas Jackson present a short story in which a group of scientists successfully create a self-aware synthetic human being. Calling himself HBP, the machine begins to quickly learn and becomes curious about the world, life, and humanity. On his first trip alone outside of the lab, HBP accidentally kills a mugger. The encounter trouble him and HBP begins to wonder what happens to a being’s consciousness after life. McCarthy and Jackson use this story to explore the concept of the soul and religion, as well as to explore what it means to be human.
97. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 12
Ben Gorman Philosophy in Children’s Literature
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Ben Gorman reviews Philosophy in Children’s Literature by Peter R. Costello.
98. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 12
About the Contributors
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99. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 12
Ship of Theseus
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100. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 11
Renée Smith, Julinna Oxley The Summer Ethics Academy: Teaching Ethics to Young Leaders
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An overview of how the Summer Ethics Academy, at the Jackson Family Center for Ethics and Values at Coastal Carolina University—part of its outreachProgram—encourages children to develop desirable characteristics for middle school children to emulate. The article includes applicable project goals and activities.