Cover of Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical
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Displaying: 81-100 of 1454 documents


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81. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 45 > Issue: 1
Stan Scott Indwelling and Breaking Out: Language and Literature in Post-critical Perspective
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This essay explores how literature may be a way of educating readers in practice about the way tacit knowing works, and literary study may have an unexpected contribution to make to the larger field of post-critical thinking. I argue that literary metaphor is a manifestation of the tacit dimension of knowing and, by engaging with the dynamics of language in the text, the reader may allow himself to be educated in the workings of tacit knowing and its underlying rules. A simple image in a poem will call upon the creative imagination of the reader to search for meaning in the indeterminate referent. It will also call upon intuition to connect the dots between vehicle and tenor in metaphor, and form links with the life-world of the reader. When the reader of a literary text gets a sense of a “deepening coherence” of understanding, and intuition connects his life to the tacit dimension of language in the tenor of metaphor, the result may be discovery of some new sense of order or existential meaning.
82. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 45 > Issue: 1
Martin E. Turkis II Post-Critical Platonism: Preliminary Meditations on Ethics and Aesthetics in Iris Murdoch and Michael Polanyi
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This article explores intriguing resonances in the work of Michael Polanyi and Iris Murdoch, touching on ethics, aesthetics, epistemology, and ontology, as well as Murdoch’s literary output. In so doing, it begins to outline a phenomenological approach to Platonist virtue ethics informed by Murdoch’s work and drawing heavily on Polanyi’s post-critical epistemology; it also gestures toward how such an approach might be applied in the classroom.
83. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 45 > Issue: 1
Jon Fennell Author and Reader: Sense-Giving and Sense-Reading in C.S. Lewis’s “Good Reading”
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In An Experiment in Criticism, C.S. Lewis demonstrates why, within traditional academic circles, he is best known and most respected for his accomplishments in regard to the study of English literature. Lewis’s important monograph aims to illuminate a new direction in literary criticism, and succeeds marvelously. Interestingly, Lewis’s analysis is paralleled at every turn by Polanyian insights. We have therefore yet a further instance of the intersection of the thought of these two men, and we again wonder at the absence during their lives of recognition of one another.
84. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 45 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins Interview with Gábor István Bíró
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This interview with Gábor István Bíró reviews topics explored in his 2017 Budapest University of Technology and Economics dissertation on Polanyi’s work in economics education and on his diagrammatic film.
book review
85. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 45 > Issue: 1
Lindsay Atnip The Limits of Critique
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journal and society information
86. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 3
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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87. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 3
Paul Lewis Preface
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journal and society information
88. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 3
Notes on Contributors
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the work of esther lightcap meek
89. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 3
David James Stewart Getting in Touch with Polanyi’s Realism: An Examination of Esther Meek’s Contact with Reality
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This essay provides a general overview of Meek’s central arguments in Contact with Reality, focusing on her interpretation of Polanyi’s notion of “contact with reality” as it pertains to the viability of a distinctly Polanyian brand of realism. Special attention is given to Meek’s treatment of “indeterminate future manifestations” as the core of Polanyi’s epistemic realism and the implications of this for a theory of truth.
90. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 3
Mihály Héder Being Real and Contact with Reality
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In the first part of Contact with Reality, Meek provides a justification for Polanyi’s realism, a justification she suggests Polanyi himself did not fully articulate. In the second part of Contact with Reality, Meek explores her own shift in thinking about realism, one that relieves Polanyi of the burden of justification. I argue Polanyi’s account of the reality of persons and their evolutionary history—what he calls “ultrabiology”—provides the foundation of his epistemology and thus his realism.
91. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 3
Kyle Takaki Reality Crisscrossed
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It some important ways, Meek’s Contact with Reality (2017a) starts where Dreyfus and Taylor’s (2015) Retrieving Realism ends. What is at stake for Polanyians is the status of evolving metaphysical views anchored in Polanyi’s epistemic concerns. I sketch three metaphysical pictures, then focus on dialectically engaging with Meek in hopes of widening the dialogical space for differing Polanyian projects.
92. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 3
Andrew Grosso Participation in Reality: Both Discovery and Invention
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This article uses Charles Taylor’s exposition of different forms of meaning as a way of analyzing some of the central themes of Esther Meek’s account of realism. The perspective Taylor provides encourages revisiting the way various elements of Meek’s argument align with one another, and helps highlight the importance of embodiment and the centrality of the person for all accounts of knowing and being.
93. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 3
Esther Lightcap Meek The Fundamental Question of Reality: A Response to My Interlocutors
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In this essay I respond to the assessments of my Contact with Reality provided by Stewart, Héder, Takaki, and Grosso. I clarify the book’s agenda as posing what I call the fundamental question of realism, i.e., whether reality is there. I distinguish this question from various realisms that describe specifics about what reality is like and how we through our knowing interact with it. This fundamental question exercises logical priority, has existential importance, and is timely in response to modernist epistemology. In addition to this question, my book also is motivated by what I call the “lodestar” of Polanyi’s epistemology: subsidiary/focal integration, issuing in contact with reality, with concomitant indeterminate future manifestations. Various decisions I made in Contact with Reality and my engagement of Polanyi’s work have generally been motivated by these two concerns. I conclude by responding selectively to specific matters raised by each interlocutor.
review articles
94. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 3
David Nikkel Personhood in a Poteatian, Post-Critical Vein
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This well-organized collection invites us to engage Poteat’s post-critical understanding of personhood. The essays on philosophical anthropology call us to responsible personhood as they focus on various topics, including Poteat’s teaching, the meaning of post-critical and how and when we should think critically, and the importance of place. The three essays engaging theology share a theme of our grounding through our embodiment in a relational, incarnational world. The final two essays, the last by Poteat, focus on Cézanne’s paintings as a thick material and mental enactive mindbodily process, in which the paintings “think themselves” in Cézanne and in the viewer.
95. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 3
Richard C. Prust Polanyi for Humanists: an Appreciation of the Work of William H. Poteat
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William Poteat’s work took Michael Polanyi’s post-critical thinking into humanistic fields. This paper explores some of the reflections of current philosophers on Poteat’s contributions.
journal and society information
96. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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97. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Notes on Contributors
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the work of matthew b. crawford
98. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Matthew B. Crawford Teachers and Students
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The transmission of knowledge requires trust, which is a moral relation between teacher and student. This relation requires the suspension of democratic/individualistic suspicion against the idea of intellectual rank and authority. Ultimately this is for the sake of an end that is affirmable by the lights of democratic individualism: the intellectual independence of the student. But education cannot itself be a democratic enterprise if it is to sustain deference to the idea of truth, as it must.
99. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Paul Lewis The Organ Maker’s Shop, Erotic Attention, Teaching, and Trust
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In response to Crawford’s presentation on teaching and trust, I note how Crawford’s latest book has helped me teach history of Christian ethics. I also highlight two Polanyian themes relevant to the topic: dwelling in/breaking out and intellectual passions. I then discuss additional challenges to developing trust between teachers and students.
100. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 2
Collin D. Barnes Comments on Matthew Crawford’s The World Beyond Your Head
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Matthew Crawford invites readers to consider how their contact with the real world has been imperiled by the notion that all experience is mediated by mental representations and how skilled activities providing bodily contact with the environment help recover us from this mistaken perspective. In this brief presentation, I ask whether in his critique of mediated experience by appeal to physical skills Crawford neglects to appreciate Polanyi’s emphasis on intellectual probes as instruments for contacting reality and whether his doing so inappropriately—and perhaps inadvertently—diminishes the all-important place of belief in Polanyi’s epistemology.