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1. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 1
Editors and Facilitators
2. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 1
Suzanne Strauss High School Essays on Families
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Three upper level high school students write on the issues of gender roles in families and define the norm for acceptable behavior and structure for a traditional family. These issues expand on the ideal lifestyle for high school students, the norm of marriage, and step-parent responsibilities and boundaries.
3. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 1
David Shapiro What Do Rights Look Like?
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Arguing and examining the different fundamental rights and constitutional preferences that students obtain like “the right to worship as you choose”.
4. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 1
Resources and Ideas for Discussions about Children’s Rights
5. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 1
Dubi Bergstein Grownups and Children
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Bergstein, a 5th grade teacher, supervises three short narratives where 5th graders wrote regarding the relationships and responsibilities of grownups and children.
6. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 1
David A. White, Jennifer Thompson On Children’s Rights and Patience
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Teachers White and Thompson allowed students to explore the primary-source readings from several philosophers in a 5th grade course called Apogee. The essay is written with a focus on Patience and other virtues.
7. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 1
Wendy C. Turgeon Smithtown Middle School Great Book Discussion Group
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A group encompassed of three eighth grade respond to the etiquette of a classroom setting, the “fuzzy area” between adulthood and childhood, and basic accountability between the two categories through unbiased opinions in a philosophical environment.
8. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 1
Jana Mohr Lone Introduction
9. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 1
Rosana Aparecida, Fernandes de Oliveira, Walter Omar Kohan Philosophy, Childhood, and Subjectivity
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Functions and objectives serve as an incentive for children living in Brazil to question their role as a child in society.
10. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 1
Sara Goering Doing Philosophy with Young Students
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Goering argues that children, at any age, have the potential to utilize logic and generate philosophical thinking through role-playing yet challenging games. This activity fosters a philosophical imagination for children.
11. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 1
Editorial Board
12. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 1
Talya Birkhahn A Conversation with Children: Children’s Rights in School and at Home
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Birkhahn discusses children’s rights with 1st grade students through cultural perspectives. Playing or studying in adolescent years serves as a significant role in this discussion.
13. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 10
Corrections
14. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 10
Rory E. Kraft, Jr. From the Editor
15. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 10
Maughn Gregory New Research on Programs for Classroom Discussion
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Gregory explains nine educational approaches to discussing Philosophy with children. A general overview through analytical and critical reasoning explains the faults with Philosophy in an education setting and the authors feedback.
16. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 10
Alexandra Johnson Aristotle: Philosopher, Teacher, and Scientist; Socrates: Ancient Greek in Search of Truth
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A review article of the books "Aristotle: Philosopher, Teacher, and Scientist" by Sharon Katz Cooper; and "Socrates: Ancient Greek in Search of Truth" by Pamela Dell
17. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 10
Kelly Hickey Aristotelian Morality and Groundhogs: The Moral Evolution of Phil Connors
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Hickey discusses the moral philosophy of the film Groundhog’s Day and the impact on one man’s life from starting anew. Philosophical discussion continues with [the pivotal role] Phil’s meaning to life and his ongoing discovery of personal happiness.
18. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 10
Ariel Sykes Discussing Language with Children
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Sykes explores how society communicates and understands philosophy; Sykes further explains how easily misinterpreted—through generational gaps— the language tree is through terms like “happiness” and other non-verbal forms of communication.
19. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 10
Methow Valley Elementary Questions from Methow Valley Elementary
20. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 10
Matthew Lipmann’s Obituary