Narrow search


By category:

By publication type:

By language:

By journals:

By document type:


Displaying: 1-20 of 112 documents

0.419 sec

1. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Elliot D. Cohen The Psychoanalysis of Perfectionism: Integrating Freud’s Psychodynamic Theory into Logic-Based Therapy
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper sets the framework for a hybrid theory of Logic-Based Therapy and Psychoanalysis through an examination of Sigmund’s Freud’s theory of perfectionism.
2. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Laura Newhart Logic-Based Therapy and Consultation for Mentally Strong Women
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper explores the intersections between Elliot D. Cohen’s Logic-Based Therapy and Amy Morin’s "13 Things Mentally Strong Women Don’t Do" (HarperCollins 2019) with a focus on the ways that they shed light on and mutually support each other. With its six-step method (including the identification of Cardinal Fallacies, the refutation of those fallacies, the reinforcement of their corresponding Guiding Virtues, the use of Uplifting Philosophies, and the implementation of plans of action), Logic-Based Therapy and Consultation provides a systematic rational framework for understanding how our interpretation of facts and our opinions/value judgments about those facts interact in order to form habits, i.e., patterns of thoughts, feelings, and behavior, that can lead to a fulfilling or a not-so-fulfilling life. For its part, "13 Things that Mentally Strong Women Don’t Do" 1) helps us understand how these habits specifically affect women, 2) provides uplifting philosophies from a woman’s perspective, and 3) contributes to plans of actions by suggesting practical exercises for implementing these plans, all in order to help us develop those good habits or virtuous patterns of thought, feelings, and behavior that allow us to live our best lives.
3. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Arthur C. M. Li An LBT Session with a Psychoanalyst Client
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this LBT practicum, psychologist Arthur Li helps his psychoanalyst client to discover the synergy between LBT and psychoanalysis in exploring her relationship withher mother.
4. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Imi Lo An LBT Session with a Client Going Through a Breakup
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this practicum, Imi Lo helps her client who is confronting a recent breakup to key into her emotional reasoning, and to pinpoint a suppressed higher-order premise that has, for most of her adult life, stifled her potential for authentic happiness.
5. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Aeyanna Lucero Awfulize To the Core No More
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper demonstrates how philosophical works can be utilized in order to combat irrational rules of reasoning, namely Demanding Perfection and Awfulizing, associated with real-life thoughts and experiences of the author as a student.
6. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3
Barbara Piozzini Applying LBT in Group Settings
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This study is to show how the Logic-Based Therapy (LBT) method can be applied to groups in an attempt to point out possible risks and benefits of its application related to a group context. From observation and analysis a single practical case has been outlined, taking into consideration influence of group dynamics on the counselees’ cognitive processes during the LBT session. Judging from the analysis of the outlined results, it seems that intersubjectivity can play an important role if considered as a productive resource in the co-construction of a changing process among LBT group members during the application of its six steps. In particular, new research fields on the need to analyze LBT in groups have been opened, exploiting the possibility to consider the group as an autonomous entity, especially in long term counseling therapies.
7. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3
Simon Bertel Kristensen A Life in Balance: Using LBT to Overcome a Student’s Self-Defeating Reasoning
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper applies the six-step method of LBT in helping a student address an academic problem stemming from the demand for her mother’s approval.
8. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3
Ying-Fen Su Restless Anger: Applying Logic-Based Therapy to The Case of Zhou
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this paper, I discuss how, as part of the Logic-Based Therapy (LBT) Primary Certificate Program offered in Taiwan, I applied LBT to the case of Zhou, a fourth-year graduate school student in the Department of Guidance & Counseling.
9. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3
Angelo Mario Manassero The Six Steps LBT and Antidotes for Aurora’s Anxiety
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper shows how LBT can be useful in treating problems that emerged during a short session of philosophical practice with a client.
10. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 4 > Issue: 3
Ben Delgado Philosophical Practice During End of Life Care
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper applies Logic-Based-Therapy to the context of end of life decisions, with focus on how a medical practitioner can help patients rationally and philosophically confront the impending death of a loved one.
11. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 4 > Issue: 4
Laura Newhart Logic-Based Therapy and Civil Discourse in Fractious Times
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper explores the role that Elliot D. Cohen’s Logic-Based Therapy might play in restoring civility to public discourse in this era of social and political divisiveness. The contributions that Logic-Based Therapy, as a modality of philosophical counseling, might make to improving public discourse are explored through the lenses of Jonathan Haidt’s social intuitionist model of the formation of moral judgments and his Moral Foundations Theory of the development of general political perspectives, both articulated in Haidt’s The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion. In spite of substantial differences in Cohen’s and Haidt’s methodological approaches and theoretical content, the similarities are significant enough to allow opportunities for Logic-Based Therapy to intervene in important and effective ways to restore civil discourse in fractious times.
12. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 4 > Issue: 4
William Ferriolo Stoic Suicide: Death Before Dishonor
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Applying the Roman Stoic criteria for a defensible suicide, this paper argues that suicide in certain circumstances may not merely be permissible, but even morally preferable to the available alternatives, including survival until natural death or some other involuntary end.
13. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 4 > Issue: 4
Martha Lang Philosophical Counseling and the Network Theory of Well-Being, Revamped
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
The central goal of this article is to make the case that the revamped version of Michael Bishop’s Network Theory of Well-being, described in his 2015 book The Good Life: Unifying the Philosophy and Psychology of Well-Being, provides a worthwhile framework for philosophical counseling endeavors, including Logic-Based Therapy. In 2017, The Network Theory of Well-Being, Revamped emerged as a response to Bishop’s theory of well-being; the revamped version was also my dissertation, which I successfully defended and published that year. By appealing to a set of counter-examples, I argue that Bishop’s theory is missing an essential component; his positive causal network model of well-being allows for sever­al problematic cases which, upon investigation, demonstrate positive causal networks but cannot reasonably be considered examples of well-being. In revamping Network Theory, I argue that three additional criteria are required for well-being: authenticity, a bit of moral­ity, and some objective information. Altogether, these three criteria comprise what I call holistic authenticity. As such, the emergent theory of well-being declares that well-being is a matter of instantiating a holistically authentic positive causal network. This theory of well-being is the most reasonable notion of well-being for philosophical counseling because it is based on Network Theory’s inclusive method, which requires that the philosophy of well-being join forces with the science of well-being.
14. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 4 > Issue: 4
Ross Channing Reed Depression, Anxiety, Powerlessness and Irrational Belief in Unlimited Individual: Possibility as a Consequence of Ubiquitous Systemic Terror
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Systemic existential conditions are indelible aspects of a client’s reflective and non-reflective modes of consciousness. These conditions impinge upon a client’s ability and willingness to think through his/her situation in the world, as this may serve to highlight the terror of living. Depression, anxiety, and a sense of powerlessness, in conjunction with a contradictory belief in unlimited individual possibility are often translations of and reaction formations against the ontological experience of terror. The problematic nature of terror, as such, is discussed, as are its effects upon those who seek counseling. Sources of terror include but are not limited to the increasing monetization of all facets of contemporary post-Modern society, the collapse of the possibility of a democratic society, the renewed global arms race, the increasing debt load shouldered by individuals, the destruction of liberal arts education, and the wholesale disregard of basic human rights as enumerated in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In sum, an artificially created state of nature could account for currently existing conditions of terror and the attendant consequences of that terror: depression, anxiety, a sense of powerlessness, and an irrational belief in unlimited individual possibility.
15. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 4 > Issue: 4
Winson Y.H. Tang The Case of Mr. H: Applying Buddhism in LBT
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this paper, I discuss how the six-steps procedure of LBT can be applied to the case of Mr. H., who believes that it is reasonable for him to feel hopeless for his future. During the practicum session, we explore his emotional reasoning, identify and refute cardinal fallacies in the premises, and identify guiding virtues according to the fallacies. Further, according to Mr. H’s preference, we explore and apply the uplifting philosophy associated with the ideas of Buddhism. I conclude the paper with reflections on how both Mr. H and myself learnt from this valuable experience.
16. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 4 > Issue: 4
Jennifer Dowell A Case of Global Damnation: Applying the Six Steps of Logic-Based Therapy
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper will explain and implement Logic-Based Therapy’s six-step philosophical practice to address and overcome the fallacy of Global Damnation. The premises and conclusions in the faulty thinking will be constructed, identified, and refuted, the guiding virtue will be identified, and philosophical antidotes will be constructed and applied.
17. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Stephen R. Palmquist Kant’s Categories and Jung’s Types as Perspectival Maps To Stimulate Insight in a Counseling Session
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
After coining the term “philopsychy” to describe a “soul-loving” approach to philosophical practice, especially when it welcomes a creative synthesis of philosophy and psychology, this article identifies a system of geometrical figures (or “maps”) that can be used to stimulate reflection on various types of perspectival differences. The maps are part of the author’s previously established mapping methodology, known as the Geometry of Logic. As an illustration of how philosophy can influence the development of psychology, Immanuel Kant’s table of twelve categories and Carl Jung’s theory of psychological types are shown to share a common logical structure. Just as Kant proposes four basic categories, each expressed in termsof three subordinate categories, Jung proposes four basic person­ality functions, each having three possible manifestations. The concluding section presents four scenarios illustrating how such maps can be used in philosophical counseling sessions to stimulate philopsychic insight.
18. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Elliot D. Cohen The Metaphysics of Logic-Based Therapy
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This article examines four key metaphysical assumptions of LBT regarding human emotions, human fallibility, reality, and human freedom. By way of examining these assumptions it shows how the theory of LBT systematically integrates philosophy and logic into a cognitive-behavioral approach to philosophical practice.
19. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Bruce W. Fraser From Muthos to Logos: Myth, Metaphor, and Logic-Based Therapy
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This paper examines the role of myth and metaphor in Logic-Based Therapy as these pertain to the development and use of philosophical antidotes. It maintains that the use of myth and metaphor in LBT can provide a primer for counselees for constructing antidotes for overcoming the real life problems for which they seek counseling.
20. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Samuel Zinaich, Jr. Elliot D. Cohen on the Metaphysics of Logic-Based Therapy
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this essay I consider the question of whether Elliot D. Cohen has justified sufficiently the metaphysical basis for his Logic-Based Therapy as presented in his paper on “The Metaphysics of Logic-Based Therapy (IJPP, this issue). Although Cohen discusses four different foundations of his cognitive theory, I focus only on one. It is the most important basis of his theory, viz., that human beings logically deduce the cognitive-behavior com­ponents of their emotions from premises. First, I question Cohen’s analysis of the emotion rules we use to deduce evaluations of actions from. Second, I challenge Cohen’s view that we deduce our evaluations from emotion rules. Although I do not think my challenges completely undermine Cohen’s theory, they do raise serious concerns for a theory faced with a preponderance of causal therapies.