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Displaying: 101-109 of 109 documents

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101. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 11
Aaron Spevack The Qur’an and God’s Speech According to the Later Ashʿarī-Māturīdī Verifiers
102. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 11
Mehdi Aminrazvi Omar Khayyām on Theodicy: Irreconcilability of the Transcendental and the Imminent
103. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 11
Contributors
104. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 12
Contributors
105. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 12
Abbreviations of Journals and References
106. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 12
Ismail Lala Perceptions of Abraham’s Attempted Sacrifice of Isaac in the Latin Philosophical Tradition, the Sunnī Exegetical Tradition, and by Ibn ʿArabī
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Kierkegaard raises many issues in his account of the near sacri­fice of Isaac by his father. Responding to and critiquing Hegelian and Kantian depictions of Abraham, Kierkegaard moves to elevate Abraham into a position as a knight of faith. The Sunnī perception of the incident in the exegetical tradition is far more ethically unequivocal than that of the Latin philosophical tradi­tion. The ubiquitous Sufi theorist, Ibn ʿArabī, however, in a single act of interpretive ingenuity, managed to extirpate the central root of contention raised by the philosophers when he alleges that Abraham was only ever commanded to sacrifice a ram. Despite his abiding commitment to spiritual unveiling (kashf) and his insistence on the personal nature of God, Ibn ʿArabī advo­cates the employment of a Kantian criterion of universal ratio­nality to adjudicate between literal and metaphorical dreams.
107. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 12
Aaron Spevack Editorial
108. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 12
Kamal Shlbei Ṣadrā on Metaphysical Essentialism: The Unfolding of Existence and the Concealment of Essence
109. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 12
Abdullah bin Hamid Ali Mustafa Akyol’s Reopening Muslim Minds: A Return to Reason, Freedom, and Tolerance