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101. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Sean Byrne, Christopher Cunningham, Eyob Fissuh Getting to Peace: The Role of the European Union Peace 1 Fund in Building the Peace Dividend in Northem Ireland
102. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Peter C. Phan Peacemaking and Reconciliation: Roman Catholic Teachings in the Context of Interreligious Dialogue
103. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Haig Khatchadourian Addressing Root-Causes of Global Terrorism
104. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Notes on Contributors
105. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Geoffrey Karabin The Jewish Social Contract: An Essay in Political Theology
106. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Saul Tobias Affliction, Post-Secularism, and the Plight of Refugees
107. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Ron Large Righteous Resistance: The Religious Roots of Nonviolence in Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Ir.
108. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
John Berteaux Stepping Out of the Brain Drain: Apply Catholic Social Teaching in a New Era of Migration
109. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Lowell S. Gustafson The Other Game: Lessons From How Life Is Played In Mexican Villages
110. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
J. Milburn Thompson Catholic Social Teaching And The Ethics Of Torture
111. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
David Oughton Religions and Peace: Globally And Locally
112. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
George Hunsinger Torture Is The Ticking Time Bomb: Why The Necessity Defense Fails
113. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Matthew Gaudet From The Ashes: Jus Post Bellum And The Emergence Of Kosovo
114. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Carlo Filice Understanding World Religions: A Road Map for Justice and Peace
115. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Notes on Contributors
116. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Gordon Bazemore Getting and Keeping It Real: Less than Perfect Restorative Justice Intervention and the Value of Small Connections
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Despite a wide range of restorative practices in use around the world, most recent research has been focused on one model, family group conferencing. In part due to the salience and appeal of Braithwaite’s reintegrative shaming theory, this important emphasis on the role of structured dialogue with family and intimates privileges an emotional connection that elicits reintegrative shame on the part of the offender, accompanied by group support. In this paper, I argue that reintegrative shaming as practiced in family group conferencing in the youth justice (juvenile justice) context is based on a theory of “strong ties” associated with the extended families of Gemeinschaft societies. This important emphasis on the family/extended family unit as an affective focus, however, may have inadvertently diverted attention from the importance in Gessellschaft societies of “weak ties.” In modernity, such ties provide instrumental support that leads to connections that link offenders and victims to broader “bridging” relationships associated with social and human capital. This paper briefly considers two ostensibly “weak” restorative practices that effectively engage these broader connections for young offenders and families that may be fundamental to reintegration and other prosocial outcomes, while also mobilizing and strengthening the parochial controls and social support of neighbors and other adults. Ultimately, the sustainability of restorative justice will require an openness to practices that accomplish restorative goals, while also facilitating a more flexible, problem solving, and community-building focus.
117. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Howard Zehr The Intersection of Restorative Justice with Trauma Healing, Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding
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Although it originated in criminal justice, restorative justice is essentially a peacebuilding or conflict transformation approach to justice. The crossdisciplinary experience at the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding has suggested some important lessons for restorative justice, peacebuilding and related fields. These include the role of trauma and victimization in justice and peacebuilding; the significance of justice questions in trauma and conflict resolution; the importance of addressing responsibilities as well as needs; the role of shame, storytelling and empathy; the commonality of underlying values; the need for our fields to address underlying issues of bias and structure; and the susceptibility of our fields to unintended consequences. Restorative justice suggests some questions and issues that may be of use to peacebuilding practitioners in general. Above all, it is important for all of us to see ourselves within a larger umbrella of peacebuilding; this will require that we move from competition to collaboration and adopt a common vision of "justpeace."
118. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Editor’s Introduction
119. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Notes on Contributors
120. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Bernard G. Prusak Justice for Children: Autonomy Development and the State