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Displaying: 101-120 of 332 documents

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101. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Steven Schroeder Review of Philosophy of Literature, by Christopher New
102. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Joseph Prabhu Review of Lectures on the History of Moral Philosophy, by John Rawls, ed. Barbara Herman
103. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Alexander Klein Review of Labyrinth: A Search for the Hidden Meaning of Science, by Peter Pesic
104. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Elizabeth Millán-Zaibert Review of The Roots of Romanticism, by Isaiah Berlin
105. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Dennis R. Cooley Review of What We Owe To Each Other, by T.M. Scanlon
106. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
David Boersema Review of Reconsidering Logical Positivism, by Michael Friedman
107. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
David Boersema Introduction: Pragmatism and Neopragmatism
108. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Heidi Salaverria Who is Exaggerating? The Mystery of Common Sense
109. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Hendrik R. Pieterse Neopragmatism and the Christian Desire for a Transcendent God: Is a Meaningful Dialogue Possible?
110. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Charbel Niño El-Hani, Sami Pihlström Emergence Theories and Pragmatic Realism
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The tradition of pragmatism has, especially since Dewey, been characterized by a commitment to nonreductive naturalism. The notion of emergence, popular in the early decades of the twentieth century and currently re-emerging as a central concept in metaphysics and the philosophy of mind, may be useful in explicating that commitment. The present paper discusses the issue of the reality of emergent properties, drawing particular attention to a pragmatic way of approaching this issue. The reality of emergents can be defended as a pragmatically-useful ontological commitment; hence, pragmatism can be employed as a tool in the debate over the structure and reality of emergence. This strategy of justifying ontological commitments is examined through historical and systematic discussions of the pragmatist tradition. It turns out, among other things, that while classical pragmatists did not specify any technical notion of emergence in the contemporary sense, their non-reductively naturalist views are relevant to the more recent emergence discussions -- especially because they rejected the metaphysical realism typical of today’s ontologically-oriented emergence theories.
111. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Gregory M. Fahey The Idea of the Good in John Dewey and Aristotle
112. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Kevin Decker Habermas on Human Rights and Cloning: A Pragmatist Response
113. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Mark McEvoy Naturalized Epistemology, Normativity and the Argument Against the A Priori
114. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Brian E. Butler Legal Pragmatism: Banal or Beneficial as a Jurisprudential Position?
115. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
D. S. Clark Pragmatism’s Instrumental View of Moral Reasoning
116. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Steven Schroeder Review of Kierkegaard After MacIntyre: Essays on Freedom, Narrative, and Virtue, ed. John J. Davenport and Anthony Rudd
117. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Elizabeth Millán-Zaibert Review of Kant Trouble: The Obscurities of the Enlightened, by Diane Morgan
118. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Clancy W. Martin Review of Philosophy and Tragedy, ed. Miguel de Beistegui and Simon Sparks
119. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Leo Zaibert Review of Hannah Arendt in Jerusalem, ed. Steven E. Aschheim
120. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Lawrence Udell Fike Jr. Review of The Sage and the Second Sex: Confucianism, Ethics, and Gender, ed. Chenyang Li