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Displaying: 101-120 of 184 documents

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101. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Stephen Phillips Two Problems about Perception and Mental Intermediaries in the Nyāya Dualism: Focus and "Extraordinary" Sensory Connection with Perceived Properties
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A cognition is a psychological property distinct from the properties of a person's body and objects of sensory experience. A cognition rests or occurs in a self, and for only an instant before giving way to another cognition, each having as content, when veridical, intersubjective objects other than itself. But a cognition is also causally continuous with its objects—in the one direction, through the operation of the sense organs, sight, hearing, and so on, and, in the other, in having a causal role in action undertaken voluntarily. This paper sketches the Nyāya theory of perception with special attention to the arguments of the "New" or late Nyāya philosopher of the fourteenth century, Gangesa, in addressing two thorny areas of the Nyāya picture: (1) focus wanted and unwanted along with apparent cognitive simultaneity in a synthesis of sensory information deriving from the operation of more than one sense organ, and (2) the peculiar sensory connection involved in perception of future instances of universals, illusorty perception, and in recognition of someone or something that one has encountered before.
102. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Isaac Nevo Theories of Learning and Public Languages: Davidson's Program Reconsidered
103. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
J. Randall Groves Buddhism and Abortion
104. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Kisor K. Chakrabarti AAtmatattvaviveka (Analysis of the Nature of the Self) An Annotated Translation: The Argument from Auxiliary Causal Conditions
105. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Carl Olson The Problematic and Liberating Nature of Language in the Philosophies of Derrida and Śaṅkara
106. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Gregory P. Fields Liberation as Healing in Classical Yoga
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Classical or Patañjala Yoga diagnoses die human conditon as state of suffering caused by ignorance whose specific form is misidentification of self with psychophysical nature. This paper argues that liberation in Yoga is healing in an ultimate sense, i.e., attainment of well-being with respect to the person's fundamental nature and soteriological potential. Vyāsa's Yogabhasya presents the yogic remedy in terms of a medical model, and this paper excavates the therapeutic paradigm of the Yogasūtras using concept of health distilled from the Āyurvedic medical text Caraka-saṁhitā. Determinants of health according to Āyurveda include wholeness, self-identit), and freedom, and these concepts are utilized to ground the claim that in classical Yoga, liberation is healing: curing the dysfunction and consequent suffering of one's psychophysical self, which is coextensive with realization of one's true Self as consciousness.
107. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Jai N. Misir Ralph Waldo Emerson: Kṛṣṇa Lays Upon Arjuna the Necessity of Fighting
108. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 5
Peter Della Santina The Sākāra—Nirākāravāda Controversy
109. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 6
Ellen Goldberg The Haṭhayogapradīpikā of Svātmārāma and the Rahasyabodhinī of Kṛpalvānanda
110. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 6
Klaus G. Witz Toward a Subjective Psychology Inspired by the Upanishadic Notion of Atman
111. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 6
Maria Marczewska-Rytko Science and Religion at the Threshold of a New Millennium
112. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 6
Kisor K. Chakrabarti AAtmatattvaviveka (Analysis of the Nature of the Self) An Annotated Translation: Reductio Arguments
113. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 6
Kenneth Holmqvist, Jaroslaw Pluciennik The Hebraic and the Indian Sublime from the Rhetoric Point of View
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In Hegel's 'Aesthetics', one can find a strong distinction between the Hebraic, true sublimity and the Indian, positive sublime. The main thesis of our article is that, from the rhetorical and cognitive point of view, the two sublimities do not form an opposition, although from the theological point of view they do. In order to affirm the thesis, we briefly analyze the main figures of the sublime as presented in Pseudo-Longinos' 'On the Sublime' and the concept of the sublime in Kant. According to our theory of the sublime, the Lyotardian formula of the sublime as 'presenting the unpresentable' should be expressed as 'representing the unimaginable'. When we examine the main examples of the Hebraic and the Indian sublime, we can easily see that in both literary cultures we can find a strong mimetic element as well as antimimetic evocation of the unimaginable. We identify the mimetic element in the sublime texts not only with space seen in accord with Kant but also with 'mimesis of emotion' which is regarded as the main form of mimesis in the ancient Greek tradition, for instance in Plato.
114. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 6
Jonathan C. Kramer The Subjective Experience of Time in Dhrupad, a Genre of North Indian Classical Music
115. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 6
Majid Amini Religious Discourse and Identity
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There is a widespread assumption that ethnic origins substantially contribute, if not constitute, the identity of individuals. In particular, among the ethnic elements, il is claimed that religion takes precedence and people could be individuated in terms of their religious affiliations. The purpose of this paper, however, is to show that strictly speaking identity cannot be constituted by religion. More precisely, it is argued that a phenomenological characterisation of individual identity fails to do justice to the philosophical requirements of identity. The argument is obviously philosophical by nature and is developed through an analysis of the concept of revelation. The phenomenon of revelation plays a pivotal role in the Judaic-Christian-Islamic tradition, yet by its very nature owes its authenticity to something prior to itself, namely, reason. This entails the priority of reason over revelation and as such undermines claims that purport to define identity in terms of revelation/religion. This detachment of identity from religion would clearly have far-reaching socio-political imphcations for issues such as diversity, pluralism and globahsation.
116. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 7
Antonio Palomo-Lamarca, Stephen Palmquist Kant, Buddhism and the Moral Metaphysics Medicine
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This paper examines Kant's moral theory and compares it with certain key aspects of oriental (especially Buddhist) moral philosophy. In both cases, we focus on the suggestion that there may be a connection between a person's physical health and moral state. Special attention is paid to the nature of pain, illness, and personal happiness and to their mutual interrelationships.
117. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 7
Alison R. Marshall Xie Lingyun's Reflections on the 'Appreciative Heart'
118. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 7
Scott R. Stroud Multivalent Narratives and Indian Philosophical Argument: Insights from the Bhagavad Gita
119. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 7
Don A. Habibi Moral Thought vs. Imperialist Reality: J.S. Mill and India
120. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 7
Kisor K. Chakrabarti AAtmatattvaviveka (Analysis of the Nature of the Self) An Annotated Translation: The Argument from Opposedness