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101. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Germain Grisez Bioethics and Christian Anthropology
102. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Albert S. Moraczewksi, O.P. The Clash of Values in Institutional Alliances
103. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Carol N. Hogan Can the Government Define Religion?
104. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Daniel P. Sulmasy, O.F.M. Catholic Health Care: Not Dead Yet
105. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Journals in Philosophy and Theology
106. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Margaret John Kelly, D.C. Catholic Ethics in Catholic Health Care Systems
107. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Colloquy
108. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 1
Richard S. Myers On the Need for a Federal Conscience Clause
109. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco Science
110. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Michael J. Miller Defending Life: A Moral and Legal Case against Abortion Choice by Francis J. Beckwith
111. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Allison LeDoux Emergency Contraception: Can It Be Morally Justified?
112. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Robert Scott Smith, M.D., Bryan A. Piras, Carr J. Smith The Bioethics of Gene Therapy
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Gene therapy is the modification of the human genetic code to prevent disease or cure illness. This technology is in its infancy and remains confined to experimental clinical trials. Once the present barriers are overcome, gene therapy will confront humanity with a host of ethical challenges. Therapies targeted to the genes of germ-line cells will introduce permanent changes to the human gene pool. Furthermore, nonmedical gene modifications have the potential to introduce a new form of eugenics into our society by which some members attempt to become inherently superior to others and humanity is re-engineered to man-made specifications. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10.1 (Spring 2010): 45–50.
113. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Books Received
114. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Richard M. Doerflinger Washington Insider
115. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Edward J. Furton Selective Citations
116. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Colloquy
117. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Edward J. Furton, M.A., Ph.D. In This Issue
118. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Philip Blosser Retrieving the Natural Law: A Return to Moral First Things by J. Daryl Charles
119. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Rev. Benedict M. Guevin, O.S.B. Reproductive Technologies in Light of Dignitas personae
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The purpose of the Instruction Dignitas personae, issued by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, is not only to reaffirm the validity of the teaching laid out in Donum vitae (1987), with regard to both the principles on which it is based and the moral evaluations which it expresses, but to add needed clarification on reproductive technologies in the light of more recent developments. In addition to the reproductive technologies discussed in Dignitas personae, namely, homologous and heterologous artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection, the author also discusses other reproductive technologies, not covered by the Instruction, such as gamete intrafallopian transfer, zygote intrafallopian transfer, tubal embryo transfer, and pronuclear-stage embryo transfer. After analyzing each of these the author offers a general ethical evaluation. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10.1 (Spring 2010): 51–59.
120. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Vital Conflicts in Medical Ethics: A Virtue Approach to Craniotomy and Tubal Pregnancies by Martin Rhonheimer