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121. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Andrew M. Essig Geoffrey Shaw, The Lost Mandate of Heaven: The American Betrayal of Ngo Dinh Diem, President of Vietnam
122. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Stephen Sharkey Pierpaolo Donati and Paul Sullins, The Conjugal Family: An Irreplaceable Resource for Society
123. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Stephen M. Krason Paul Kengor, Takedown: From Communists to Progressives, How the Left Has Sabotaged Family and Marriage
124. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Ernest A. Greco Mark Riebling, Church of Spies
125. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 21
Michael J. Ruszala Rev. Brian Mullady, OP, Christian Social Order
126. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Kieran Flanagan Postsecularism: Another Sociological Mirage?
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This review essay reflects on two works that pertain to the postsecular: Josef Bengtson, Explorations in Post-Secular Metaphysics (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016); and Florian Zemmin, Colin Jager, Guido Vanheeswijck, eds., Working with a Secular Age: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Charles Taylor’s Master Narrative (Berlin: de Gruyter, 2016). The profound influence of Charles Taylor's A Secular Age (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2007) is well illustrated in these two works under review. The review essay situates postsecularity in the context of debates on secularization and the sociological expectations this process generates. By treating postsecularism in terms of contextualisation, metaphysics arises as a default position pertaining to transcendence in Bengtson’s work. The efforts in the Zemmin, Jager, and Vanheeswijck work to steer the Taylor work in the direction of Islam are given a critical appraisal. A particular outcome of postsecularity is to render as untenable sociology’s customary detachment of religion from theology. Lastly, for Catholicism, postsecularism draws attention to a long-standing and long-denied crisis in the reproduction of belief in modernity and in a secularized Europe in particular. A singular exception to this crisis occurs in Scandinavian countries, notable for their absence of religion, which are experiencing a small, but significant renaissance of Catholicism. This opens out a positive side to debates on postsecularity which indicates that it is not solely about mirages which give comfort to secularized forms of sociology.
127. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Ronald J. Rychlak András Fejérdy, editor, The Vatican “Ostpolitik” 1958–1978: Responsibility and Witness during John XXIII and Paul VI
128. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Garrick Small Donald Boland, Economic Science and St. Thomas Aquinas: On Justice in the Distribution and Exchange of Wealth; E. Michael Jones, Barren Metal: A History of Capitalism as the Conflict Between Labor and Usury.
129. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Kevin Schmiesing Thomas C. Leonard, Illiberal Reformers: Race, Eugenics, and American Economics in the Progressive Era
130. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
J. Marianne Siegmund Colin Patterson, Chalcedonian Personalsim: Rethinking the Human
131. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Ryan J. Barilleaux James Hitchcock, Abortion, Religious Freedom, and Catholic Politics
132. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Kieran Flanagan Ivan Oliver, A Road to Rome: Walking in the Foothills of Catholicism
133. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
David M. Klocek Yuval Levin, The Fractured Republic: Renewing America’s Social Contract in the Age of Individualism
134. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Laurence Reardon Bruce P. Frohnen and George W. Carey, Constitutional Morality and the Rise of Quasi-Law
135. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Benjamin J. Brown Angus Sibley, Catholic Economics: Alternatives to the Jungle
136. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Bruce Frohnen Ronald J. Rychlak, editor, American Law from a Catholic Perspective: Through a Clearer Lens
137. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Richard S. Myers John P. Safranek, The Myth of Liberalism
138. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 3
Brian W. Harrison In the Murky Waters of Vatican II
139. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 3
Connaught Marshner The Framework of a Christian State
140. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 3
George P. Graham Witness for the Truth: The Wanderer's One Hundred Thirty Year Adventure in Catholic Journalism