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Displaying: 141-160 of 173 documents

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141. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 6/7 > Issue: 3/4/1/2
Alphonso Lingis Divine Illusions
142. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 6/7 > Issue: 3/4/1/2
Roger Berkowitz Friedrich Nietzsche, The Code of Manu, and the Art of Legislation
143. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 6/7 > Issue: 3/4/1/2
Babette E. Babich Reading David B. Allison
144. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 6/7 > Issue: 3/4/1/2
Gary Shapiro Friends and Readers
145. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 6/7 > Issue: 3/4/1/2
Cynthia D. Coe, Matthew C. Altman The Paradoxes of Convalescent History
146. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 6/7 > Issue: 3/4/1/2
David B. Allison Who is Zarathustra’s Nietzsche?
147. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 6/7 > Issue: 3/4/1/2
Thomas Paul Bonfiglio Toward a Genealogy of Aryan Morality: Nietzsche and Jacolliot
148. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 6/7 > Issue: 3/4/1/2
Duncan Large Wolf Man, Overman: “Nachträglichkeit” in Freud and Nietzsche in Zarathustra
149. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 6/7 > Issue: 3/4/1/2
Larry Hatab On Nietzsche, Politics, and Time: A Response to William E. Connolly and Tracy B. Strong
150. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 6/7 > Issue: 3/4/1/2
Tracy B. Strong Politics, and Time: The Overcoming of the Past
151. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 6/7 > Issue: 3/4/1/2
Günther Wohlfart Who is Nietzsche’s Zarathustra?
152. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3/4
K. E. Gover The Gift of Debt: On Heidegger’s Misreading of Nietzsche
153. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3/4
Erik S. Reinert, Hugo Reinert Creative Destruction in Economics
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This paper argues that the idea of creative destruction enters the social sciences by way of Friedrich Nietzsche. The term itself is first used by German economist Werner Sombart, who openly acknowledges the influence of Nietzsche on his own economic theory. The roots of creative destruction are traced back to Indian philosophy, from where the idea entered the German literary and philosophical tradition. Understanding the origins and evolution of this key concept in evolutionary economics helps clarifying the contrasts between today’s standard mainstream economics and the Schumpeterian and evolutionary alternative.
154. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3/4
Greg Canning Mann Contra Nietzsche
155. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3/4
Joseph Ward The ‘Great Triumph over Christianity’: Nietzsche on Love and Marriage
156. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3/4
Charles Scott The Force of Life and Faith: Nietzsche/Kierkegaard
157. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3/4
Babette Babich Lou and Sacro Monte
158. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3/4
Roberto Borghesi “Ecce Homo” — Ecce Parodia
159. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3/4
Peter Bornedal Women and Seduction in Kierkegaard and Nietzsche
160. New Nietzsche Studies: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3/4
Bill Martin Gary Shapiro and the Nietzschean Current After 1968