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161. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
The National Catholic Bioethics Center Employed Health Care Providers and the Provision of Direct Contraception
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This March 2018 document replaces an earlier template policy, “Model Clinical Practice Ethics Guidelines for Affiliated Health Care Professionals with Respect to Prescription of Contraceptives,” drafted by The National Catholic Bioethics Center in the 1990s. Instead of a template policy, the new document provides definitions and principles to help health care institutions apply Catholic moral teachings if, for whatever reason, they happen to employ providers who prescribe contraception. The three basic principles are (1) distinguishing responsible agents and maintaining organizational integrity, (2) avoiding immoral cooperation, and (3) avoiding and resolving theological scandal.
162. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
Carter Anne McGowan Conscience Rights and “Effective Referral” in Ontario
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In 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada decriminalized euthanasia. Soon after, the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario enacted the Professional Obligations and Human Rights policy and the Medical Assistance in Dying policy. Neither these policies nor the Medical Assistance in Dying Act, the Ontario law permitting euthanasia, contains a conscientious objection clause. Instead, the policies require objecting doctors to provide an effective referral to a doctor who will euthanize the patient. Objecting physicians brought suit against the college. In a recent decision, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice held against the plaintiffs, finding the infringement of the effective referral policy on physicians’ rights to conscience and religious freedom to be appropriate when balanced against a patient’s right to equitable access to health care. Therefore, Catholic physicians in Ontario now must choose to violate either their religious beliefs or their professional obligations. It is imperative that these policies be struck down on appeal, superseded by an amendment, or revised by the college through the addition of a conscience clause.
163. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
James Beauregard Advancing a Personalist Neuroethics
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Neuroethics is a new and rapidly expanding field in the academy and clinical practice. However, there is no comprehensive treatment of it from a specifically Catholic perspective. Nevertheless, the Catholic tradition contains possible criteria for a systematic approach to neuroethics. The personalist philosophical tradition, specifically modern ontological personalism, provides a framework for organizing and articulating those aspects of personhood that are most relevant to neuroscience and neuroethics
164. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
William F. Sullivan, John Heng, Christopher De Bono, Gerry Gleeson, Gill Goulding Healing Relationships and Transformations in Health Care: IACB Consensus Statement on Ethical Discernment and Practical Recommendations
165. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
Richard A. Spinello Bioethics and the Human Soul: Pope St. John Paul II’s Reflections on Ensoulment
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Pope St. John Paul II’s work on the Theology of the Body is well known among his many followers. Less well known is his conception of the human soul. Karol Wojtyla’s intricate philosophy of the soul fully endorses Aristotelian Thomistic psychology. Wojtyla’s main contribution is a phenomenological description of human action, which provides a credible basis for inferring the soul’s necessity. In the papal writings, John Paul II develops other resourceful doctrines, especially about the timing of ensoulment. His unelaborated notion of the genealogy of the person has implications for ethics. Following in the tradition of St. Thomas Aquinas, John Paul II presents an integrated wisdom about the soul that weaves together Christian revelation, modern science, and different modes of philosophical reflection.
166. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
David A. Prentice Science
167. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
Jay Bringman Medicine
168. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
Christopher Kaczor Philosophy and Theology
169. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
Joseph Meaney The Heart and the Abyss: Preventing Abortion
170. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
J. Brian Benestad Keeping Faith with Human Rights
171. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
Ryan Connors Complicity and Moral Accountability
172. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
Brian Welter The Nature of the Human Soul: Philosophical Anthropology and Moral Theology
173. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
Mark S. Latkovic Before Virtue: Assessing Contemporary Virtue Ethics
174. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 2
Vince A. Punzo Catholic Witness in Health Care: Practicing Medicine in Truth and Love
175. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Edward J. Furton In This Issue
176. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Greg Schleppenbach Washington Insider
177. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Peter J. Colosi Discussing the Spiritual Soul in the Classroom
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There is a pedagogical method of bringing undergraduate students to conceive the body–soul question. Similarly, there is a simple philosophical argument in defense of the existence of the soul via contemporary autobiographical stories, recent neuroscientific literature, and Socrates’s distinction between condition and cause in Plato’s Phaedo. This method has proved helpful in enabling students to gain access to the mystery and grandeur of the body–soul question and its foundational importance with respect to ethics and, indeed, to the meaning of life. There must be a revival of collaboration between neuroscientists and philosophers to coauthor papers that explicitly challenge the materialist assumptions in the fields of neuroscience and psychology.
178. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Elliott Louis Bedford Colloquy
179. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Joshua Evans The Mother’s Child as Aggressor: A Further Reply to Charles Camosy
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In a short section of his 2015 book Beyond the Abortion Wars, Charles Camosy claims that direct abortion to save the life of the mother is consistent with Catholic principles. Joshua Evans published an essay critical of this view in the Summer 2017 issue of the National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly, to which Camosy responded in the Summer 2018 issue. In the current essay, Evans replies to Camosy’s recent response by offering a further examination of three central issues in dispute: (1) how the history of moral theology bears on public debates, (2) how past authoritative Church teaching applies when the method of moral theology apparently has shifted, and (3) how the analysis of vital conflicts is affected when examined in relation to more fundamental theological considerations.
180. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Divya Joshi, Dwight Stapleton The Influence of Spiritual Retreats on Compassion in Health Care
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Our moral compass is not the only thing that compels us to provide compassionate health care, which also improves patient outcomes and patient and provider satisfaction. In the current era of increasing medical complexity, provider burnout, and value-based reimbursement, health care systems struggle to durably improve their providers’ compassion in the provision of care. A religious retreat curriculum for leaders at OSF HealthCare, in Illinois and Michigan, has led to a significant, long-term increase among employees in their compassion toward patients, colleagues, and self.