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161. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Erik Gravel, Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco Design and Destiny: Jewish and Christian Perspectives on Human Germline Modification edited by Ronald Cole-Turner
162. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Journals in Medicine
163. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Ashley Fernandes, MD The Loss of Dignity at the End of Life: Incommunicability as a Call and a Demand
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The permissibility of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide is actively debated worldwide. Writers such as Ruth Macklin and Steven Pinker have argued that dignity is not a useful concept in bioethics and cannot be used legitimately by either side in the debate. In this essay, the author expands on a defense of the human person based in dignity and rooted in the work of Karol Wojtyla (Pope John Paul II) and Gabriel Marcel. He defends the idea, introduced by John F. Crosby, that a human person has dignity because of her “unrepeatableness,” a concept known as incommunicability. The author argues that the concept of dignity—far from being abstract, useless, or dangerous, as some writers have recently claimed—is a practical and vital protection for persons. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10.3 (Autumn 2010): 529–546.
164. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Journals in Philosophy and Theology
165. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Caring for and Giving Hope to Persons with Progressive Cognitive Impairments
166. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Timothy P. Collins, MD Is Gardasil Good Medicine?
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The HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine Gardasil (Merck & Co.) was licensed for use by the FDA on June 8, 2006. The Centers for Disease Control and major physician professional organizations have recommended routine universal vaccination in young girls. However, questions remain regarding the safety and efficacy of the vaccine in this age group. Also, vaccine use will not eliminate the need for routine Pap screening, and it may not decrease future cervical cancer rates. This paper surveys the natural history of HPV infection as well as the controversies surrounding the vaccine’s use as currently recommended. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10.3 (Autumn 2010): 459–469.
167. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Francis L. Delmonico, MD The Concept of Death and Deceased Organ Donation
168. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Rev. Benedict M. Guevin, OSB Vital Conflicts and Virtue Ethics
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In his book Vital Conflicts in Medical Ethics: A Virtue Approach to Craniotomy and Tubal Pregnancies, Martin Rhonheimer offers a virtue approach to vital conflicts in medical ethics. These vital conflicts are those medical situations involving pregnancy in which, if nothing is done, both the mother and her child will die. When analyzed by means of his understanding of the virtue of justice, Rhonheimer concludes that the so-called direct killing of children in the womb or in the fallopian tube is permissible since the child’s death is neither a means to saving the mother’s life nor an end sought for itself and is, therefore, not unjust. Because such a death is not unjust, it is also not a moral evil since only an unjust death can be called a moral evil. The author offers a critique of both his understanding of justice and what constitutes the “object” of the moral act. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10.3 (Autumn 2010): 471–480.
169. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Edward J. Furton, MA, PhD In This Issue
170. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Colloquy
171. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco Science
172. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
C. Clark Hodgson Jr. On Law and Chastity by Robert E. Rodes Jr.
173. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
William E. May An Introduction to Bioethics, fourth edition by Thomas A. Shannon and Nicholas J. Kockler
174. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Marie T. Hilliard, RN Military Medical Ethics: Issues Involving Dual Loyalties reported by Neil E. Weisfeld, Victoria D. Weisfeld, and Catharyn T. Liverman
175. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 3
Michael E. Allsopp Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths about Science and Religion edited by Ronald L. Numbers
176. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Thank You
177. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Rev. Grzegorz Holub, SDB Creating Better People?: Some Considerations on Genetic Enhancement
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Genetic engineering promises to change the human condition by changing certain human characteristics. Why not take control of such changes and secure positive outcomes, making use of our progressing knowledge about human genetic make-up and our increasingly sophisticated skills? This paper elaborates the meanings of the word “change,” a cornerstone of the enhancement debate, focusing not on technicalities of genetic engineering but on philosophical implications of its implementation. The paper then turns to some of the complexities and difficulties of the debate. Finally, it takes up a strictly philosophical investigation of what we mean by “change” as far as a basic structure of the human being (the human person) is concerned, and examines what conclusions can be drawn for genetic enhancement. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10.4 (Winter 2010): 723–740.
178. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Rev. Deacon Thomas J. Davis Jr. Plan B Agonistics: Doubt, Debate, and Denial
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Researches over many years have examined whether levonorgestrel emergency contraception (Plan B, Next Choice) has a postfertilization effect. In a recent article in the Catholic Health Association’s journal Health Progress, Sandra Reznik, MD, asserts that “levonorgestrel acts to prevent pregnancy before, and only before, fertilization occurs.” A companion article by Ron Hamel, PhD, argues for the moral certainty that Plan B is not an abortifacient. Reznik fails to address the principal model supporting a potential postfertil­ization mechanism of action, specifically, that preovulatory administration of levonorgestrel disrupts the delicate ratio of estrogen and progesterone essential to healthy endometrial development and induces the equivalent of luteal phase insufficiency, thereby jeopardizing implantation. Hamel’s argument for moral certitude is similarly inadequate. This article critically reviews both articles and the sources on which they rely. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10.4 (Winter 2010): 741–772.
179. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
The Most Reverend Mark J. Seitz Check Your Faith at the Door: The Dilemma of the Catholic Citizen
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Since America was founded, faith informed its moral genius. From the Declaration of Independence to the work of Martin Luther King Jr., belief in God positively shaped the moral awareness of the nation. This article suggests that political discourse emerging in the middle of the twentieth century, which effectively prohibits the mention of faith in serious political conversation, is having devastating consequences on the moral capacity of contemporary society. It suggests that such faith-less political discourse contradicts America’s founding logic. This article also reasserts the Catholic claim that truth can be known and that in the face of faith-less political discourse, Catholics are morally bound to seek complete truth, which requires faith. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10.4 (Winter 2010): 687–693.
180. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Index to Volume 10