Displaying: 181-200 of 731 documents

0.072 sec

181. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Libros recibidos / Books Received
182. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Boletín de suscripción / Order Form
183. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 16 > Issue: 3
Peter Machamer, Franccsca Di Poppa Rational Reconstructions Revised
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Imre Lakatos’ idea that history of science without philosophy of science is blind may still be given a plausible interpretation today, even though his theory of the methodology of scientific research programmes has been rejected. The latter theory captures neither rationality in science nor the sense in which history must be told in a rational fashion. Nonetheless, Lakatos was right in insisting that the discipline of history consists of written rational reconstructions. In this paper, we will examine possible ways to cash out different, philosophically interesting, relationships: between rationality and science, between rationality and philosophy of science and/or epistemology, and, of course, between history and philosophy of science. Our conclusion is that the historian of science may be a philosopher of science as weIl, but if that philosophy of science is essentially a historical and dogmatic, it either cannot be used for history or it will deprive history of some of its most interesting and useful categories.
184. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Friedrich Steinle Challenging Established Concepts: Ampère and Exploratory Experimentation
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
The more unknowns there are and the newer a field of research is, the less well defined are the experiments. Once a field has been sufficiently worked over so that the possible conclusions are more or less limited to existence or nonexistence, and perhaps to quantitative determination, the experiments will become increasingly better defined. But they will no longer be independent, because they are carried along by a system of earlier experiments and decisions, which is generally the situation in physics and chemistry today. Such a system will then become self-evident know-how itself. We will no longer be aware of its application and effect (Fleck 1935 (1980), p. 114, translation slightly altered from Fleck 1979, p. 86, original emphasis).
185. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Valeriano Iranzo Constructive Empiricism and Scientific Practice. A Case Study
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
According to van Fraassen, constructive empiricism (CE) makes better sense of scientific activity than scientific realism (SR). I discuss a recent episode in biomedical research - investigations about Helicobacter Pylori and its relation to peptic ulcer. CE's expedient to cope with it is a sort of belief substitution. I argue that replacing realist beliefs by empiricist surrogates (as-if beliefs) could accommodate scientists' expectations and behavior. Nonetheless, theoretical agnosticism could hardly motivate scientists to focus just on the observational consequences derived from the theory at issue. Contrary to van Fraassen, I conclude then that, concerning scientific practice, realist beliefs cannot be considered as a gratuitious surplus which should be rejected.
186. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Diana I. Perez Physicalism, Qualia and Mental Concepts
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this paper I shall carefully examine some recent arguments for dualism. These arguments presuppose a strong version of physicalism that I consider inappropriate. I shall try to show that, if we reformulate the thesis of physicalism according to Kim's view of physicalism (in terms of the supervenience relation), there is a third option, a version of type physicalism, where physicalism and quaiia could be conciliated. In order to sketch this option, I shall consider the main argument against type physicalism: the explanatory gap argument, and two arguments that Kim mentions against physicalism: the inverted spectrum / zombies argument and the intrinsicality argument. I shall try to show that these three arguments depend upon a misconception of the nature of our ordinary mental concepts.
187. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Agenda / Notebook
188. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Agustín Vicente The Localism of the Conserved Quantity Theory
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Phil Dowe has argued persuasively for a reductivist theory of causality. Drawing on Wesley Salmon's mark transmission theory and David Fair's transferencetheory, Dowe proposes to reduce causality to the exchange of conserved quantities. Dowe's account has the virtue of being simple and offering a definite "visible" idea of causation. According to Dowe and Salmon, it is also virtuous in being localist. That a theory of causation is localist means that it does not need the aid of counterfactuals and/or laws to work. Moreover, it can become the means by which we explain counterfactuals and laws. In this paper, I will argue that the theory is not localist (and hence, that it is less simple than it seems). As far as I can see, the theory needs the aid of laws.
189. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Agenda / Notebook
190. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
SUMARIO ANALITICO / SUMMARY
191. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Gheorghe Paun, Mario J. Pérez-Jiménez Recent Computability Models Inspired from Biology: DNA and Membrane Computing
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
We briefly present two areas of natural computing, vividly investigated in the recent years: DNA computing and membrane computing. Both of them have the roots in cellular biology and are rather developedat the theoretical level (new concepts, models, paradigms of computer science, with mathematical and epistemological significance have been considered in this framework), but both areas are still looking for implementations of a practical interest.
192. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
LIBROS RECIBIDOS / BOOKS RECEIVED
193. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Patrick Blackburn, Johan Bos Computational Semantics
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this article we discuss what constitutes a good choice of semantic representation, compare different approaches of constructing semantic representations for fragments of natural language, and give an overview of recent methods for employing inference engines for natural language understanding tasks.
194. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
AGENDA / NOTEBOOK
195. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Joerg Flum Descriptive Complexity Theories
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this article we review some of the main results of descriptive complexity theory in order to make the reader familiar with the nature of the investigations in this area. We start by presenting the characterization of automata recognizable languages by monadic second-order logic. Afterwards we explain the characterization of various logics by fIxed-point logics. We assume familiarity with logic but try to keep knowledge of complexity theory to aminimum.
196. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Juan José Acero Conceptions of the mind... that do not loose sight of logic
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Which is the relation between logic and philosophy of mind? This work tries to answer that question by shortly examining, first, the place that is assigned to logic in three current views of the mind: Computationalism, Interpretativism and Naive Naturalism. Secondly, the classical debate between psychologism and antipsychologism is reviewed -the question about whether logic is or not a part of psychology- and it is indicated in which place of such debate the three mentioned conceptions of mind are located.
197. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Informantes de THEORIA (2000-2002) / Reviewers for 2000-2002
198. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Carlos Martín-Vide, Victor Mitrana Networks of Evolutionary Processors: A Survey
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
The goal of this paper is to survey, in a uniform and systematic way, the main results regarding networks of evolutionary processors reported so far. First, we recall the results concerning the computational power of these networks viewed as language generating devices. Then, we briefly present a few NP-complete problems and recall how they were solved in linear time by networks of evolutionary processors with linearly bounded resources (nodes, ruIes, symbols).
199. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Ángel Nepomuceno Presentation: The interdisciplinary field of Logic, Language and Information
200. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Andoni Ibarra Editor’s Note