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181. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Rev. Kevin D. O’Rourke, OP Catholic Principles and In Vitro Fertilization
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In the 2008 Instruction Dignitas personae (The Dignity of the Person), the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith presented once again the teaching of the Church on in vitro fertilization. Much of this teaching was contained in the earlier Instruction Donum vitae (The Gift of Life, 1987), but the new document brings the teaching of the Church up to date. Because the teaching is not accepted in the secular scientific community and is often unknown in the Catholic community, this article explores the process of IVF, the view of the Church concerning it, and the fundamental principles underlying the Church’s teaching. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10.4 (Winter 2010): 709–722.
182. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Rev. Linus Dolce, OSB Injustice Perpetrated on the Dead: A Christian Perspective on Body Worlds
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At a Body Worlds exhibition, human corpses are displayed as museum pieces for educational purposes. The bodies are preserved by plastination, a technique invented by Gunther von Hagens and engineered at the Institute for Plastination in Heidelberg, Germany. Because of the wide controversy surrounding the displays, it is necessary to study how justice obtains. Understood from a Thomistic perspective, the use of a plastinate by Body Worlds is unjust because it dishonors the donor. The goodness of that use fails in terms of object, end, and circumstance. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10.4 (Winter 2010): 667–676.
183. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Stan Dundon Denying Food and Water: The Real-World Implications
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Life-support technology may become a death-prolonging horror, and some people may fear that an over-intellectualized interpretation of traditional moral teaching has led us astray from what a compassionate God wills for the dying. The author addresses this fear. Those who defend “orthodox” teaching on end-of-life issues have a serious obligation not to obscure the compassion implicit in the traditional distinction between ordinary and extraordinary means. There is no medical or moral obligation to prolong dying or make it more burdensome with interventions that offer little benefit, and there is nothing immoral about pain relief. What is prohibited is killing: any action or omission that has the express or implicit purpose of ending a life. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10.4 (Winter 2010): 695–705.
184. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco Science
185. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Christopher D. Hare At the Original Position as a Fetus: Rawlsian Political Theory and Catholic Bioethics
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The approach of liberal political philosopher John Rawls on the issue of abortion relied on his construct of “public reason,” in which citizens in a pluralistic democracy restrict the use of deliberative arguments and reasons that are drawn from their “irreconcilable comprehensive doctrines,” including their religious worldviews. From this reasoning, Rawls concludes that a just society is one that includes the legal right to abortion. However, the author contends that the use of another of Rawls’s theories—“justice as fairness”—leads to an alternative conclusion: that legally sanctioned abortion represents the unjust persecution of a specific population—the unborn. Further, this same theoretical approach supports the egalitarian application of Catholic social thought to protect the fetus as a uniquely vulnerable position in society. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10.4 (Winter 2010): 677–686.
186. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
William L. Saunders Jr. Washington Insider
187. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Colloquy
188. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
John M. Travaline, MD, FACP Medicine
189. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Daniel P. Maher Biotechnology: Our Future as Human Beings and Citizens edited by Sean D. Sutton
190. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Rev. Richard Umbers Virtue Epistemology: Motivation and Knowledge by Stephen Napier
191. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Rev. David N. Beauregard, OMV A History of Catholic Moral Theology in the Twentieth Century: From Confessing Sins to Liberating Consciences by James F. Keenan, SJ
192. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Michael E. Allsopp The Case against Assisted Suicide: For the Right to End-of-Life Care edited by Kathleen Foley and Herbert Hendin and The Future of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia by Neil M. Gorsuch
193. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Br. Ezra Sullivan, OP Good and Evil Actions: A Journey through Saint Thomas Aquinas by Steven J. Jensen
194. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Journals in Medicine
195. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Journals in Science
196. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Journals in Philosophy and Theology
197. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Christopher Kaczor, PhD Philosophy and Theology
198. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 10 > Issue: 4
Edward J. Furton, MA, PhD In This Issue
199. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Lawrence Masek The Contralife Argument andthe Principle of Double Effect
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The author uses the central insight of the principle of double effect—that the distinction between intended effects and foreseen side effects is morally significant—to distinguish contraception from natural family planning (NFP). After summarizing the contralife argument against contraception, the author identifies limitations of arguments presented by Pope John Paul II and by Martin Rhonheimer. To show that the contralife argument does not apply to NFP, the author argues that agents do not intend every effect that motivates their actions. This argument supplements the action theory of Germain Grisez, Joseph Boyle, John Finnis, and other proponents of new natural law theory. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 11.1 (Spring 2011): 83–97.
200. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Michael E. Allsopp The Doctrine of Double Effect in U.S. Law: Exploring Neil Gorsuch’s Analyses
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The doctrine of double effect has a firm, respected position within Roman Catholic medical ethics. Neil M. Gorsuch, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, believes that this doctrine also enjoys a central place within U.S. law. This essay examines and assesses Gorsuch’s thesis. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 11.1 (Spring 2011): 31–40.