Narrow search


By category:

By publication type:

By language:

By journals:

By document type:


Displaying: 21-40 of 110 documents

0.106 sec

21. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Ben Mijuskovic Theories of Consciousness, Therapy, and Loneliness
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
The article offers a brief set of definitions of metaphysical and epistemological principles underlying three distinct theories of consciousness and then relates these paradigms to a triad of contemporary therapeutic modalities. Accordingly, it connects materialism, empiricism, determinism and a passive interpretation of the “mind”=brain to medication interventions and behavioral and cognitive treatments. In this context, the paper proceeds to argue that these treatment approaches are theoretically incapable of addressing the dominant issue of man’s loneliness, and his struggle to escape from it, as the most basic universal drivein human beings. Next, it discusses the dualist, idealist, and rationalist assumptions of an active reflexive, self-consciousness, which has dominated insight-oriented treatment methodologies since Freud. And, finally, it treats the Hesperian and Sartre an phenomenological andexistential descriptions of awareness as grounded in the transcen­dent principle of intentionality emphasizing the aspects of the freedom of consciousness. Lastly, it claims that the first view stresses the temporal present; the second the past; and the third the future.
22. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Antony R. White, Tarrell Awe Agahe Portman Aligning Existentialism with Developmental Supervision: Embracing the Psychological Instant
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Despite the readily available discussion on counseling supervision models for over a quarter of a century, there is little attention in the literature with respect to how developmental supervision models align with existential philosophy. One model, The Integrated Developmental Model (IDM), is a robust and well-accepted model of supervision with embedded undertones of existentialism requiring scholarly discussion. The primary goal of this article is to emphasize the parallels between the IDM and Sartre’s philosophical principles of existentialism thereby creating a meaning making framework for supervisors to enhance developmental growth of their supervisees.
23. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Elliot D. Cohen Editor’s Preface
24. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Ching-Tzu Chen A Counselee Who Questions Her Mother’s Authority
25. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Yu-Chih Kao A Caregiver’s Problem
26. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Emily Chao A Wife’s Anxiety About Her Perceived Duty to Her Husband
27. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Yen-Shan Ho A Counselee’s Relationship with his Mother
28. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Jing Jei You Confronting Death & Dying with An Aging Parent
29. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Le-Chen Tsui Catholics vs. Theologians: Anger on the Dereliction of Duty
30. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Ho-Ling Hsu A Ph.D. Student’s Anxiety about his Qualitfication Exam for the Ph.D. Degree
31. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3
Max H. Sotak A Philosophical Mode of Life: Pierre Hadot’s What is Ancient Philosophy?
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This article presents Pierre Hadot’s treatment of a philosophical mode of life as it originated in ancient philosophy and fared down through the centuries. Hadot contends that philosophical discourse begins with a choice of life—an existential option from which philosophical discourse arises. The concept of philosophy as a purely theoretical attitude developed after the ancient period and reflects the domestication of philosophy within the context of the medieval and modern universities. The ancient schools of philosophy were concerned with a way of life that demanded the conversion of one’s being, a change of life­style, and a specific view of the world. Philosophical discourse, on this view, was designed to reveal, justify, and represent the existential option to the world.
32. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3
Elliot D. Cohen What Else Can You Do With Philosophy Besides Teach?
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This article traces the rise of philosophical counseling in the United States, from its roots in the applied philosophy movement to the establishment of the National Philosophical Counseling Association, including a code of ethical standards for practitioners and a program for certification of philosophical counselors. The article demonstrates, through a brief discussion of the philosophical counseling modality of Logic-Based Therapy (LBT), how individuals who have Masters or Ph.D.’s in philosophy can become certified members of this burgeoning new profession.
33. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3
James D. Patteson Rational Buddhism: Antidotes to the Eleven Cardinal Fallacies Presented in Elliot D. Cohen’s The New Rational Therapy from Buddha and Some of His Greatest Disciples
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This article shows how Buddhist philosophies are consistent with the rational counseling approach of Logic-Based Therapy (LBT), as presented in Elliot D. Cohen’s book, The New Rational Therapy: Thinking Your Way To Serenity, Success, and Profound Happiness. It presents many Buddhist insights as pathways to the “transcendent” or guiding virtues of LBT, and, accordingly, as philosophical antidotes to its eleven “cardinal fallacies.” It therefore helpfully adds to the repertoire of philosophies that can be used by LBT counselors in helping counselees address their problems of living.
34. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3
Martha Lang Philosophical Antidotes for Annie’s Anger
35. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3
Dusan Galic A Counselee’s Vicious Cycle of Discontent Over Life Pursuits
36. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3
Stefania Andretta Nadia’s Anxiety About Choosing a Dissertation Topic
37. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3
Mia Massaro Using LBT to Balance a Counselee’s Grief About An Adult Son Who Rejects Her
38. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3
Danny Nichols Molly and the Three Cardinal Fallacies: A Successful Case in Logic-Based Therapy
39. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 4
Ho-Ling Hsu Interpretation of the Movie “Peaceful Warrior”: From the Views of Ch’an Philosophy and Logic-Based Therapy (LBT)
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
The American movie, “Peaceful Warrior” (2006), starring Scott Mechlowicz and Nick Nolte, is a story about an outstanding athlete’s perplexities and anxieties. The main character in the movie, Dan Millman, aggressively pushes his performance in order to become a top athlete. As a result, he develops feelings of perplexity and anxiety, and suffers daily from these problems, leading to insomnia. The other character in the movie, Socrates, who works at a gas station, is like a philosopher. Socrates not only helps others to feel better, he can also help himself; in other words, he provides philosophical counseling services. In this paper, I utilize a combination of Buddhist philosophy and Logic-based Therapy (LBT) to interpret and analyze scenarios from this Movie, hoping to provide materials for philosophical counseling. The Buddhist philosophy I use includes the Ch’an philosophies of attachment, contemplation, greed, animosity, ignorance, non-duality, and meditation. The Five Steps of Logic-Based Therapy I incorporate include: (1) identifying the counsel­ee’s emotional reasoning; (2) identifying any irrational premises; (3) refuting any irrational premises; (4) finding antidotes to the refuted premises; and (5) exercising willpower in overcoming cognitive dissonance. There are six aspects that I address in this paper. The first is the anxieties of the Movie’s main character, Dan. The second is the philosophical counseling approach attained by combining Ch’an philosophy and Logic-based Therapy. The third is “knowing the dissatisfactions,” i.e. the process of finding one’s emotional reasoning/irrational premises. The fourth is “terminating the causes (of the dissatisfactions),” i.e. refuting the irrational premises. The fifth is “cultivating the path,” i.e. finding an antidote to the refuted premises. And the sixth aspect is “realizing the cessation (awakening),” i.e., exercising willpower in overcoming cognitive dissonance.
40. International Journal of Philosophical Practice: Volume > 3 > Issue: 4
Andrew Caputo Analyzing the Fallacy of Demanding Perfection
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Applying basic concepts of Logic-Based Therapy (LBT), this paper addresses the author’s own struggle with demanding perfection, and seeks to provide a model for others to emulate.