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21. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 5 > Issue: 12
Jerome McGann The Crisis in the Humanities
22. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 5 > Issue: 12
Arun Kumar Pokhrel Ethnicity, Race and Question of Englishness
23. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 13
Henry Weinfield “Is There A Measure On Earth?”: Hölderlin’s Poem “In lovely Blueness” In Light Of Heidegger’s Essay “. . . Poetically Man Dwells. . . .”
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This essay turns from a discussion of measure as it pertains to poetry to a discussion of Hölderlin’s poem “In Lovely Blueness” in the context of Heidegger’s essay on that poem, “Poetically Man Dwells.” For Hölderlin, paradoxically, although man measures himself against the godhead, there is a sense in which, for man, there is no measure on earth. I argue that Heidegger’s attempt to bridge the gap between absence and presence has the effect of “retheologizing” the poem and distorting its meaning. The argument proceeds partly by measuring several English translation of the poem against one another.
24. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 13
Contributors
25. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 13
Dr. Robert Brown Prosaic Desires
26. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 13
Sara Crangle Desires Dissolvent: How Mina Loy Exceeds George Bataille
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For Mina Loy, human appetites are often comical, even uproarious. This essay considers Loy’s use of risibility–the desire to laugh–as it accompanies and extends her examinations of longings such as sexuality and hunger. Modernist philosophers like Nietzsche, Bergson, and Freud were preoccupied with laughter; Loy responds to their approaches in her writing, as do many of her contemporaries, particularly Wyndham Lewis. Here it is argued that in her poetry and her thirties novel, Insel, Loy depicts a desiring body neither whole nor inviolate—a body determined by otherness and endlessness. Loy’s articulation of desire, in other words, is both in league with, and more extreme than that of French philosopher Georges Bataille, who was himself a product of a large-scale reconsiderationof human longing at the outset of the twentieth century.
27. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 13
Marjorie Perloff Conceptual Writing: A Modernist Issue
28. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 13
Dr. Satwik Dasgupta (Im)Probable Solutions? Space and Place in Thinking Territory: Some Reflections
29. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 13
Stephen Fredman Art as Experience: A Deweyan Background to Charles Olson’s Esthetics
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Charles Olson’s erudite poetry and prose have elicited discussions that emphasize sources he himself references or was known to consult. The present essay counters this trend by examining the importance of John Dewey’s concept of experience for understanding the largest stakes of Olson’s project. Although Olson is not known to have read Dewey or to have attended the lectures that became Art as Experience (1934), Dewey can be seen as the signal pragmatist precursor for Olson’s attempts to unite art and experience in a more holistic model of culture than the hierarchical and alienated one that prevailed after World War II. Like Dewey, Olson emphasizes the importance of direct experience over received knowledge, values the rough, unpolished quality of vernacular creation over the normative esthetics of cultural institutions, believes in the pedagogical effectiveness of both experience and art, and sees artistic form as arising out of fully engaged experience.
30. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 13
Peter Nicholls A Necessary Blindness: Ezra Pound and Rhythm
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Modernism is often characterised by its appeal to painting rather than to music as a model of literary form. This essay explores what is taken to be a continuing dependence on metre and rhythm as types of signification. From Swinburne and Mallarmé through to Pound and Eliot, it is argued, poets looked to “musical” effects of verse as rich sources of memory and association.