Narrow search


By category:

By publication type:

By language:

By journals:

By document type:


Displaying: 21-40 of 89 documents

0.102 sec

21. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 15
Perry Dane Flags in Context: A Discussion of Design, Genre, and Aesthetics
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
The Association’s 2006 publication of its flag-design manual Good Flag, Bad Flag inspired a lengthy analysis and critique of its meaning, importance, and limitations, arguing for a more expansive view of flag design. This paper received the Driver Award in 2007.
22. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 16
Anne M. Platoff Merged Federal Subjects
23. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 16
Anne M. Platoff Symbols
24. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 16
Anne M. Platoff Summary
25. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 16
Anne M. Platoff Design Basics
26. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 16
Anne M. Platoff Conclusion
27. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 16
Anne M. Platoff Federal Subjects
28. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 16
Anne M. Platoff Colors Used in the Flags
29. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 17
Scot Guenter Juxtaposing Symbols in Civil Religion: The Lady and the Flag
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In this paper the leading proponent of observing the flag as the centerpiece of the country’s civil religion explores how Sarah Palin, the 2008 vice-presidential candidate, embodied the archetypes of the female essence of America—Good Mother, the Woman Warrior, and the Sex Goddess—all juxtaposed with the American flag. The paper is extensively illustrated.
30. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 17
Anne M. Platoff Soviet Children’s Flags
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In the Soviet Union (1922-1991) small flags designed for and used by children were more than just toys. Deep scholarship and extensive illustrations of flags from the author’s collection show how such flags played a significant role in the socialization of Soviet children.
31. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 17
Peter Ansoff Flags of the State Navies in the Revolutionary War: A Critical Overview
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
During the Revolutinalry War, ten states created their own navies, separate and distinct from the Continental Navy organized by Congress, to fight the British. Categorized into “blue water,” “brown water,” and “minor” navies, they played an important role in the Revolutionary War and the development of the nation’s early flags.
32. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 17
Maikel Arista-Salado y Hernández The Presidential Flags of Cuba from 1909 to the Present
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
How could the flag of the chief of state of this Caribbean nation have been portrayed with the wrong color in otherwise-definitive flag books (such as Neubecker) for most of its history? The author shows how a misreading of the original description led to the use of a light blue field instead of the standard dark blue, and proposes an update to the design of the flag.
33. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 17
Dean Thomas Ensigns of New Zealand
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
While the roots of the country’s ensigns lie in those of the United Kingdom, those of New Zealand have often “broken the mold” with a potpourri of tradition and originality. The article describes over a dozen ensigns ranging from the national flag to the Ministry of Transport ensign.
34. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 19
Steven A. Knowlton Applying Sebeok’s Typology of Signs to the Study of Flags
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
Thomas A. Sebeok (1920-2001), a leading semiotician, developed a useful typology which the author uses to analyze national and subnational flags, exploring them as signals, icons, indexes, and symbols and using extensively illustrations.
35. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 19
Anne M. Platoff The “Forward Russia” Flag: Examining the Changing Use of the Bear as a Symbol of Russia
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
A newly-developed flag displayed by avid Russian sports fans in support of their national teams marks a change in the use of the bear symbol—first only used by outsiders to represent Russia but now claimed by Russians as their own.
36. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 19
John M. Hartvigsen Utah’s Mammoth Statehood Flag
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
As Utah prepared to celebrate its long-awaited entry into the Union in 1896, locals sewed and displayed from the ceiling of the Mormon Tabernacle the largest flag ever made, a record which stood for 27 years and continued a tradition of large flags in Utah. This paper won the Driver Award in 2010.
37. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 19
Scot M. Guenter The Cinco de Mayo Flag Flap: Rights, Power, and Identity
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
When five white high school students in Morgan Hill, California, flouted a school policy against wearing flag-themed clothing, which had been aimed at reducing tensions on the day celebrating Mexican pride, the media firestorm decrying their treatment roiled the political airwaves.
38. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 19
John M. Purcell Emotion and Flags: A Personal Perspective
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
This compelling essay describes the author’s own relationship with flags over a lifetime of engagement and study. This volume of the journal is dedicated to his memory.
39. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 2
Jiří Tenora The National Flag of Turkmenistan of 1992
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
In 1992 the former Soviet republic of Turkmenistan adopted a completely new flag, using as primary charges five “guls” or carpet medallions. The article explains the complex geometry and symbolism of the flag, including why the crescent points toward the hoist, unlike most other Islamic flags.
40. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 2
Peter Edwards The Flags of Recreational Boating: A Preliminary Survey
abstract | view |  rights & permissions
During the past 275 years the thousands of yacht clubs in the world have shared a common symbol—a burgee. Individuals, club officers, and events all used flags. This article provides an overview of the subject and suggests a classification system.