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21. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
Francis Etheredge The First Instant of Mary’s Ensoulment
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The Fathers of the Second Vatican Council recognized that the doctrine of the Incarnation is specifically concerned with the coming of Christ to free mankind from bondage to both original and personal sin. Original justice and original sin also can be examined through the dogma of the Immaculate Conception. By considering these concepts through the original moment of Mary’s conception, we gain a better understanding of the moment that each person is conceived. Thus a proper understanding of the Immaculate Conception will help us develop a better definition of human conception.
22. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
Kevin Wilger Embryo Models Derived from Stem Cells: A Response to Nicolas Rivron and Colleagues
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In their article “Debate Ethics of Embryo Models from Stem Cells,” Nicolas Rivron and colleagues call for a debate on stem cell–derived human embryo models. They first ask four questions regarding ethics and embryo models, and then give four recommendations to investigators and regulators. Understanding the nature of embryo models is crucial to determining their treatment. If they are human organisms, they should be protected by existing guidelines for ethical research. For instance, the good—which for humans includes organismal flourishing—precludes experimentation on embryonic humans. However, investigators do not know with certainty whether embryo models are equivalent to embryos. Therefore, investigators must halt experiments, evaluate data, and engage in debate before continuing with research.
23. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
Justo Aznar, MD Is There a Purpose in the Biological Evolution of Living Beings?
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An unquestionably important biological question is whether human beings are the product of chance or of purpose in the evolutionary process. Charles Darwin did not accept purpose in biological evolution, a view not shared by his colleague Alfred Russel Wallace. The controversy has remained ever since, and while many experts argue against purpose in biological evolution, many others defend it. This paper reflects on this biological and ethical problem, relating it to the possible existence of a plan that governs and shapes the evolution of living beings and that is ultimately responsible for the development of Homo sapiens.
24. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
Lisa Honkanen, MD Collaboration with Voluntary Stopping of Eating and Drinking
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Voluntary stopping of eating and drinking (VSED) is an increasingly popular method by which patients are choosing to hasten death when life feels unbearable. This formal act of suicide often leads to distressing symptoms, for which patients then seek palliation by medical professionals. The intentional act of hastening death is always an evil act. A Catholic physician must understand the moral implications of participating in any phase of the patient’s planning and execution of the VSED process, including cooperation in evil and scandal. The Catholic physician must strive to develop a well-formed conscience and then be prepared to exercise his or her right to conscientious objection while offering an example of true compassion for the sick, the suffering, and the dying.
25. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
Jeanatan Hall The Ethics of Human Tripronuclear Zygotes as Germline Editing Subjects
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Despite great interest in the field of gene editing, sparked by the advent of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated applications, the personhood of tripronuclear zygotes has not been addressed appropriately. 3PN zygotes are discarded as medical waste, and their use as models for human genome editing is becoming increasing common. 3PN zygotes possess an extra set of chromosomes, which often leads to severe genetic abnormalities; they are dismissed as “nonviable embryos” and treated as an ethically acceptable alternative to human embryonic research. However, given the development cycle of 3PN zygotes and the qualifications for human personhood assessed, there is compelling evidence that 3PN zygotes are indeed human persons. Although genetically disadvantaged, they deserve the same respect as do genetically normal human zygotes.
26. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
Pope Francis Address to the Vatican Diplomatic Corps: (January 8, 2018)
27. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Benedict Ashley, O.P., Albert Moraczewski, O.P. Cloning, Aquinas, and the Embryonic Person
28. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Renée Mirkes, O.S.F. NBAC and Embryo Ethics
29. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Edward J. Furton Notes on Bioethics
30. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Helen Watt A Brief Defense of Frozen Embryo Adoption
31. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
John Ahmann, O.P. Therapeutic Cloning and Stem Cell Therapy
32. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Norman Ford, S.D.B. The Human Embryo as Person in Catholic Teaching
33. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
JoAnn L. Davidson A Successful Embryo Adoption
34. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Daniel Avila The Present Standing of the Human Embryo in U.S. Law
35. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Richard Doerflinger The Policy and Politics of Embryonic Stem Cell Research
36. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 4
Edward J. Furton, Ph.D. Philosophy, Law, and Theology
37. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 4
Amalia M. Issa Clinical and Moral Challenges of Pharmacogenomics
38. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 4
Nicanor Austriaco Genetic Engineering, Post-Genomic Ethics, and the Catholic Tradition
39. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 4
Bro. Nicanor Austriaco, O.P., Ph.D. Science
40. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 1 > Issue: 4
David A. Prentice Brave New World of Genetic Engineering