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21. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Corey Miller Natural Law in Judaism
22. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Gregory J. Kerr Soldier Boy: The War between Michael and Lucifer
23. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Stewart Goetz The God of Consciousness: A Review Essay on Recent Work by J. P. Moreland
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In his two first-rate books, Consciousness and the Existence of God: A Theistic Argument and The Recalcitrant Imago Dei: Human Persons and the Failure of Naturalism, J. P. Moreland argues that our existence as conscious beings presents insurmountable problems for naturalism and evidence for theism. In this review, I summarize Moreland’s treatment of three issues in scientific theory acceptance, which he claims are relevant to determining which world­view, theism or naturalism, is better able to explain the existence of conscious mental entities. I then raise some questions about their supposed relevance and conclude with some thoughts about the simplicity and immateriality of the soul.
24. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Steve Schley Knowledge of God
25. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Tim Weldon The Vision of Gabriel Marcel: Epistemology, Human Person, the Transcendent
26. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Jeremy A. Evans Loving Wisdom: Christian Philosophy of Religion
27. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Adam Wood On Aquinas
28. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Michael W. Austin God and the Reach of Reason: C. S. Lewis, David Hume, and Bertrand Russell
29. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Gregory E. Ganssle Tactics: A Game Plan for Discussing Your Christian Convictions
30. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Michael S. Jones God’s Rivals: Why Has God Allowed Different Religions? Insights from the Bible and the Early Church
31. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
William Lane Craig Much Ado about Nothing: A Review Essay on The Grand Design
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While declaring philosophy to be dead, Hawking and Mlodinow are deeply engaged in philosophical speculation. Their treatment of the origin and fine-tuning of the universe, though unsympathetic to theism, turns out upon examination to be quite supportive of natural theology.
32. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Francis J. Beckwith Guidance for Doting and Peeping Thomists: A Review Essay of Aquinas: A Beginner’s Guide
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This essay is a review of Edward Feser’s Aquinas: A Beginner’s Guide. In the first part, the author summarizes the book’s five chapters, drawing attention to Feser’s application of Aquinas’s thought to contemporary philosophical problems. Part 2 is dedicated to Feser’s Thomistic analysis of Intelligent Design (ID). The author explains Feser’s case and why Aquinas’s “Fifth Way,” which is often labeled a “design argument,” depends on a philosophy of nature that ID’s methods implicitly reject.
33. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Kevin Corcoran A Critical Appraisal of Francis Beckwith’s Defending Life
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In his book Defending Life, Francis Beckwith claims that the question of personhood and human nature is the central question in the abortion debate. He further asserts that the unborn entity, from the moment of conception, is a full-fledged member of the human community. In this paper I try to show that the argument Beckwith offers for the moral wrongness of abortion in Defending Life is unpersuasive, his elucidation of key terms question-begging, and his claims concerning embryology and zygotic (and postzygotic) development highly controversial.
34. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Gary Hartenburg Rethinking Athens and Jerusalem: A Review Essay on When Athens Met Jerusalem
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In When Athens Met Jerusalem, John Mark Reynolds makes (1) a claim about Plato’s account of the relation between myth and argument, (2) a claim about Plato’s account of knowledge and science, and (3) a claim about the relation between faith and reason. I criticize each of these claims. Regarding the first claim, I show that Reynolds’s explanation of the role of a person’s experience of Platonic forms is unclear. Regarding the second, I indicate some tensions between the antirealist character of Platonic philosophy of science and Reynolds’s insistence that some claims about the empirical world are true. Lastly, I attempt to clarify Reynolds’s explanation of the relation between faith and reason by thinking of them as two parts of a single whole whose goal is to comprehend truths about God.
35. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
J. B. Stump The Evidence for God: Religious Knowledge Reexamined
36. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Patrick Arnold Morality without God?
37. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
W. David Beck The Cambridge Companion to Atheism
38. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Michael McFall Family Ethics: Practices for Christians
39. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Tawa J. Anderson God Is Great, God Is Good: Why Believing in God Is Reasonable and Responsible; Contending With Christianity’s Critics: Answering New Atheists & Other Objectors
40. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Paul Reasoner, Charles Taliaferro Revelation Today: A Review Essay on Divine Teaching and the Way of the World
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There is much to appreciate in Samuel Fleischacker’s Divine Teaching and the Way of the World: A Defense of Revealed Religion. In the tradition of Tolstoy, Fleischacker argues that secular philosophy does not have the resources to provide for a meaningful life; a life of meaning is to be found principally through revealed religion. In the end, however, his concept of revelation seems very thin, ruling out even the intelligibility of experiencing God. We critically assess his atrophied concept of revelation and his views on historical truth, science, and theism.