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Displaying: 201-220 of 270 documents

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201. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
Tim Hector Walter Rodney Was Most Rare
202. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
Paget Henry Tim Hector: An Introduction
203. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
Tim Hector Walter Rodney, the Dread Scene There and Here
204. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
Tim Hector The Crisis in Education
205. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
Tim Hector Hail Bwana! Farewell Papa!
206. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Adlai Murdoch Writing India in the West Indies: Indo-Caribbean Inscriptions in Trinidad and Guadeloupe
207. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Maarit Laitinen-Ford The Global Cosmology of a Local Religion: A Caribbean Twist in Discourses of Diaspora
208. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Ashmita Khasnabish Kincaid and Sri Aurobindo: Ego-transcendence in Indian and Afro-Caribbean Thought
209. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Grant Farred Living in Crowded Houses: The Dialogic of Alienation in the Fiction of C.L.R. James and V.S. Naipaul
210. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Patricia Mohammed Beyond the Colonized Boundaries of Ethnicity in Trinidad
211. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Matthew Quest C.L.R. James' Political Thought on India & Peoples of Indian Descent
212. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Ralph Premdas "Coolietization'' and "Niggerization": Commentary on V.S. Naipaul and Paget Henry
213. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Brinda Mehta Addressing Marginality Through the "Coolie/Dougla" Stereotype in CLR James's Minty Alley
214. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Paget Henry Between Naipaul and Aurobindo: Where is Indo-Caribbean Philosophy?
215. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Ricardo Sanín-Restrepo Creolization as a New Poetics of Power: On Jane Anna Gordon’s Creolizing Political Theory: Reading Rousseau through Fanon
216. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Drucilla Cornell No Revolutionary Decolonization without Creolization
217. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Michael J. Monahan Creolizing History and Identity: On the Subject of History in Jane Gordon’s Creolizing Political Theory
218. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Douglas Ficek Creolization and Philosophical Anthropology: The Humanism of Creolizing Political Theory
219. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Anjuli I. Gunaratne “Writing Traumatic Time”: The Tragic Art and Thought of Sylvia Wynter
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This essay reads Sylvia Wynter’s only novel The Hills of Hebron (1962) as a modern tragedy, one that both challenges and builds upon Raymond Williams’s concept of modern tragedy. The essay’s main argument is that tragedy, as a literary form, and the tragic, as a philosophical concept, are fundamental to Wynter’s project of creating forms of counterpoieses. Engaging Wynter’s interlocution with tragedy is crucial for comprehending how she is able to transform loss into a condition of possibility, primarily for the writing of what she calls “traumatic time.” Instead of only blocking mental representation, traumatic loss in Wynter becomes the first gesture of a philosophical activity that makes presentable that which has been lost or abandoned to a state of ruin, an argument that Walter Benjamin, another writer in dark times, had earlier made in The Origin of German Tragic Drama. Occupying the temporality of the tragic, Wynter has always made the re-assumption of the past—“slave, slave masters and all,” as she says—central to her project of critiquing and dismantling the “descriptive statement” of Man as the only permissible version of the Human. In my reading of The Hills of Hebron, I show how the novel utilizes the aesthetic, particularly the medium of theatricality, as the grounds for a theoretical framework that makes, in a manner redolent of Antigone, “the wretched of the earth” presentable not as “symbolic death” but rather as allegories of resistance.
220. The CLR James Journal: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1/2
Sylvia Wynter Beyond Liberal and Marxist Leninist Feminisms: Towards an Autonomous Frame of Reference
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This paper attempts to outline an autonomous feminism; a feminism with its own voice, and one that will transcend the binaries in which Marxism and liberalism are still caught. Its first step is to make clear the semio-linguistic foundations of all human social systems. These foundations consist of an open-ended set of social imaginary signifiers embedded in complex abduction or analogy-producing schemas, the creative conjugating of which makes possible the establishing of social orders such as families, monarchies or patriarchies. The second is to show that the semiotics of these orders require dominant or central signifiers, such as father or king, that must be supported by subordinate or peripheral ones. Third, the paper shows that women have consistently functioned as subordinate signifiers in these order-producing semio-linguistic codes. Fourth and finally, the paper details the semiotic difficulties of overthrowing this underlying governing code and thus breaking women out of their assigned subordinate positions.