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201. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Rev. Paschal M. Corby, OFM Conv. The Imperative of Conscientious Objection in Medical Practice
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In response to a growing movement opposed to conscientious objection in medicine, the medical profession should resist the privatization of conscience in general and accept the challenge, presented by conscientious objection, of rethinking its practices and being true to its calling. These claims are informed by the traditional understanding of conscience and the thought of Jürgen Habermas on the relevance of religious truths in public debate and the legitimacy of public dissent.
202. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Jillian J. Boerstler Repeat Valve Replacement in Substance-Addicted Patients
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An emerging ethical dilemma in light of the opioid crisis, repeat cardiac valve replacements for patients diagnosed with endocarditis from intravenous drug use presents specific challenges to Catholic health care organizations. While secular health care is tasked with the allocation of scarce resources, Catholic institutions must address additional considerations when balancing stewardship of scarce resources, human dignity, and patient accountability. A recent ethics consultation illustrates the issues involved in multiple valve replacements for substance-addicted patients from a Catholic ethical perspective. The discussion includes policy recommendations and ethical reflections.
203. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Angela Franks End-less and Self-Referential Desire: Toward an Understanding of Contemporary Sexuality
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Is postlapsarian sexual desire primarily altruistic or disordered? This paper utilizes the resources in the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas and in the contemporary magisterium to argue that recent phenomena such as the #MeToo movement underscore the inherently unstable and aggressive nature of sexual desire when it is uprooted from its natural end (i.e., is end-less). Aquinas highlights three aspects of desire that more sex-positive accounts of sexuality would do well to heed: its natural infinity, its self-referential nature (grounded in amor concupiscentiae), and its power of rationalization. By directing the motor of desire toward its natural ends, virtue—led by reason—can redirect desire away from self and toward the good.
204. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Rev. Nicanor Austriaco, OP, Janet E. Smith, Elliott Louis Bedford, Rev. Travis Stephens, Rev. C. Ryan McCarthy Initial Reactions to the Recent CDF Responsum on Hysterectomy
205. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Rev. D. Paul Sullins Is Sexual Abuse by Catholic Clergy Related to Homosexuality?
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Sexual abuse of minors by Catholic priests has been a persistent and widespread problem in the Church. Although more than 80 percent of victims have been boys, prior studies have rejected the idea that the abuse is related to homosexuality among priests. Available data show, however, that the proportion of homosexual men in the priesthood is correlated almost perfectly with the percentage of male victims and with the overall incidence of abuse. Data also show that while the incidence of abuse is lower today than it was three decades ago, it has not declined as much as is commonly believed, and has recently begun to rise amid signs of episcopal complacency about procedures for the protection of children.
206. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Stacy Trasancos Science
207. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith Response to a Question on the Liceity of Hysterectomy in Certain Cases: December 10, 2018
208. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith Responses to Questions Proposed concerning “Uterine Isolation” and Related Matters: July 31, 1993
209. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Jay Bringman, MD Medicine
210. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Christopher Kaczor Philosophy and Theology
211. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Daniel P. Maher Human Subjects Research Regulation: Perspectives on the Future
212. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Rev. Thomas Berg Knowing the Natural Law: From Precepts and Inclinations to Deriving Oughts
213. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Rev. Gerald D. Coleman, PSS On the Family
214. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Sara Coverstone, RN Medicine and Health Care in Early Christianity
215. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
James Beauregard Theological Neuroethics: Christian Ethics Meets the Science of the Human Brain
216. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Index to Volume 18
217. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Rev. Matt O’Reilly The Walls Are Talking: Former Abortion Clinic Workers Tell Their Stories
218. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Jay Bringman, MD Challenging Underlying Assumptions of Wrongful Birth: Parental Counseling and Self-Perceptions of People with Down Syndrome
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The concept of wrongful birth, which is based on the premise that a person would have been better off never having been born, is a serious mat­ter for Catholic obstetricians, especially in the context of prenatal screening. This principle, in conjuncture with the belief that individuals with disabilities have a decreased quality of life, has been used to promote a eugenic mentality. Consequently, prenatal screening tests often are used to identify fetuses with disabilities, who subsequently are aborted. Not only is this practice ethically reprehensible, but its presuppositions about quality of life find little support in the medical literature. In fact, in the case of Down syndrome, there is consider­able evidence to the contrary: individuals living with Down syndrome have a high quality of life and are accepted by their families. These data illuminate the discrepancy between how physicians portray Down syndrome to expect­ant parents and what the literature shows regarding this condition.
219. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Gwyneth A. Spaeder, MD In This Issue
220. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Jennifer E. Miller, Marie-Catherine Letendre Therapeutic Orphans: The Ethics of Including Children and Pregnant Women in Research
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Children and pregnant women are often excluded from clinical research. This has resulted in a paucity of evidence on how medicines work for fetuses, neonates, infants, and adolescents. It also raises bioethics, scientific, and public health concerns. For over half a century, doctors have prescribed medicines to children largely on the basis of how they work in adults, despite children’s varied physiologies and differences in how their bodies absorb and metabolize drugs. Regulations and legislation have led to an increase in the number of pediatric studies and to better drug labeling. However, children at all stages of their lives often remain “therapeutic orphans” owing to insufficient evidence about how medicines work for them.