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241. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Edward Andrew Education and the Funding of Research
242. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Darin Barney, Aaron Gordon Education and Citizenship in the Digital Age
243. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Langdon Winner Technological Euphoria and Contemporary Citizenship
244. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Ronald Beiner Our Relationship to Architecture as a Mode of Shared Citizenship: Some Arendtian Thoughts
245. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Edward Hamilton, Andrew Feenberg The Technical Codes of Online Education
246. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Graham Longford Pedagogies of Digital Citizenship and the Politics of Code
247. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Leah Bradshaw Technology and Political Education
248. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
David E. Tabachnick The Politics and Philosophy of Anti-Science
249. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Darin Barney The Morning After: Citizen Engagement in Technological Society
250. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Keith Culver Adoption and Governance of Biotechnology in Democracies
251. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
John Farnum Untangling Technology: A Summary of Andrew Feenberg’s Heidegger and Marcuse
252. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Daniel Dahlstrom Comments on Andrew Feenberg’s Heidegger and Marcuse
253. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Robert C. Scharff Feenberg on Marcuse: “Redeeming” Technological Culture
254. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
David Castle The Balance Between Expertise and Authority in Citizen Engagement About New Biotechnology
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Academic-researcher-led public engagement and consultation on new biotechnology provides information about new biotechnology to the public, and solicits their attitudes, beliefs and understanding about the technology. A burden associated with the democratic ideals of transparency and accountability encourages researchers to provide accurate information to the public. Less recognized is their role as actual, or perceived, authorities to provide new knowledge and to make policy or regulatory decisions. This paper focuses on the first of these two – the conflation between expertise on the subject of the engagement and the authority to represent that subject in an engagement process. While expertise, or at least accuracy in portraying expert knowledge, is consistent with transparency and accountability, it is argued here that authority in the representation of expert knowledge may be inconsistent with the intent of public engagement and consultation.
255. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Andrew Feenberg Reply to Dahlstrom and Scharff
256. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Marc Saner Citizenship Engagement, Biotechnology and ICTs: Are There Any Inherent Problems?
257. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Andrew Feenberg What I Said and What I Should Have Said: On Critical Theory of Technology
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In this reply I address problems identified by my critics in my concept of formal bias, my use of phenomenology, the relation between my work and McLuhan’s media theory, and the relation of science to technology.
258. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Joke Bauwens, Karl Verstrynge Digital Technology, Virtual Worlds, and Ethical Change
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This paper questions the shifting meaning of the ethical categories of proximity and alterity in the light of the technological and social changes that virtual social worlds went through. It takes Roger Silverstone’s key theme of “proper distance” as a point of departure, and discusses the significance of this concept by linking it up with the more media-theoretical approaches on virtual communication as developed in McLuhan’s and Baudrillard’s body of thought. It is argued that today’s virtual realities ask for both a philosophical and media-sociological reconsideration of the traditional ethical category of alterity. As such, it links up with Feenberg’s idea that “online groups are indeed a qualitatively new medium” (A. Feenberg and M. Bakardjieva, “Virtual Community: No ‘Killer Implication,’” New Media & Society 6(1) (2004): 37–43, 41), but at the same time challenges Feenberg’s reservations about a theory of media centrism.
259. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Roy Bendor The Role of Experience in the Critical Theory of Technology
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Andrew Feenberg’s critical theory of technology features a sophisticated analysis of the ways by which social forces influence processes of technological design, production and use. While Feenberg is foremostly read as a critical theorist, this essay argues that his call to democratize technology stands on distinct phenomenological grounds. This is based on the way he illustrates the role of experience in subtending potentials for the progressive transformation of the sociotechnical sphere. Against this background, this essay identifies an important shift in the way Feenberg articulates experience, from relating it to lifelong processes of learning and identity-construction (Bildung) to an emphasis on visceral immediacy (Erlebnis). This shift manifests a newfound focus on material, embodied meanings over-against linguistic ones, and results in a considerable tension between Feenberg’s appeal to experiential self-evidence and his critical position toward technology. The discussion of the two modes of experience exemplifies the current that underlies Feenberg’s work, namely the creation of traffic between ontological and ontic accounts of sociotechnical entities, practices and relations.
260. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 17 > Issue: 1
Gert Goeminne Science, Technology, and the Political: The (Im)possibility of Democratic Rationalization
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In this paper, I elaborate on the very political dimension of epistemology that is opened up by the radical change of focus initiated by constructivism: from science as knowledge to science as practice. In a first step, this brings me to claim that science is political in its own right, thereby drawing on Mouffe and Laclau’s framework of radical democracy and its central notion of antagonism to make explicit what is meant by ‘the political.’ Secondly, I begin to explore what this intrinsic political dimension of science might entail for democratic thought. I do so by connecting my preliminary explorations in the field of science with Andrew Feenberg’s elaborate frame of thought on the democratization of technology. Interestingly, Feenberg is one of the few thinkers who have connected questions of power and ideology, typically treated of within the field of political theory, with a constructivist approach to technological progress. In this sense, this paper can be seen as a first attempt to expand Feenberg’s framework of democratic rationalization from the world of technology to the world of science.