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41. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 34 > Issue: 4
Répertoire/Services administratifs—détails supplémentaires/Reproduction affranchie d’agrément préalable
42. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 34 > Issue: 4
Abonnements
43. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 34 > Issue: 4
Avis aux auteurs
44. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 4
Guy Lafrance Le Structuralisme et la Philosophie des Sciences Sociale
45. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Benoit Garceau Critical Notice of Richard Swinburne, The Coherence of Theism
46. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 41 > Issue: 4
Pierre-Yves Bonin Le retour de la méritocratie: la théorie de la justice sociale de David Miller
47. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 41 > Issue: 4
Stéphane Courtois Le patriotisme constitutionnel de J. Habermas face au nationalisme québécois: sa portée, ses limites
48. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 41 > Issue: 4
Richard Bodéüs Le commentaire entre tradition et innovation
49. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 41 > Issue: 4
Patricia Nourry Pascal. Qu’est-ce que la vérité?
50. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 41 > Issue: 4
Sébastien Charles Berkeley’s Principles and Dialogues. Background Source Materials
51. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 41 > Issue: 4
Jeffrey Reid Kant et la genèse de la subjectivité esthétique. Esthétique et philosophie avant la Critique de la faculté de juger
52. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Daniel Laurier La publicité et l’interdépendance du langage et de la pensée
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ABSTRACT: I clarify in what sense one might want to claim that thought or language are public. I distinguish among four forms that each of these claims might take, and two general ways of establishing them that might be contemplated. The first infers the public character of thought from the public character of language, and the second infers the latter from the former. I show that neither of these stategies seems to be able to dispense with the claim that thought and language are interdependent, and that the second strategy raises more difficulties than the first. I then examine the reasoning by which Davidson means to establish that thought depends on language. I claim that this reasoning is not conclusive, and that it can be adapted in such a way as to establish aversion of the thesis that thought is public which does not presuppose that language is public, and aversion of the thesis that language is public which does not imply that thought depends on language. I conclude with the suggestion that despite appearances to the contrary Davidson’s doctrine is defensible only if it implies at least the conceivability of intentional systems that would lack language altogether.
53. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Yvon LaFrance Platon: les formes intelligibles. Sur la forme intelligible et la participation dans les dialogues platoniciens
54. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Yvon Gauthier Entre science et réalité. La Construction sociale de quoi?
55. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Marco Bélanger La honte est-elle immorale?
56. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Claude Piché Fichte et la première philosophie de la nature de Schelling
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ABSTRACT: When we reconstruct Fichte’s philosophy of nature of the Jena period, we notice striking similarities between the conception of organism in the Doctrine of Science and Schelling’s corresponding developments in his early Naturphilosophie. Even though both thinkers agree to consider organic nature within the framework of transcendental idealism, it is nevertheless possible at this stage to discover slight differences in their interpretation which announce their future disagreement on the status of a philosophy of nature. If, for instance, organism for both Fichte and Schelling can be considered as an analogon of the absolute, much depends on whether they conceive this analogy from a practical or theoretical point of view.
57. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
Monique Lanoix Émotions et valeurs
58. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
David LeFrançois La Révolution technique. Essai sur le devoir d’humanité
59. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
Guillaume Rochefort-Maranda Probabilité et support inductif. Sur le thèoréme de Popper-Miller (1983)
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ABSTRACT: In 1983, in an open letter to the journal Nature, Karl Popper and David Miller set forth a particularly strong critical argument which sought to demonstrate the impossibility of inductive probability. Since its publication the argument has faced many criticisms and we argue in this article that they do not reach their objectives. We will first reconstruct the demonstration made by Popper and Miller in their initial article and then try to evaluate the main arguments against it. Although it is possible to conceptualize logically the idea of induction, it is shown that it is not possible on traditional Bayesian grounds.
60. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 43 > Issue: 4
Guillaume Fréchette La Logique de la philosophie et la doctrine des catégories. Étude sur la forme logique et sa souveraineté